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Lots a lemons

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Kath starts with ...
Pot it up and remove all the fruit and flower, this will push it into a vegatative growth phase and get it growing nicely for you.
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Kath
Cawongla
13th December 2007 2:31pm
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Diann Brown says...
I gave my son a Lots of Lemons tree before winter, he lives down near Warwick, and the tree is looking decidedly sick. We think it may have got frosted, he has cut it back, but it just looks like sticks at the moment. Is there any hope for this tree?
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Diann Brown
Brisbane
7th October 2008 8:40pm
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Anonymous says...
Lots of lemons is just a cutting grown meyer lemon. (well marketed!!!!)If it is over watered or in a wet position, it will not cope. Frost shouldn't be a problem. Personally, i would rip it out and plant a grafted meyer lemon, it will do a lot better.
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Sydney
10th October 2008 8:01pm
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Alison says...
I bought a Lots a Lemons in Jan thinking I needed a mobile lemon tree. I've got it in a good big pot but after a few months the branches developed long thorns (1-2cm). Is this normal? There is only one branch that doesn't have them.
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Alison5
Perth
15th December 2008 7:07pm
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Wayne says...
Alison, I'm afraid to say that I think the branch without the thorns is probably the only "lots of lemons' you have, the rest have gone back to the stock root which is probably a bush lemon.
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Wayne1
Mackay
15th December 2008 7:23pm
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Alison says...
Thanks Wayne, I'll try cutting off all the prickly branches and see if there is anything left...
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Alison5
Perth
21st December 2008 11:18am
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Wayne says...
I hope I haven't deflated you Alison but if the plant is only a few months old and considering that we still have some growing time left before winter would you consider replacing it.
Plant the old one in the ground, if it grows it grows, if not you have lost just a few dollars
My Lots of Lemons is growing in the ground, the only downfall is that the fruit lays on the ground because there is so much of it. If ever I get another one I will get a couple of truck tyres and stack them on top of each other to let the fruit droop down
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Wayne1
Mackay
21st December 2008 6:15pm
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John says...
bunnings 23 bucks each, 33 at wandilla.
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John20
Perth
22nd December 2008 9:26am
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Andy says...
After reading Wayne's comments I thought I'd solved the problem of my under-performing Lots of Lemons. All branches have rather nasty thorns...so the conclusion: it's reverted back to its stock root. However, after going to Bunnings to replace it with a "real" Lots of Lemons, I found all of this variety there had thorns. Does this mean they all have reverted back to stock root. I'm confused.
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Andy
Mountain Creek
23rd December 2008 7:22pm
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Leona says...
They aren't grafted in the first place, rather, they are selected from choice cuttings of regular Meyer lemons.
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26th December 2008 7:32pm
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Stevo says...
Hi Guys. I have a "Lots a Lemons" planted in a 60 litre pot. I have had it for about one year. It has produced only 2 flushes of blooms in that time. The last lot of flowers produced about 10 or so little lemons. However, the fruits only lasted a week or so (approx a quarter of an inch before turning yellow and falling off or the bigger ones staying on until finally turning black It is in a well-drained pot with good quality potting mix and regularly watered. It also has slow release citrus fertilizer added.
Please help
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Stevo
Brisbane
17th January 2009 1:25pm
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Shannon says...
Ive had a lots of lemons tree in a pot (from Bunnings) on my terrace for about 6 months. It has flowered several times but never any fruit! It has thorns on the branches, is watered and fertilised regularly. Im at a loss. Any suggestions???
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Shannon3
Brisbane
27th April 2009 4:55pm
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Ann says...
Some trees take several years to reach maturity to start producing viable fruit. I have a lime that took 5 years, always flowered but would drop within a week, Now it's covered with limes non stop that I'm giving them away. The lemon I have is now fruiting after around 7 years of no fruit. It depends on the stock root as to how many years. I think some root stock now takes about 3 years. You might get the odd one or two fruits in the meantime but don't despair, so long as the tree is looking healthy it will be producing viable fruit eventually.
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27th April 2009 7:52pm
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Dekka says...
Hi Shannon, I have 'Lots of Lemons' too but the thorns on mine are barely noticeable. Are you sure you're not growing a root-stock? Stick a photo on if you can and we'll check it out.
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Dekka
Newcastle
3rd May 2009 9:05pm
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Wayne says...
This is what my "lots of lemons" looks like this morning, not a thorn in sight. It is definitely a grafted tree, which, by memory I got from Mitre10, because it sent up some "water shoots" with thorns from below the graph. Had I not trimmed them they may well have taken over.

