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Is ginger easy to grow?

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Has anyone ever tried growing ginger in a Perth type climate? Do I just get a bit of root from the green grocer and put it in the ground?
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Fremantle
3rd November 2010 11:10am
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Jim says...
Can't speak for normal ginger but Galangal which is from the ginger family grows well.
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Jim
Fremantle
3rd November 2010 1:53pm
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Julie says...
I think you need to protect it over winter - maybe a greenhouse or similiar.

I have read several times that ginger needs 9 months of warm weather to form good roots. We only really get 6 months in Perth.

But it's worth trying with one root in a pot - no big deal if it doesn't work.
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Juie 1
Roleystone WA
3rd November 2010 8:26pm
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jules says...
I grew some in the hills once. It grew until it was a foot high, then bandicoots took a dislike to it and kept pulling it out. Didn't eat it, just pulled it out and left it on the ground. Having a laugh at me probably!
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jules4
hills
10th April 2011 10:59am
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snottiegobble says...
This spring I bought ginger, galangal & turmuric rhizomes & planted them in pots with plenty of B&B,pelleted chook manure in the potting mix. they have remained in the shaded greenhouse.
The ginger did not sprout,the galangal has mediocre growth, but the turmeric is magnificent!
Someone on the forum once mentioned that commercial ginger is treated with a growth inhibitor & I now believe them so make sure you source yours from an organic supplier.
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snottiegobble
Bunbury/Busso ( smack in the middle)
10th April 2011 11:46am
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Nick says...
Thats not necessarily true snottiegobble, I bought a ginger rhizome from Coles (plump with some visible "eyes") and planted it in a pot of garden soil in my greenhouse. I watered it occasionally and eventually it sent up a shoot which is now about 1 and a half feet high! After one failed attempt, I found out that they need not too much water before rooting but more when it grows leaves. I saw some rhizomes which looked good for rooting not long ago, I you like I can root it for you.
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Nick T
Altona, VIC
10th April 2011 7:36pm
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au0rey says...
I managed to use broken pieces of ginger which I bought from market/supermarket and planted it in the ground a while back. Only one out of four produced a shoot and now two shoots. I have since protected the shoots with stakes surrounded with strong translucent plastic and lots of sugarcane mulch. I think with Melbourne's weather, it may not survive unless I have greenhouse. Anyhow I will know when winter ends.

I also bought a pot of galangal from Melbourne flower & garden show and just planted into ground. Same treatment with plastic and I think it will survive. Galangal seems hardier than the normal edible ginger.

I tend to agree with Nick that if we water too much before any sprouts, the roots may rot before sprouting.

Gingers are so expensive...today I bought a piece at $29 per kg! It's worth trying to grow some since they are perenial. :)
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au0rey
melbourne
10th April 2011 7:52pm
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au0rey says...
Here's the picture of the ginger shoot before I protect it with plastic.
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au0rey
melbourne
10th April 2011 7:53pm
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Nick says...
Heres some pics of my plant. As you can see a couple of the leaves have a bit of sunburn or something.
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Nick T
Altona, VIC
10th April 2011 8:28pm
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snottiegobble says...
Thanks folks! you may well be right about the watering before sprouting although the ginger rhyzomes were still solid when I threw them out. Maybe they were inports & not grown locally!
Thanks for your offer Nick, but WA quarantine is very strict on imports from Eastern states.
I will source some ginger locally & try again next spring.
I have heard that garlic from China wont sprout either!
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snottiegobble
Bunbury/Busso ( smack in the middle)
10th April 2011 8:40pm
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Brad says...
kalamunda markets has a stall flogging mainly ornamental but also edible ginger. I spoke to her the start of the month and she reckoned its easy both in ground and in pots. which surprised me
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Brad2
G Hill,Perth
11th April 2011 11:12am
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Peter says...
I tried supermarket ginger twice: Sprouted in ground, grew fine but died even already in autumn. Someone I know grows it in pots, seems to work fine, but I missed out to ask , if the pots are overwintering inside...
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Peter36
Perth
11th April 2011 2:24pm
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Diana says...
Hi Peter,

It's normal for ginger to die down in winter (when you can harvest it). It does that in Queensland too. Galangal does not die down in winter.
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Brisbane
12th April 2011 10:50am
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au0rey says...
My garlic bulbs from China (see the single bulb on the left of window sill) sprouted...many of them...and when i grew them they do grow fine.

