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Deep Planting

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Brad starts with ...
perhaps some of you caught this clip on gardening australia about planting deeply - i.e. leaves into soil, not at pot height
http://www.abc.net.au/gardening/stories/s3019307.htm

I've a feeling I came across this a couple years back and even tried it with something, but I'd forgotten again. Heard many times the "don't plant it deeper than it was in the pot". Tomatoes are a known exception.

Anyone here able to share experiences for or against either approach? I suspect it works best for herbs, vines and some shrubs??? I suspect most trees won't like it.
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Brad2
Como, Perth
26th September 2010 11:44pm
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Jason says...
With anything that can grow from cuttings I figured you can plant them at any depth. Also anything that doesn't have many feeder roots along the surface. Today when I moved a Chery plum I planted it deep since it has neither much of a feeder root system and can grow from cuttings.

But I'd expect planting an Avocado or White sapote or something jungleish like those that feed almost 100% off rotten leaf matter, wood and dead insects/insect poo with extensive feeder roots would end very badly if you planted them deep. The only trick I know some people might not is to plant things facing the same way they were growing in the pot. Otherwise they spend ages bending back towards the sun and waste a lot of energy doing that, I think that's a major part of "transplant shock". Maybe in the tropics where the sun isn't low in the North for such a long time of the year that isn't an issue
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Jason10
Portland, Vic
27th September 2010 12:02am
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Original Post was last edited: 27th September 2010 12:07am
amanda says...
Funny you mention that Brad - I was just reading about the possibility of root strangulation of the trunk on fruit trees planted deeper (and thus they slowly starve to death)

Wouldn't know the answer - but I actually did plant my fruit trees deeper on th advice of the local tree supplier (all hers are fine with this method) and so far so good..(fingers crossed) I don't know if I would risk it again though, to be honest.
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amanda19
Geraldton Mid West WA
27th September 2010 2:11pm
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BJ says...
They had a segment on it a few months ago, but as part of a regen project. Supposed to get a much better success rate for bury and walk away type gardening.

Wouldn't work for grafted plants though would it?
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The poster formerly known as...
Brisbane
27th September 2010 7:37pm
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allybanana says...
I always go deep in a massive hole inriched with compost and plant the tree in a basin so it is easy to water and it gets its roots down. It has worked well for grapes, pears and appricots and pomergranates seam okay but early days. In veiw of the above maby thats one reason why the newly planted citrus is looking a bit crook but avacardo is happy, time will tell
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Eden S-East NSW
27th September 2010 7:56pm
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au0rey says...
Yeah I watched the programme too talking about deep stem planting...wow it is amazing and totally counter the usual planting instructions.

It obviously do work and I will try out when I have a tree to plant next round.
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27th September 2010 8:03pm
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Brad says...
Do the experts in this approach actually advise to bury grafts?
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Brad2
como, perth
27th September 2010 8:31pm
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John Mc says...
I read about an interesting method of deep planted propagation of Avacado's. They plant the grafted Avo tree well below the graft line and restrict the sap flow to just above the graft. This forces roots to sprout above the graft, from the cutting itself.
It's just a way to get the Avo cuttings to strike. It doesn't matter what rootstock you use, can be anything, it's only purpose is to keep the cutting viable untill it strikes it's own roots.
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JohnMc1
 
27th September 2010 8:38pm
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Brad says...
so much to experiment on... so little time and space
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Brad2
como, perth
27th September 2010 9:03pm
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amanda says...
Hmm - burying the graft sounds dodgy - that's how I lost my loquat (long story) many natives can be deep planted with great success. In dry areas it helps their survival to get the root ball down deep.
I plant most of my natives like this.

The trouble I am now having with the fruit trees is that the mulch getting closer to the graft over time....
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amanda19
Geraldton Mid West WA
28th September 2010 11:03am
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allybanana says...
That’s a great idea John mc for getting cuttings to strike that are difficult to strike, feed them from a deep root, you could likely strike a bigger cutting that way. I might try that for persimmons.

In other situations where you want to keep the rootstock, how likely is it that the graft will go bad if it is buried. in some cases you would get away with it wouldn’t you?
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Eden S-East NSW
28th September 2010 7:12pm
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Jeannie says...
I have just seen a segment on Gardening Australia about deep planting. Has anyone ever used this technique with whole geranium plants or cuttings? Or have any advice or comments? Thanks.
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Jeannie1
Perth
3rd August 2012 9:49am
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snottiegobble says...
Jeannie i have a feeling that any cutting that needs a day or so to dry out the base for normal propagation like a geranium would probably rot if deep planted & I think this would apply to other soft/ juicy stemmed plants such as succulents!
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snottiegobble
Bunbury/Busso
3rd August 2012 11:49pm
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