At the moment it has a few large fruit left, some intermediate sizes and is starting to flower again.
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1

Picture: 2
 
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Wayne1
Mackay
4th May 2009 8:06am
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Wayne says...
"Leona says...
They aren't grafted in the first place, rather, they are selected from choice cuttings of regular Meyer lemons."
-----------

Leona, I think you are correct, I just went over to Bunnings and their trees definitely look like cuttings and they do have thorns and priced @ $31.95 each, They did also have a few on extended trunks for $130 each.

Alison, your tree may well be OK then and perhaps the tree I have was mislabeled. But I bought it as a "lots of lemons", it's a dwarf tree that gets covered in fruit. I'm sorry about that.
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Wayne1
Mackay
4th May 2009 9:50am
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Jimmy says...
My lotsa lemons is not that small, think me bin had by the promotors.
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4th May 2009 10:46am
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Wayne says...
Jimmy, I think "lots of lemons" were promoted to grow in pots but I stuck mine in the ground.

Question - Thinking that "lots of lemons" are cuttings from a Meyer lemon how come they have thorns, I didn't think these lemons did, or am I wrong.- thanks
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Wayne1
Mackay
4th May 2009 3:35pm
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Jantina says...
Just to confuse the issue even more, my "lots of lemons" ,in a pot 3 years has stayed small (about 50cm) gives good crops (at the moment 10 large and about 15 small) and has no thorns. Sounds like there has been some label swapping going on.
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Jantina
Mt. Gambier S.A.
4th May 2009 6:07pm
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Brendan says...
You're right Wayne, my grafted Meyer lemon tree, ~ 30 years old, has no thorns. I've been told they're a cross between a orange and lemon, but my info is it was named after Mr F N Meyer, who brought it back from China to California a long long time ago? Give me a 'bush lemon' any day, imho, they are the best. Also, I do think the 'lots-a-lemons' are only supposed to be grown in pots.? Btw, my 30 year old Meyer is only ~ 2.5m high x ~ 4m wide. At the moment, it's got ~ 150 lemons on, and there's ~ 100 on the ground, it just bears too many.
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Brendan
Mackay, Q.
5th May 2009 7:52am
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Andy says...
Is there anyone out there who can finally offer a definitive answer...do "Lots of Lemons" carry thorns or not (i.e. can you safely identify a real "Lots of Lemons" by its lack of thorns.
cheers
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Andy
Sunshine Coast
5th May 2009 9:40pm
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Brendan says...
Hello Andy, I was at bunnings yesterday, and saw two dwaft 'lots a lemons' in pots, and they both had small thorns. They also had two more 'lots a lemons', in pots also, these were ~ 1.5 metres high, and these had no thorns? (The tall ones were $129 each!) I know that doesn't answer your query, maybe someone else knows?
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Brendan
Mackay, Q.
6th May 2009 9:04am
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Dekka says...
Here's a pic of my very neglected 'Lotsa Lemons'. I'm amazed it produced three fruit given it's such a runt.
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1
  
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Dekka
Newcastle
7th May 2009 7:35pm
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jenny says...
I was given a Lots of Lemon tree ($120.00) for my birthday a week ago,a couple of days later I noticed that it had little black things on the back of a few leaves so pulled them off. What is the best thing to spray the tree with.
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jenny7
Brisbane
18th May 2009 9:47am
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John I. says...
Hi Jenny,
Can you be a bit more specific? What do the black things look like? If it's scale then try a white oil spray, otherwise if there army that many then just remove them by hand.
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JohnI
Melton
18th May 2009 10:29pm
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liz says...
my lotsa-lemon is flourishing well, lots of beautiful leaves and thorns too. got it from bunnings 6 months ago, along with a sublime lime tree. but there are no sign of flowers, let alone fruits. both trees are fed regularly. on the contrary, a recently purchased kafir lime is already bearing fruits. how soon are they supposed to bear fruits? the ones in bunnings are already bearing flowers at this time of the year. i feel cheated whenever i see my lemon tree.
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Liz7
brisbane
27th May 2009 12:26pm
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amanda says...
Hi liz - it is possible that your plant has produced alot of water shoots (these are not from beneath the graft)- are you able to post a photo?