The ones i bought from supermarket which are from Mexico?? if Iam not wrong also sprouted...and since they are the more expensive garlic ($16/kg), i decided to plant them and hope to harvest next season. :)
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au0rey
melbourne
12th April 2011 3:06pm
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Peter says...
Hi Diana,
what I meant was 'completly killed' - never saw it coming up with new shoots again!
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Peter36
Perth
12th April 2011 4:37pm
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KTV says...
How do you harvest ginger? Do I have to dig it all up or dig down and break a bit off?
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KTV
Mandurah, WA
14th April 2011 10:27pm
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Nick says...
You could either pull the plant up fully then plant it afresh or just brush back some soil and harvest as necessary.
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Nick T
Altona, VIC
14th April 2011 10:52pm
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Rakeesh says...
Could i please be told how to store ginger
After the harvest? I wish to dry and leave the skin on. Thankyou. Rakeesh
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21st April 2011 2:03pm
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Julie says...
Rakeesh, I don't know anything about drying ginger, as I like it fresh - completely different flavour. If you prefer it dried, maybe do a Google search for 'drying ginger'.

I peel mine and whiz it up in the food processor, then freeze in ice cube trays. One cube is usually perfect for a stir fry, and no need to fiddle with chopping at dinner time!

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Juie 1
Roleystone WA
21st April 2011 4:46pm
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au0rey says...
Rakeesh, you can store fresh ginger wrapped up with newspapar and place it in an unzipped ziglog bag in the vege compartment. Do not store it wrapped with in other sort of paper. Make sure you dry the ginger piece of excess moisture before storing or it will go mouldy and rot. I can store this way up to weeks...

Alternatively they can be frozen but once thawed, they are all soggy and soft which is not so nice to use.
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au0rey
melbourne
21st April 2011 7:20pm
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alinperth says...
Can anyone suggest where I can buy good quality ginger and galangal rhyzomes to plant out?
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alinperth
freo
3rd June 2011 4:47pm
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Charles cant spell says...
Now is not really the time as they are tropicals, I suggest you look in organic markets/stores, asian or really any small fruit n veg store. Perhaps wait until September then scout around for some fresh looking stuff, basically if is brown and dry it not as good, rhyzomes should be plump and shiny and colorful.
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Charlesstillcantspell1
Perth Innaloo
3rd June 2011 9:47pm
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radial says...
we bought china garlic planted left it in the ground for three years never touched it we now have so much all our fruit trees have at least six plants around each,and it is very very strong
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radial
GinGin West. Aust.
7th July 2012 5:07pm
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phlyn says...
I keep my ginger, with its skin on, in a jar of wine. Lasts for months. I leave the skin on when using it.
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phlyn
perth
1st November 2012 4:03pm
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MaryT says...
Ginger is quite delicious for stir fry when it's young––that is when it appears pink and the skin is thin and slips off easily. The older you keep it the stronger (hotter) it gets.
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MaryT
Sydney
1st November 2012 4:25pm
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Cerveza Chasa says...
I live in Perth and thought I'd give it a go. I can't quite rememeber when I planted my ginger (ginger root bought from a market), might have been start of last summer. The first lot died because I watered it too much. But this one survived. I only had it in a small pot to see if it would grow and I must say, I'm very pleased with the result. :) I'll definately be growing more. (picked today, 070713)
BTW, does anyone know where to get turmeric?
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Cerveza Chasa
Perth
7th July 2013 5:56pm
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Julie says...
Looks good Cerveza. What growing conditions did it get, eg shadehouse, sun, fertilisers etc? You obviously did the right things.
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Juie 1
Roleystone WA
7th July 2013 7:15pm
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Cerveza Chasa says...
Thanks Julie. I really didnt give it too much loving lol. I had it in the backyard and was only in the sun for half the day. Complete shade in scorching hot days throughout summer (that hot spell we had). I think I used blood n bone, compost and used seasol fortnightly.
:)
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Cerveza Chasa
 
