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Mango tree not fruiting

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Bern Johnson starts with ...
Hi, thanks to Daley's Fruit Tree Nursery for setting up this forum. This is just what I need.

I live in Caloundra and have a huge mango tree at the back of my house. When hubby and I moved here, we were told to get the tree pruned, as this had not been done for a few years and this would encourage fruiting. We were also told that the first year after the big prune, that we should not expect any fruit from the tree. Well, two years on, the tree is still not fruiting.

Can anyone give me some help as to how to get our tree to fruit please?

With thanks
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Bern Johnson
Caloundra
21st June 2007 3:49pm
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Correy says...
Are you getting any flowers?
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Correy
Woolloongabba
22nd June 2007 7:50pm
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Claire says...
Hi there, we also have a mango tree in the garden that has apparantly not fruited for a couple of years it has a few flowers on it now but the neighbour says these usually fall off before having a chance to fruit. It is very large, do you think i have to prune it back to let the sun get through? Hoping someone can help!
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Manly West
1st August 2007 4:34pm
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Greg says...
Mango fruit set depends on several facters. Temperatures below 10 deg when flowering in the spring will reduce fruit set. Also wet weather during flowering can result in anthracnose infection which will cause fruit not to set. To get around low temperatures in Spring during flowering, one can remove the first flower set and this will result in a 2nd flowering a month later when temperatures are higher. Hope this makes sense Claire.
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Greg
Kyogle
1st August 2007 8:41pm
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latfi says...
Hi, to force the plant to bear fruits, apply potassium nitrate. (10 gram / litre of water) spray on the leave
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malaysia
5th September 2007 3:13pm
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Jo says...
My one Mango tree was here when I bought the house in 2001 and in early 2002 we had over 200 mango's-juicy and beautiful.
In 2003 I was lucky to find 20 on the tree. Since then I have had none.
Now there are a lot of tiny green ones.
How do we look after them??
What can we spray on the tree?

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Jo3
campbelltown, NSW
4th November 2007 10:49am
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Correy says...
It would be interesting to see a picture Jo. One at a distance and also up close of the newly forming mango's. It is easy to upload to these pictures to this forum.

Depending on the size of your tree you could give it a bi-weekly spray of copper oxychloride this time of year this stops powdery mildew and anthracnose from hindering fruit set.

Perhaps have a look at your mango tree and see if there are any signs of leaf deformation or the mango's having black spots that shrivel up and die.

My biggest problems are possums eating the mango flowers and the newly forming green mangoes.

Another thing about some mango's is that some seasons they will fruit much better then others. We have a huge "string" mango tree next to us. And every couple of years they will get a bumper crop that fills up a wheelie bin each week then other years barely at all.

Also if you are going to water your mango it is best to do so early morning or during the day rather then late afternoon. Otherwise the water sitting on the leaves overnight is a perfect breeding environment for fungus.
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Correy
Woolloongabba, QLD
5th November 2007 10:11am
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Jo says...
Here's some pictures of my mango tree. A lot of the flowers have turned black and only some little green mangoes can be seen. We have just had a week of heavy rain. Today is the first sunny day in ages. Would this be bad for the fruit??
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Campbelltown
11th November 2007 2:57pm
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Jo says...
Took a picture from the other side of the tree.
Thought I'd mention that my nearest neighbour has a lot of fruit trees and his peach tree is heavily infected with fruit fly and he's not doing anything about it.
Is it true that a string of garlic would help the fruit fly stay away??
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C'town
11th November 2007 3:02pm
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Greg says...
Not all flowers turn into fruit, so it is quiet normal for a lot of the flowers to abort. The fruit that has set should be sprayed with a copper fungicide to protect them from Anthracnose. With regards to Fruit Fly, you could use Naturalure to control fruit fly. Its an organic control but does need to be applied weekly through the fruit fly season. Ideally it would be good for your neighbour to use it too.
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Greg
Kyogle
11th November 2007 3:28pm
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Pete says...
I have a mango tree in my yard about 12 years old. It flowers at least nine months of the year (even in winter) It has flowered every year in the past five to six years but no fruits.