Water shoots tend to grow straight up, are very thorny, vigorous and can be unproductive - they should be removed so they don't take over the framework of your plant.
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amanda19
geraldton. WA
28th May 2009 4:17pm
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Speedy says...
Or they (watershoots) can be used to restructure the shape of the tree.
Genetically they are the same.
that's most likely how the nursery people grew the 'Lots a Lemons' standards (ball on a stick) as mentioned earlier.
To do this you'd put the tree out of production for a year or so.
-Cut off all but the watershoot to be used as trunk.
any of the prunings can be used as cuttings to grow lots of 'Lotsa Lemons'.
Remove thorns from watershoots if safety is an issue.
cut top out of watershoot where you want it to start branching.
remove tips from resultant shoots,and keep tipping it out regularly until desired shape
is attained and top growth has changed to flowering/fruiting type growth.

you may need to stake/splint the trunk for a year or so till the wood on the trunk hardens up enough to support a crop.

That'll be the difference between your $30 plant and a $120 plant.

I dont have a 'Lots a Lemons'
but I do have cutting grown 'Eureka' and 'Lisbon' Lemons- only young ones but growing as well as the grafted ones.
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Speedy
Swan Hill, Vic
29th May 2009 9:00am
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Wayne says...
Interesting post Speedy, the water shoots on mine came up through the centre, got to about 5ft tall and full of thorns before I cut them back to the trunk. The rest of the tree doesn't have thorns.

So I guess some do and some don't have thorns, makes little difference as long as they are producing fruit.

Today it's full of bloom and small fruit
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1

Picture: 2
 
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Wayne1
Mackay QLD
29th May 2009 11:47am
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Speedy says...
I think the watershoot thing is partly a survival response left over from wild ancestors of modern citrus.
If you think of a Citrus tree in the wild as an understorey or forest edge plant there would always be the risk of it being overgrown by another plant.
Vigorous watershoots would enable the tree to get out of this situation.
The watershoot, with thorns to assist with it's support on other vegetation,
would grow through to where light conditions are better.
It would then revert to a reproductive type of growth. ie Flowers and fruit.

The fruitful vegetation has no real need for thorns so are
markedly reduced or absent on such growth.

Wayne in the case of your trees keeping the watershoots would be of no benefit
as the tree would eventually produce a lot of fruit out of reach if allowed to grow.
small is good if you have to pick fruit.
As a result of pruning out watershoots, your tree is kept at a nice managable size, as shown in photo.
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Speedy
Swan Hill, Vic
29th May 2009 12:53pm
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amanda says...
Roses produce water shoots too I think..(and thorns!!) Thats' helpful info speedy - I selected a good water shoot to become a new leader on one of my trees last month - as the tree was growing all wrong...now I know what to do with it!
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amanda19
geraldton.WA
29th May 2009 5:27pm
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hermit says...
are any of you people out there aware that the actual variety you are talking about is CPN1 .There is no variety called Lots A Lemons
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hermit
tuerong
18th June 2009 2:34pm
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James says...
I have a lemon tree that came with the house. When we moved in there were no leaves at all. Cut it right back and fed it some citrus fertiliser and then it started to grow. Now big and bushy with heaps of leaves and thorns all over. The problem is that only one branch is growing any lemons at all (about 20 on just the one branch) and the rest of the tree is just leaf. Why isn't any fruit growing on the other branches

Thanks

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James10
Nabiac
25th August 2009 1:27pm
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Jimmy says...
Are you sure its a lotsa lemons they are grown from cutting thus all branches are the same. A grafted tree may have sprouted from uder the graft but it would be a staight meyer.
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Jimmy
 
25th August 2009 2:21pm
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James says...
Hi Jimmy

Thanks for the reply

Not really sure what it is

It seems to take a really long time for the lemons to yellow (not sure if that helps first time I have owned a fruit tree)
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James10
Nabiac
26th August 2009 1:25pm
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Liz says...
Here are the photos of my lime and lemon tree. Neither one of them are blossoming yet, compared to my newly bought kafir and lemon trees. I have read somewhere that the root may have taken over the graft, and in this case, I may need to trim it off.