7th July 2013 10:15pm
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Nick T says...
You can usually find turmeric in fruit and veg. shops. I can send you a piece if you want :)
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Nick T
Altona, VIC
7th July 2013 10:36pm
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juanita says...
I bought my ginger plant from bunnings on march this yr, it was thriving well in pot..@ the moment no sign of life, i hope it'll grow back when the weather warms up in oct
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juanita
melbourne
8th July 2013 2:05am
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MaryT says...
juanita they die back in winter; you can harvest the ginger once they've all browned off. Further watering would cause them to rot in the pot.
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MaryT
Sydney
8th July 2013 5:58am
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Brain says...
I second MaryT, once the leaves and stalk have browned off, you should be able to seperate the plant from the root (rhizome). That's probably when you know when they are 100% ready. I'd dig them up, cut off the roots and store in a airly place out of direct sunlight. Of course, go eat some but save a few decent sized pieces with the 'eye' for replanting comes next spring.

I too started off with a bunnings speciment some 3 years ago but have since supplemented growing ginger from the supermarket, simply because demand outstrip supply. I've had great success this year, with over 5 kg harvest from 4 large pots.

I think once you've tasted your own grown ginger and discover how easy it really is, there's no turning back. :)
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Brain
Brisbane
8th July 2013 9:37am
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MaryT says...
True, Brain. I gave a piece from my garden to my neighbour who sniffed it and pronounced it 'divine'. You won't get that reaction from supermarket ginger. :) I'm determined to grow more pots this spring.
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MaryT
Sydney
8th July 2013 10:16am
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BJ says...
I have to give it a good try this season. Birdwood, who usually supply Bunnings, grow theirs in 30cm pots so they can control the watering scedule and so its easily accessible for propagating. I have turneric, native ginger and galangal growing wild and need to get the ginger going to complete my dishes!

Anyone know how to use turneric? I'm swamped with it and need to learn how to use it properly.
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The poster formerly known as...
Brisbane
8th July 2013 11:41am
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Brain says...
I've found the 30 cm pots to be just adequate, but 40 cm pots seems to be just the right width and depth for ginger. I also use self watering types, and the ginger seems to like the access to water at the bottom of the pot.

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Brain
Brisbane
8th July 2013 1:14pm
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juanita says...
Tnx! for the helpful hints Mary T & Brain..I'll check my ginger 1st thing in the morning, i hope it's still alive coz i just gave some h2o few days ago
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juanita
melbourne
10th July 2013 1:48am
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Julie says...
I just came across this youtube video on growing ginger - in a cold climate. Some tips I hadn't heard of before.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DIDCGDPUlCY

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Juie 1
Roleystone WA
31st July 2013 8:38pm
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Nannyapples says...
You are right snottiegobble, Chinese garlic won't grow as they have to be sprayed when they arrive in Australiaand it kills them. ABC gardening show on Saturday morning said if you put a Chinese bulb and an Australian bulb in a glass of water, only the Australian one will shoot as the Chinese one is dead. More reasons to grow your own vegies.
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Nannyapples
Manjimup
29th August 2013 1:57pm
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Sarit says...
all sounds helpful now time to give it a go pitty its start of winter.
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Sarit
Hammond Park
16th May 2014 5:47pm
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Brain says...
Garlic - you can still grow, may be a bit late but can be done.

Ginger - wait till early spring. You harvest around early to mid winter. june to aug, so work about 9 months back. Ie plant in sep to nov. These dates works for me in bris. And i am on my 3rd season.

Lastly, keep an eye out for fresh harvested ginger at super/markets between now and spring for growing. I have a high request for my own grown ones and have to buy supermarket ones for growing next season. Look for young ones so you can store them until spring and free from mould. Have fun! It is very rewarding but takes a year of planning in advance.
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Brain
Brisbane
17th May 2014 8:11am
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Julie says...
Brain, if I bought ginger now, how best to store it till spring?
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Juie 1
Roleystone WA
17th May 2014 10:22am
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Brain says...
I have found moisture, humidity is your worst enemy. So not in plastic and any enclosed spaces. I even had some in an open container and it went mouldy.

Sunlight is both good and bad. In general, no direct sun but in a semi bright spot.

Air flow and dryness is key.