Last two years it set some fruits but as they got larger they split and got spoilt. so In March this year I gave it the chop (almost) and removed most of the branches. It has some leaves now. Well if I don't get any fruits next year it is a goner!

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Castle Hill
22nd November 2007 8:18am
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Ronnie says...
Howdy all

I have a mango tree I inherited from the property purchase this year. It is my first year so I got some tips from the previous owners.

1) Use a product called blood and bone (it's actually a soil mix of some sort). You can use this for all citrus fruit bearing plants as well.

2) Don't fret about the fruit that do grow and fall as there is only a 50% success rate of fruits reaching maturity.

3) Finally in the off season ie after this summer (use the supermarket as indicator of mango availability as it is seasonal) give it a good trim and strategically trim it so it grow good new branches that will later be used as stepping branches.

The neighbours actually mentioned that the previous owners trimming made the tree look quite bold to the extent that she was using a chainsaw.

Hope these helps and good luck. I'm lucky enough that I have 20 or so fruits but surely the drought up here is not helping.
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Ronnie1
Brisbane
28th November 2007 5:16pm
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Correy says...
Peter, are you from Castle Hill QLD?

I am in exactly the same position as you with a bowen mango tree. I have the following suspicions why it flowers but I don't get fruit.

1. Black Spot - Once the mango's start forming the black spot does as well and effects perhaps 40% of the fruit and this causes the fruit to abort. This is a very old variety of Bowen the newer varities such as the Dwarf Irwin Mango Tree are far superior. I have one in the pot and not one mango had any sign of black spot even though they are within 20m of each other.

2. Possums - Without doubt in the night lots of possums take to the tree and eat the flowers and young forming fruit. The mango tree is about 2.5 meters and unless you deter them from visiting the mango tree on a nightly basis there is no hope.

3. Early Flowering - In Brisbane sometimes it heats up for a few days just before spring which causes the mango to break out into flower. However then it cools down and this colder weather causes the mango to abort the flowers and drop the fruit. We knew about it this year so we pruned it heavily after the first flower and we got new flowers which stayed on much better then the year before.

Ronnie, I like the tip about the chainsaw. What variety do you have and do you have a picture for us? Also what did you mean by stepping branches.

What is your address in-case I am hungry and in the neighborhood one night ...... jokes:)
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Correy
Woolloongabba, QLD
28th November 2007 10:03pm
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Ronnie says...
Hey Correy... not quite sure what type of mango tree it is but certainly it's not the long type of mango fruits that it is bearing. It's starting to take form of those that you find in the supermarkets. I'll find out though

I'll send you some pics tomorrow.. bit difficult to do at night.

Stepping branches.. well the previous owners pruned it so well that the branches that was once there and then pruned is now an easy footing for climbing the tree and picking the fruits. Will take some pics of these too.

Cheers...
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Ronnie1
Brisbane
28th November 2007 10:37pm
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Kat says...
I actually started surfing the net to try and get to the bottom of my non fruiting mango tree. It's a bowen and 4 years ago when we first moved in we got a lot of fruit then the next year not as many then none at all for 2 years now. I absolutely love mangoes so i just have to find out why I'm not getting any anymore.
I've been pruning the tree after Christmas every year to keep it small. There's no sign of fungas etc. any suggestions??
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Rockhampton
21st December 2007 10:26pm
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Jo says...
Hi again. Had a good look at my tree today and managed to find 1 (ONE) good sized mango and thats it! (about 9cm round so far)
We sprayed the tree with copper spray in November and it seems to have worked for this one lonely mango.
Fingers crossed.
All the other little green mangos either fell off or shrivelled up and died.
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Jo3
NSW
7th January 2008 6:52pm
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Dianna says...
Hi Jo and everyone else, The pictures of Jo's mango flowers show typical anthracnose disease (I'll bet there were black leaves too) Anthracnose is a fungal infection, you have to spray regularly, not just once, from flowering right through to picking, usually Mankozeb, a copper spray or Fruit Care for us organic people.