However, I can't tell which one is the root and which one is the graft. Can you help me by identifying which one I should cut off? I have labelled each main branches. Picture 1 is the lemon tree, and Picture 2 is the lime tree.

Thanks all!
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1

Picture: 2
 
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Liz7
Brisbane, QLD
13th September 2009 1:48pm
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Wayne says...
Both look fine to me Liz, be it a coincidence that they have both forked just above the graft. Those two small shoots at ground level on the right in pic 2 need to come off.
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Wayne1
Mackay QLD
14th September 2009 4:17am
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rick says...
meyer lemons are not lemons at all.they are a cross
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fraser coast
29th October 2009 9:03pm
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Elf says...
I have a lots-a-lemons I got from Big W and it has small thorns. I found out after I stabbed myself. They are about, 1/2 cm long.

Question though, I've had it for nearly 3 months and it hasn't grown at all - is it the wrong season for that or do I need to feed it something specific?

Cheers, Elf :)
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Elf
Albury
1st November 2009 4:13pm
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Drongo says...
I have a lots a lemons bought from a nursery and I have had it around two years but there hasn't been any decent fruit on it yet. The fruit I've got is around 3 or 4 millimetres long and not looking too healthy. Is it possible to over water, as I usually water around twice a week. It is sitting beside a tahitian lime and this tree is covered in fruit, both in pots and both watered at same time, both fertilized with the same stuff. Leaves look OK. Thanks for your time.
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Drongo
Gold Coast
2nd November 2009 1:11pm
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Itdepends says...
Watering twice a week in a pot wouldn't be enough IMO (daily to twice daily required in summer). What are you fertilizing with?- plants in pots are better off with slow release fertilizer and liquid feeds. (Liquid feed every couple of weeks in spring and autumn)

Elf- citrus grow in spurts- and can take a while to settle in- see comments above RE watering and fertilizing.
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2nd November 2009 3:30pm
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Drongo says...
I am fertilizing with a liquid fertilizer called Flourish which is high in nitrogen and I also have a slow release one from a company called BRunnings citrus food and I throw a bit of dynamic lifter on when I think of it. I also wee on them a few times a week. Maybe too much stuff??
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Drongo
Gold Coast
2nd November 2009 5:07pm
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Julie says...
Well, too much nitrogen I would say. Not sure about lemons, but other citrus can develop a thick skin if you have too much nitrogen.

I would stick to the application rates written on the packet from just one of the fertilisers and see what happens. You may have thrown the nutrients out of balance.
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Roleystone WA
2nd November 2009 7:56pm
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Itdepends says...
I'd stop using the citrus fertilizer- too strong for plants in pots.

Make sure you keep it moist- you should be seeing growth flushes around now- try watering once a day and see how you go.
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3rd November 2009 3:04pm
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kaya says...
I was given a Lots A lemon tree for a gift in October. it had a few flowers on it when i got it.
I then replanted it into my raised garden bed.
the flowers fell off and i now have a beautiful bushy green tree with no flowers at all. I have had a few leaves turn yellow but that's it, i don't even think there has been now growth.

How do i get it to fruit?
How often and how much water do they need?

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kaya
Brisbane
7th November 2009 1:37pm
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Lyn says...
My Lots A Lemons is 2 years old in 30cms pot. Leaves healthy dark green and tiny flowers appearing.

My question is "why are the leaves all curling up?" We've had alot of rain; do you think it might be poor drainage as the pot is not in a saucer?