I would try to source gingers in late winter - that will save you the headache of storage for a few months. But sometimes you see something at a good price and just cant resist. I would buy a big long piece with good skin - looks like its been cured - but not wrinkly cured! avoid breaking it up and i normally just placed it on a table on top of some old newspaper.

also with supermarket gingers, they might have been treated, so maybe a quick wash and then dry skin throughly,

In about spring, as the temp warms up, you will see the nodes begin to swell and turn green, that is when i cut them in good size pieces, about 2 50 cents coin side by side as a minimum size. With Roughly 2 or 3 growing nodes. Not too small, otherwise they dry up. Then i would further rest it for 2 weeks for the wound to heal and sealed up. Then it is ready for planting in around mid spring.

I do take a bit of care to ensure any ginger collected from current season gets to a state of planting for next season. However, that is not to say that anyone cant simply buy some pieces and plant them straight and still get results, as it is fairly easy to grow. :)
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Brain
Brisbane
17th May 2014 1:23pm
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Brain says...
One of my pot of gingers. Prob 2 more months until brown off and ready for harvest. Its one of those half wine barrels type pot from bunnings and lined with builders plastic. I am hopeful of getting 2-3 kilo from it.

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Brain
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17th May 2014 1:35pm
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Julie says...
Brain, now would be the tricky time for ginger in WA, if it still has two months to go before harvest.

The nights are already pretty cool here, especially in the hills, so if I got ginger to that stage I'd have to move it into a greenhouse situation I'm sure.

I have a Hills hoist I have always planned to cover in plastic and turn into a greenhouse. The right sort of plastic is pretty pricey, but I'm going to investigate it.
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Juie 1
Roleystone WA
17th May 2014 8:05pm
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Brain says...
Julie, i have found that the most growth is in the late summer early autumn, when there is a bit of rain in brisbane. They love the rain. Except when nearer to harvest time, where you want the soil to be a bit dry, otherwise the rhizomes might rot.

They dont seem to mind the cold too much, in fact it triggers the dormant stage of the ginger and the green browns off and so you know it is ready to harvest. If it is quiet cold at your place, you can always harvest a bit early or plant the next batch early spring. So that they are nearer to harvest in early winter. This is my other pot, it was planted about 2 weeks earlier than the last picture and as you can see, there is a bit of browning already, suggesting some are ready. But given there is a bit of green as well, my guess for this lot is another month and i will harvest them. It is good to have a bit of stagger in harvest times for obvious reasons.

Btw, i planted mine in nov last year, as bris had a cold spring. I would say planting in sept and oct would be better, it really depends on how warm the temp is.
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Brain
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17th May 2014 8:29pm
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Original Post was last edited: 17th May 2014 8:26pm
Julie says...
Thanks Brain. Useful pic - good to know what it looks like at that stage.
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Juie 1
Roleystone WA
18th May 2014 1:23am
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Brain says...
Ginger update, the recent cold snap in the east coast 'told' my ginger to hurry up, and here are the results.

The browning of foliage indicating they are ready and the end result.

It is not as big as my previous years, so its a bit disappointing. I either grew too closely or didnt fertilise enough or didnt water enough. Of well, there is always next year.
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Brain
Brisbane
29th June 2014 11:24am
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MaryT1 says...
Looks good Brain but yes, I think you have too many plants in that pot.
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MaryT1
Sydney
29th June 2014 11:34am
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JohnMc1 says...
Nice one Brain. Mine is still growing full steam, in heated conditions of course. I think I put too many corms into one pot as well.
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JohnMc1
Warnervale NSW
29th June 2014 7:02pm
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VF says...
Nice haul from one pot. JohnMc, have you finished your polyhouse now?
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VF
Wongawallan
29th June 2014 8:18pm
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JohnMc1 says...
Not yet VF, it's been a while, things are getting overgrown, The project in town has taken much longer than expected. Can't wait to get back on the job and finish it.
I'm relying on a small heated polyhouse for out of season seed propagation and the like.
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JohnMc1
Warnervale NSW
29th June 2014 9:58pm
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Brain says...
i am envious. There was a story on Garden Aus and this Asian guy down in Vic had one built himself. He achieved like 50 deg C with just plastic sheets. I would love one just to keep the fruit flies away!
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Brain
Brisbane
29th June 2014 10:23pm
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VF says...
JohnMc, looks like a massive job but wow, when it's finished looks like you'll have plenty of room for all your tropicals!
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VF
Wongawallan
29th June 2014 10:27pm
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MaryT1 says...
Wow John Mc - sounds like a winter palace for your plants. It's bigger than my entire garden. Please invite me to the opening :)
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MaryT1
Sydney
30th June 2014 7:04am
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JohnMc1 says...
You will have vip status MaryT.
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JohnMc1
Warnervale NSW
30th June 2014 8:26am
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MaryT1 says...
Can't wait John Mc1; please hurry up and finish the thing or I might be too decrepit to come! How many years has it been? :)
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MaryT1
Sydney
30th June 2014 10:25am
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Julie says...