If a fruit tree won't flower, fertilise with superphosphate.

Potash is for general good health, as it improves the quality of flowers and fruit; and strengthens the plant, increasing resistance to diseases etc.

Happy gardening, Dianna.
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Dianna
Greenbank Qld
8th January 2008 12:15pm
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Vishal says...
Hi, I am from India and I have 2 mango trees in my backyard. They have not borne any fruit this year and they are looking unhealthy(both of them). The new leafs are very small and are crumbled. Any idea whats wrong with them? and what could I do to save them?
Thanks
-Vishal
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Vishal
India
21st March 2008 8:16pm
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R Lenhart says...
I now have several Mangoes in my garden, I live on the SE coast nsw gets cold but this year had fantastic success, feed potasium nitrate a couple of months before xmas when the flowers come out dont make the same mistake as me, found it covered in flies ( not bees) sprayed them to find out flies propogate Mangoes thus my good crop this year, aparently the flowers smell quite off and flies are attracted, DONT KILL THEM they are the polinators, tree must have full sun and they say to each bunch of flowers you usually only get one fruit, I had 2 & 3 on the same bunch of flowers good luck regards rolf.
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rolf
Wollongong
22nd April 2008 8:03am
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BOB says...
MANGO GIVE YOU SPOTS DONT EAT THEM
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BOB4
USA
22nd April 2008 9:12pm
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BOB says...
Joke!
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BOB4
USA
22nd April 2008 9:14pm
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Dianna says...
Hello Vishal, Your mango tree sounds like it's got anthracnose, it's got black bits on the distorted leaves and the flowers go black? This is a fungal disease, the spraying routine has been discussed here already. You need to fertilise your trees with a complete fertiliser suitable for fruit trees (nitrogen, phosphate and potassium) in June and August. In Queensland, we fertilise mango trees in December and February, so that's early summer and late summer. Good Luck with your mangoes.
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Dianna
Greenbank Queensland
6th May 2008 8:23am
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Anonymous says...
i have some large and small mangoes on my three trees. I want to know if I can pick the large ones before they fall and ripen themin the kitchen. also I want to know how to take the seeds and cultivate them to grow more trees. cna anyone give me a dummies book on magoe ripening inside before the bugs and animals get them and how to cultivate the seeds no matter what size the magoes are. Thanks
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39
florida
14th May 2008 6:10pm
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Dianna says...
Hi Anonymous in Florida, you can pick the mangoes when they've 'coloured up', then they should ripen in the kitchen, just put them in the fruitbowl on the table. You could also leave them on the tree and cover them up with a cloth bag, that works for me, it keeps the insects, flying foxes (fruit bats) and the possums away. To grow from seeds - plant the seeds in a pot, water it, and it should grow. You might find that from one seed, you get two trees so you'll have to pick the best looking one. They will then take many years to fruit, it would be quicker to buy a grafted tree and then you would get fruit in a year or two. Happy Mangoes.
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Dianna
Greenbank
23rd May 2008 10:03am
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peter Muilenburg says...
We have a supposedly Thai variety of mango. Bought it small ( grafted) about four to five years ago and this year inApril it flowered in about ten clumps. Many of the flowers felll off in brisk winds and those that were left turned into tiny little mangoes, almost al;l of which have disappeared.
Do the trees have any norm for how long they take to first bear fruit? Is it possible to get a "lemon". . . ie one that doesn't bear ever?
Peter
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peter Muilenburg
St John, US Virgin Islands
2nd June 2008 5:02am
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Dianna says...
Hello Peter in St John. I suppose it is possible to get a dud mango tree. Make sure you fertilised the tree properly, give it potash for strong growth and good health. Look for the anthracnose, blackened distorted leaves and flowers, you have to spray every fortnight to overcome that. Why do we always get windy weather just in time to blow the flowers or fruit off? If the tree is in good health (remember the potash), the fruit/flowers should generally stay on the tree. Cheers, Dianna.
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Dianna
Greenbank Queensland
14th June 2008 8:30am
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Janelle says...
We moved to our house 2 years ago and the first year got about 10 huge and absolutely divine mangoes from our very large tree. Last season the tree was covered in flowers and through the fruit started to form they all dropped after we had a shower of rain and we didn't get a single mango. The tree is just starting to bud again now. Should I spray with Copper spray and if so when? Also is it too early in the season for the tree to be getting flowers.
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Janelle1
Maryborough, Queensland
25th June 2008 9:29pm
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Andrei says...
Mat, i don't think that's a mango mate - bark is too pink.