I do spray it occasionally with pest oil. thank you!
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Lyn10
Highett Vic
11th September 2010 10:39pm
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M Nash says...
Most likely Leaf miner Lyn, Not the worst thing but unsightly all the same.
Ive been battling the buggers for years.
My own findings are that they are next to impossible to get rid of once they are there. My best attack is to spray from early spring and try to prevent them from infesting new growth in the first place.
I add a little permethrin to the oil spray as the oil has let me down alone.
Do this eight times over the warm months taking into account rainy days washing it away etc.
Fertilise well in late winter in time for new spring growth, Then is a matter of keeping an eye on all the new leaves.
Also spraying under the leaves will get results. Sounds like you need to get jiggy with a spray bottle
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MNash1
Terranora Northern NSW
11th September 2010 11:01pm
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Brendan says...
Here's some citrus tree tips by the guru up here.(it's a video).
He mentions how to get rid of leaf miner, and how to correct yellow leaves that have green viens.

http://www.abc.net.au/local/videos/2010/07/07/2946799.htm
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
12th September 2010 7:44am
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Ed says...
I purchased a small Clyde Plant Nursery Lots A' Lemons last year and we harvested 2 lemons from it. This year it started budding but then lost ALL its leaves.

Any suggestions to save this plant would be welcome.

Thanks
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Ed4
Canberra
3rd November 2010 6:20am
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Jimmy says...
Mine dpes that every year, next it will flower, set a heap of fruit and re-foliate.

Treat it nice, liddle bit of water and slow release fertiliser and all will be well.
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Jimmy
Perth
3rd November 2010 1:57pm
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Andrew says...
Hi,
I am considering planting a lotsa lemons in the ground.
The garden bed is on top of a block retaining wall and has a concrete path around it.
The trunk will be around 600mm from anything solid - are the roots of concern - will they affect the path or retaining wall? The ground is well drained.
My mother in law had a full sized Meyer Lemon and the roots seemed very large with plenty on the surface which looked as though they could do some damage.
Any advice will be appreciated.
Also, do grafts on flying dragon root stock develop thorns?
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Andrew15
Brisbane
6th January 2011 10:12am
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Viv says...
Hi my Lots of Lemons is dropping its leaves after they turn yellow. Lots of small fruit, but same thing happened last year and they all fell off apart from a lonely one which hasn't developed any further. Plenty of ants also. Repotted from original tub into 40cm one last year and fertilised with Organic Link. Obviously lacking something but I don't know what!!!
Should I fertilize again? Can you help?
Thanks.
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Viv
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15th January 2011 1:52pm
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Wayne says...
I would suggest a quality citrus tree fertiliser Viv, the tree looks hungry. Get rid of the ants with some ant dust and spread a little compost around
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Wayne1
Mackay QLD
15th January 2011 2:59pm
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Viv says...
Thanks Wayne, will give that a try. Do you recommend any particular fertilizer?
I do have some compost around the base but maybe not enough.
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Viv
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15th January 2011 3:30pm
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chris says...
Andrew, I wouldn't worry about the roots of lemon or any other citrus for that matter. They ain't going to be lifting pavers. Yes, they are shallow surfaced, but they are not invasive.
The Flying dragon rootstock shouldn't influence whether the grafted tree produces thorns or not. eg. a Lisbon lemon is always thorny, regardless of rootstock.
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Chris
sydney
15th January 2011 3:46pm
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Wayne says...
Not really Viv, just one off the shelf for citrus
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Wayne1
Mackay QLD
15th January 2011 4:41pm
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Peter says...
Hello Stevo,
I have the same problem with my potted Lots of Lemons. The tree seems very green and healthy. What, did you do?
Peter
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Peter35
Beaumaris
7th February 2011 6:44pm
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Viv says...
Fertilised my "lot of lemon" last weekend as advised and disaster. All the leaves are shrivilling up and dropping off. Quite a lot of flowers/fruit still on. Did I put too much fertiliser on and will I lose the tree?
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Viv
Brisbane
17th February 2011 1:40pm
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au0rey says...
Viv, your lemon tree could be over-fertilised or the fertiliser is burning the roots, not sure how you applied it but seems like the tree is reacting to it quite badly if their leaves are shrivelling and dropping.

Citrus are very fussy. From the pictures, it seems like yours are suffering from some deficiency. Their leaves always show very well. And do they get enough sun on your patio?