I'm so jealous!I don't have anything like that, just a little mini greenhouse with several shelves. I removed the shelves and have a large tomato plant which is doing well.

Today I picked a fully-ripe tomato on July 1st! I haven't measured the temp but it sure gets hot in there when the sun shines - it wilted badly one day in early winter.

Maybe I'll now get around to covering the old Hills hoist with plastic. I think you could fit a lot of plants in that space.

BTW John, will you cover it with shadecloth in summer?
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Juie 1
Roleystone WA
30th June 2014 7:32pm
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JohnMc1 says...
It's 6 metres by 12 metres by 3.5 metres high, with room to double it. That's and oldish pic, I have progressed with some bracing but still a little way off before the plastic covering goes on. I have been told it's best to install the plastic on a hot day so it stretches, so it might not go on till mid summer.
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JohnMc1
Warnervale NSW
30th June 2014 9:04pm
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Original Post was last edited: 30th June 2014 9:04pm
sternus1 says...
John how the hell did you bend those galvanized poles to make the archway? Looks great by the way, what will you grow over it?
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sternus1
Australia
1st July 2014 7:06am
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Brendan says...
Here's some pics of what we done. We drove in star pickets, then slipped poly pipe over them. Might be a bit easier then bending gal pipe :-)
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1

Picture: 2
 
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
1st July 2014 9:40am
#UserID: 1947
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sternus1 says...
I did the same thing with the poly pipe when I made my archway.

That looks awesome brendan, what was the total build cost?
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sternus1
Australia
1st July 2014 11:02am
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MaryT says...
Very pretty, Brendan - hope it's cow proof :)
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MaryT
Sydney
1st July 2014 1:19pm
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JohnMc1 says...
Nice job and completely finished. What size poly fitted neatly over the star posts?
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JohnMc1
Warnervale NSW
1st July 2014 8:14pm
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Brendan says...
Can't remember how much it cost, but wasn't too bad.
I 'think' it was 50mm (2") poly John Mc?
Note the garden beds are dead level :-)
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
3rd July 2014 8:12am
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JohnMc1 says...
That would make an excellent semi permanent structure with four posts in the ground, around the tree, and two arches crossed at 90 ° over each other to keep bird netting off the tree.. It would make it easy and neater. I just don't like the way bird netting is just strewn over the branches and tied up at the lower trunk. With your way, the netting is held away from the tree and you should have room to move in and around. Easy to install and easy to pull down. I have seen it done.
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JohnMc1
Warnervale NSW
3rd July 2014 9:10am
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sternus1 says...
John how the hell did you bend that galv. Pipe? Did it come that way?
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sternus1
Australia
3rd July 2014 9:31am
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JohnMc1 says...
The "whalebones" came from an old nursery - already made up. There's plenty of old polytunnels laying around idle. I lengthened the posts so I could get 3.5m in the middle,
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JohnMc1
Warnervale NSW
3rd July 2014 4:15pm
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Julie says...
JohnMc, I posted this in 2007!

Julie says...
Scott, your 'mossie net' will last longer if you erect a frame made of 2" black polypipe, so the branches don't snag. Just take the net down when you have finished picking, and it should last quite a while. Two lengths in a sort of cross shape at the top (may have to tie with wire)should do the trick. Sorry I can't do a drawing - hope this is clear.
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Juie 1
Roleystone WA
3rd July 2014 6:12pm
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