Worth saving this mango??
Dropped all it's leaves year ago.
Now monthly Fertilised with seaweed.
Possums continuously eating new shoots.
Tried regular bitter sprays.
Contemplating pruning right back
and Putting bird net over it.
Any other suggestions?
(how radical to prune, in stages?)

thanks, Andrei
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Andrei
Sunny Brisbane
10th July 2008 12:05pm
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Kathie Skrobiak says...
What does "coloring up" mean? My mangoes are getting red on the top and staying green on the bottom. Is that what you mean? They are still very hard.
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Kathie Skrobiak
Central Florida
3rd August 2008 11:57am
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Jonathan says...

Hello,

I had three lovely Mango trees in my garden and unfortunately one of the trees died and had to be pulled down. Now the second and third trees are showing the same problems (see photos). The second tree in particular has discoloured leaves and dead branches. I do not fertilize the trees. The picture of the leaves shows a leaf from the second tree (discoloured) and a leaf from the thrid tree (green).

Hope someone can help before I lose all three.

Tks

Jonathan
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Jonathan
Sydney
1st September 2008 10:16pm
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Kathy says...
I have the exact same problem. We have just planted them on this farm property to see if they will grow, now this problem just when they were soing so well. We are south east of Esperance. WA
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Sth Western Aust
10th September 2008 9:53pm
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Anonymous says...
antracnose, spray with mancozeb thats dithane to youse cockies down the bay of isles
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11th September 2008 9:24am
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Ellen says...
Kathy

you need to water your mango fruit tree more often, the tree is feeding on it leaves. Give it also slow fertilizer for fruit trees, especially now is starting the growing season for flowering to fruitings, give it plenty of water daily. If you're watering it heavily then every 2 -3 days, but especially coming into the hot summer season, daily is best for it.

Cheers.
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Ellen
smithfield
11th September 2008 9:31am
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Wayne says...
{Kathie Skrobiak says...
What does "coloring up" mean? My mangoes are getting red on the top and staying green on the bottom. Is that what you mean? They are still very hard.}

That's about it Kathie, they should also be nice and plump around the point at the bottom of the fruit. Don't worry about them being hard.
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Wayne1
 