Perhaps re-potting the tree in a good new premium potting mix will save it cos you cannot leave the tree with the existing mix. And give it Seasol seaweed solution.
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au0rey
melbourne
17th February 2011 9:56pm
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Jacques says...
After reading Wayne's advice, I went outside to check my "Lots A Lemons" tree that I just bought at Bunnings last week; I was so relieved to notice that there were no thorns at all.
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Jacques
 
5th February 2012 2:23am
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Original Post was last edited: 5th February 2012 6:44pm
pleasant grove blessed says...
Thanks for all the interesting posts it inspired me to contribute.I bought a lots of lemons from Bunnings .At first I noticed it wasnt doing particularly well so after some investigation read some advice given by expert and treated with seasol followed by specfc citrus feriliser and it took oFF.Seasol apparently stimulates root growth and the fertiliser gave the nutrients For It to flourish.Along the way i notice leaves a bit yellowish so again research indicate a dose of chelated iron ,which is readily available at most Nursryes ,it was brilliant.So now my lots of lemons began to flourish. Ahh The scent of the blossoms .Then the bugs became the next issue.Yes the dreaded leafminer.This time the clarity of what i was dealing with and the solution came from an apple app.If you have an iphone or ipad Put Yates into search and there it is free an indispensable garden tool . The Yates app lead me to the knowledge i needed to deal with the leafminer that was attacking the new growth on my plant .Evidence of the problem are silvery trails and curling of the new growth leaves(Curling of older leaves is all together a different problem).The solution was white oil although i am not convinced. It certainly helps but during the summer months it has to be done regularly.So the journey has produced heaps of delicious fruit ,a wonderful flowerering scent and doubt and anquish along the the way but i am proud in the knowledge that i gave it my best shot and feel i succeeded
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pleasant grove blessed
mandurah west aust
8th February 2012 10:31pm
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Jacques says...
Thanks for the interesting info, can't wait to see some flowers popping out, I have used Seasol on mine too and the leaves are quite green up to now. Regarding the white oil you are talking about, will that not burn the leaves if sprayed in that hot summer we are having now?
Thanks

PS: Just installed the YATES app on my iPhone, it is awesome.
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Jacques
Perth
9th February 2012 1:02pm
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Original Post was last edited: 9th February 2012 1:10pm
Angela says...
So now my lots of lemons began to flourish. Ahh The scent of the blossoms .Then the bugs became the next issue.Yes the dreaded leafminer.This time the clarity of what i was dealing with and the solution came from an apple app.If you have an iphone or ipad Put Yates into search and there it is free an indispensable garden tool
http://lemonjuicefor.blogspot.com/
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Angela3
United States
9th February 2012 11:04pm
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Original Post was last edited: 9th February 2012 11:05pm
Mike says...
Lemons and oranges are not popular in their ancestral home in SE Asia with limes and mandarins genuine species and ruling the roost.Lemons throw more to the citron part of their parentage and oranges more to their mandarin parentage.It is perhaps a bit artificial to say what is and isn't a lemon considering they are of a pretty mixed up lineage.
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Cairns
7th March 2012 8:10pm
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jakfruit etiquette says...
When the alchemists gave up trying to turn lead into gold, they got legit jobs as taxomimists, turning Citrus into species..
Mah Hah Hah Hah
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10th March 2012 2:25pm
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JOEKOEL says...
WAHT IS THE ACTUAL NAME OF THE LEMON
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16th March 2012 2:03pm
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Eureka says...
Never buy citrus taken from cuttings. Root stock are used for a reason.
It will save you LOTS-A-GRIEF.
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16th March 2012 3:51pm
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Rowan says...
Citrus grown from cuttings are perfectly ok (Like most fruit trees), all mine are. I have two types of lemon, limes, oranges and cumquat all from cuttings and they fruit well and are strong.