11th September 2008 5:00pm
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Kathy says...
Thankyou u both I will try both and see what happens.
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WA
12th September 2008 11:32pm
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Bobby says...
I have had good luck with Miricle grow every two week - 3-5 teaspoons a gallon to trees in distress instead of regular granular fertilizer( don't do both too close together). I have had a tree that received too much water because it was right next to a septic system tank - and it had leaf and brach die-back. I stopped watering that particular tree and used the miricle grow and it is fine. I had lost a previous tree with the same problems in that same hole before we discovered where the spetic tank was located.
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BobbyB
Miami, Fl.
29th September 2008 1:09am
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Olga says...
I 'he got a y.o. KP mango and possums eat all new shoots.
Should I use blood&bone fertilizer to repel possums?
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Olga3
Brisbane
10th November 2008 3:07pm
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Autumn says...
Hi! I have a mango tree in my backyard and am not sure what type of mango it is. The fruit is long, green and sort of s-shaped. The fruit is getting a tiny bit of red on the top. Should i pick them now? Is there a good website to see pictures of the different varieties of mangos? I have found several websites but they usually show the more round fruit. My computer is not working correctly so I am unable to attach a picture of the tree with the fruit on it...sorry. Any help would be appreciated! Thanks!
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Autumn
San Diego, CA
23rd November 2008 6:24am
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paul says...
my mango tree is about 8 yrs a few years ago it started to fruit 1st season we had 4 or 5 fruit the next year had a few more the last couple of years the tree was chock a block with flowers now all the flowers are gone and no fruit the stems where the flowers were have turned black and died can you tell me how to fix the problem as we like our mangoes any advice will be very much apprecited thank you paul
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paul15
noosa heads
27th November 2008 3:36pm
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Jonathan says...
Thanks to anonymous my mango tree has recovered. Sprayed with Mancozeb. Kathy you must try it...works really well...Jonathan
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Jonathan
Sydney
4th December 2008 9:10pm
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Michael says...
Hi Autumn,
Please use the link below to check out different types of mangoes.Go back to their home page and you can search for almost any type of fruits or plants

http://www.toptropicals.com/html/toptropicals/articles/fruit/varieties_mango.htm
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Cabramatta
4th December 2008 9:38pm
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Anonymous says...
OLGA, Blood and Bone does repel possums, spray it on the leaves, I think you can buy liquid blood and bone. Also spraying with molasses in water can repel possums, maybe one cup molasses in a bucket of water. PAUL, your tree has got anthracnose, spray with Mancozeb or one of the copper-based products. You must spray every two weeks from the first sign of flowers all the way through, and remember the with-holding period (do not eat the fruit within x days of spraying). Good luck. Regards, Dianna.
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5th December 2008 8:29am
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Mitch says...
My mango tree is two years young. I just noticed the leaves on the tree are turning black. Is this a fungus and how do I cure the problem ? Thank You.
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Mitch1
Miami, Florida
26th December 2008 10:23am
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Robyn says...
I have 15 mature mango trees,one huge one about 30'tall,very green and full of leaves, but all 15 trees are planted in different areas of my property, all haven't fruited for over 5 years. Some look great, some don't. The locals tell me that when we get our seasonal heavy rain and wind around Oct/Nov, this ruins the flowers, hence no fruit. I cant believe this can be the reason for all 15 trees not fruiting. Maybe I will get out the chain saw! I have sprayed, cut them back over the years, but still no fruit. Living in a sub-tropical area, I would have thought they would produce at least one mango. What would my problem be??
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Robyn4
BYRON BAY
9th January 2009 10:46pm
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Wayne says...
To Mitch
I'm surprised you haven't had a reply earlier. Yes that sure looks like a fungus, so a copper based spray such as mancozeb or coperoxichloride should do the trick
-----------------
Hey Robyn, if you get heavy rain and wind when the flowers are trying to set it sure can be a problem, however, it seems unusual that you are not getting any fruit at all. So perhaps a good prune and fertilizer is in order.
I've just given our tree a moderate prune
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Wayne1
Mackay
10th January 2009 5:12pm
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Wayne says...
I think this photo is a better one
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Wayne1
Mackay
10th January 2009 5:22pm
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SlickMick says...
For anyone interested in pruning their mangoes this article should be of interest.
http://www.nt.gov.au/d/Primary_Industry/Content/File/horticulture/598.pdf
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SlickMick
 
11th January 2009 11:34am
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Craig says...
Robyn I also have 15 mango trees. They are about 11 years old. All trees appear healthy. About 5-6 years ago we had hundreds of mangoes, not one since then. I have experimented with pruning, fertilizing and irrigation on various trees still no luck. Because the trees are fairly large I have never sprayed them so maybe this would help.(Although you have said you've already done this)
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Craig5
Caboolture
18th January 2009 6:11pm
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SlickMick says...
Wayne, that's what my mango tree looks like now. Might be worth while to paint the saw cuts with a diluted white water based paint to prevent fungal attack.
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SlickMick
 