The only reason for using citrus rootstock is if your soil is not suitable for the type of citrus you are wanting to grow. In my opinion if your soil is not good for them you should grow something more suitable to your site instead.
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Rowan
Casterton, Vic
17th March 2012 5:55am
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Eureka says...
One can play Russian roulette for a while, then reality bites.
For starters, phytophthora is everywhere and your cuttings have little resistance to it. Ditto nematodes.
Lower resistance to diseases and major citrus viruses. Variable fruit quality, little cold tolerance, drought tolerance, etc, etc.
A lot of the problematic symptoms will show up looking like a nutritional problems, but the cause is elsewhere.
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Riverina
17th March 2012 7:12am
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jakfruit etiquette says...
Cuttings are ok, as you say. Other reasons for using Citrus rootstocks are that budding needs less propagation material than cuttings( a cutting prob has 5 or 10 buds that could make plants)
Rootstocks offer resistance to rootrot/soil diseases, and can increase overall tree vigour.Some like Trifoliata can increase cold resistance in the fruiting variety, useful in colder areas.
Rootstocks can also cause problems when they sucker, or when planted in the wrong soil type for their liking.
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17th March 2012 7:22am
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Mike says...
Cuttings and marcots are as good as grafted trees in some species like guavas and lychees but this is not so for many species.Besides the potential problems that jakruit and Eureka point out, tree stability and shape can be poorer with cutting grown trees.They can topple over more easily in strong wind and more often are not erect with branches and folige touching the ground.Grafted citrus often shows 'elephant foot' incompatability near the upper thermal limits of the scion due to excessive rootstock vigour.
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Cairns
17th March 2012 7:56am
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jakfruit etiquette says...
When I saw pics on this forum of Citrus"elephant foot" in Cairns, using Trifoliata rootstock, I thought it looked like the scion was growing much bigger than the thinner stock underneath?? The rootstock is not keeping up with the scion? Any clarification??
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17th March 2012 12:27pm
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Mike says...
Jakfruit, it usually happens the other way with citrus and especially where the scion is out of it's comfort zone.In my yard rough lemon,citrange and troyer rootstocks got massive and fluted (elephant footed) with comparative broomstick navel,minneola and imperial scions on top.I have also seen it in valencia on trifoliata and everything on flying dragon.Excess scion vigour is less common and extreme partly because nutrient and water flow is controlled by the rootstock but it can happen.It looks like an elephants foot and can snap off easily being top heavy.
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Cairns
17th March 2012 1:03pm
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MaryT says...
Mike I thought that the 'elephant foot' of a rootstock is a sign of poor nutrition?
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MaryT
Sydney
18th March 2012 8:34am
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Mike says...
Mary, I have heard that it can happen due to poor nutrition.In the north it seems mostly due to growing cool climate citrus like minneola,imperial or navels.They show no signs of nutrient deficiency and still produce lots of fruit.They volunteered their spots to a ross sapote,canistel and abiu in the last year.
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Cairns
18th March 2012 10:11am
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MaryT says...
Sounds like you're not like your southern cousins who try so hard to grow tropical fruit trees, Mike. :)
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MaryT
Sydney
18th March 2012 10:52am
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Mike says...
Inside I scurry again with the next deluge.Mary, I've tried to grow brown turkeys,florda prince,yellow jaboticaba and in fact many temperate species without success.I also ditched shahtoot and dwarf mulberries after some early fruitfulness and just need to turn up my nose at most of bunnies and bigw's selection.
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Cairns
18th March 2012 11:00am
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MaryT says...
Yes, Mike, it's criminal of bunnies and others to sell stuff that they must know won't do well in the area; however, we know lots of people who DO want to grow stuff that are not perfectly suited for their area, don't we? Ah - the mind can never overrule the heart. LOL
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MaryT
Sydney
18th March 2012 11:04am
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Mike says...
I am at fault for buying them.People from the frost prone towns that get below zero like Herberton,Ravenshoe,Millaa Millaa and even Atherton would certainly buy their trees there when they are shopping in the city.That is probably why there is such a big supply of temperate species.
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Cairns
18th March 2012 11:20am
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David says...
Called into Bunnies at Smithfield Cairns back in july last year and found out this to be true wrong stuff for the wrong area, why cant they get it right , same here lilacs that should be grown in Victoria, also some stone fruit, crazy.
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David
Brisbane
18th March 2012 11:23am
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Mike says...
David,the big bunnies in town is even more that way but sometimes they get tropical fruit trees by accident.
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Cairns
18th March 2012 1:45pm
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David says...
good heavens, noooo kiding.
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David
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18th March 2012 3:50pm
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Devi says...
I bought a dwarf Tahitian Lime from the markets last week and a Lots-A-Lemons from Bunnings yesterday and now after reading these comments, I really wish I hadn't. Seems I may be out of my league with these dwarf varieties. I only wanted limes and lemons that can be mobile with our lifestyle rather than having to be left behind...
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Devi
Ipswich
8th October 2012 10:32am
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