18th January 2009 8:56pm
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Wayne says...
Thanks Mick, will do
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Wayne1
Mackay
19th January 2009 4:23pm
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SlickMick says...
Wayne, you mentioned earlier that you were interested in how they reworked old mango trees. This article comes from http://www.agric.wa.gov.au/content/HORT/FN/CP/FN066_1987.PDF. At the end of the article it quotes "Reworking
Many of the common or Turpentine mangoes already
established in the north-west of Western Australia could
be reworked to named varieties. This is more successful
if the tree is in good condition and shows no sign of dead
wood or stunting.
Firstly, the old trunk is cut off at a point 40 to 80 cm above
ground level, and the cut surface coated with Colgraft®
or similar material. Shoots will develop from around the
trunk. When these have reached ideal size (7 to 10 mm)
three or four can be grafted as described already.
However, as grafting takes place in a field situation, it is
necessary to shade the graft to prevent the scion being
sunburned and dried out. A brown paper bag is ideal for
this purpose. It can be removed when enough new
growth has taken place."
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SlickMick
 
19th January 2009 4:58pm
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Wayne says...
The link didn't work for me Mick, but, not to worry, I will find it.

That is very interesting that they talk about using Turpentine mangoes for the stock root and I'm wondering why. Turpentine mangoes, although they look beautiful, have the most vile taste but I guess the flavour might not carry in to the new fruit.

I have this young tree begging for a graft as well [see photo] but unsure with what yet.
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Picture: 1
  
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Wayne1
Mackay
19th January 2009 6:33pm
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SlickMick says...
I think that the new wood grafted into the turpentine stock produces fruit true to type of the scion and so no characteristics of the stock would come through. Just my humble opinion :)

I imagine the tree in the pic is a seedling of some sort and you have to decide what to put on it. I would try something that you dont have already and see how it goes.
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SlickMick
 
19th January 2009 6:45pm
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Jo says...
Hey -Me again! I haven't written in for about a year, last year I ended up with 4 big juicy mangoes..I only spotted one the whole time in writing this before and one day there were 3 on the ground.Don't know where they were hiding.....
Anyway since it budded in November 08 we have been religiously spraying with copper spray and watering everyday and there are a stack of mangoes on the tree some are massive and some are small but at least 50 or more....looks like the copper spray did the trick!! Can't wait to eat them all!
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Jo3
NSW
20th January 2009 8:13pm
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SlickMick says...
I am green with envy :)
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SlickMick
 
20th January 2009 8:50pm
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Dianna says...
Hello to Mitch in Florida. I think you have a case of sooty mould, this is a by-product of scale insects, they suck the sap out of the tree, then exude a sugary substance, the sooty mould grows on that. Spray with white-oil or pest-oil, this kills the scale insects, then the sooty mould will curl up and fall off by itself.
Wayne, in Mackay - would you like to come round and prune some trees for me?
Robyn in Byron Bay - have you fertilised your trees? (in December, and in February)
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Dianna
Greenbank Qld
22nd January 2009 4:58pm
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cloudman says...
Hi
This is my mango tree after 3 years!
Do mango trees normally grow this slow? This is my first to try to grow. And sadly I would say it has grown the most this year, but that still is not much.
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psycloud
Texas coast
24th January 2009 6:39am
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Wayne says...
At a guess cloudman, I would say that your poor tree is root bound in the pot and needs planting out urgently.
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Wayne1
Mackay
24th January 2009 5:20pm
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cloudman says...
Hi Wayne

I think it was root bound in the original pot I had, and I moved it to this very large pot about 2 years ago, and the first year it was in this pot it did nothing, it had about 6 leaves at that time, and during the course of the year they same 6 leaves stayed on the year, none of them died, but the tree did not do anything. This year it has got some new leaves and is slowly growing.
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psycloud
Texas coast
25th January 2009 2:50am
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macleaymac says...
Folks there is sooo much stuff about mangos that is pure conjecture. e.g the weather, the wind, the water. The reasons for fruit drop and failure to fruit can be none of the above.These plants stress easily through any lack of minerals/ plant food, water, wind at the wrong time, insect attack etc.Please read what the govt site has to say.
http://www2.dpi.qld.gov.au/horticulture/5359.html

Suggest you give a liberal dressing of gypsum at the drip line. Mangos need the calcium from it.
Then one wet day sprinkle some chelated iron if your land is sandy. OR a multi mineral pack to ensure the land is not deficient in boron etc. I throw some epsom salts around as well.
AND know you are not alone:-
from qcl.farmonline.com.au
Queensland’s mango harvest is well underway but yields are not looking good for the tropical fruit.
This season has been unpredictable with some areas of the Northern Territory coming on as early as late August and other areas of Queensland, including Burdekin, starting harvest weeks later then usual.

Australia Mango Industry Association’s industry development manager Trevor Dunmall said the season has started in sporadically, but one thing most areas have in common is lower yields on certain varieties.

"There has been widespread flowering, some mangoes coming on early, some coming on late," Mr Dunmall said.

"It appears Kensington Pride and R2E2 orchards are experiencing low yields this season.

"Other varieties appear to have produced stable amounts."

Last season the Queensland mango industry produced around $80 million worth of fruit.

Mr Dunmall said it is not yet clear whether the shortfall in yields will greatly reduce the overall crop worth.

"We do expect it to be down slightly, but prices could be better and then make up for some of the yield loss," Mr Dunmall said.

"The harvest for all areas of Queensland should be completed in March and we won't really know until then what the full affect has been."

Some producers in the Bowen region have recorded crop losses on R2E2 of around 30pc, while varieties such as Honey Gold, grown exclusively in Bowen by Euri Gold Farms for Pinata Group have not had decreased yields at all.

The overall quality of fruit this season is expected to be high.

Finally I have espallia'd a bowen mango to keep the height down to a managable size for an old gardener.




Queensland Country Life
Source: http://www.queenslandcountrylife.com
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macleaymac
macleay island brisbane
26th January 2009 4:06pm
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macleaymac says...
Here's a link to the web site of Annette mcfarlane. The articles answer a lot of the above questions:
http://www.annettemcfarlane.com/Stories/Mangoes.pdf
As it's a pdf file you may have to go to her site as above, then click stories, then select mangos.
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macleaymac
macleay island brisbane
26th January 2009 4:13pm
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kerri says...
Hi,
I would like some info on growing mangoes. I live south of Perth. Where I am the soil (or sand) is very alkine so is the bore water. If I wanted to put one in the ground is there a way it would live. Also it is windy. I know that on one tag that i read it said i needed to add gyspam (think that is how you spell it), is for clay. Dolimit and a few other things i can't remember.
Would it be better in a pot or in the gound. What could I add to help?. Or any other info would be a great help.
Cheers
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kerri
Rockingham WA
4th February 2009 10:23pm
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Wayne says...
Doesn't look like you have much going for a Mango tree Kerri. How alkaline is your soil? you can get a probe tester for around $14 from Bunnings to test it. To make your soil more acidic add sulphur or sulphate of ammonia. Mango trees also do not like strong winds, especially around flowering time.
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Wayne1
Mackay
5th February 2009 4:55am
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bobren888 says...
we owned mango farm here in philippines...we used organic chemicals to make mango tree fruiting....if you want just PM me i can help you solve your problem....send me ur quires at bobren27@gmail.com
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bobren888
philippines
11th February 2009 1:29pm
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kerri says...
Hi
Our ph is high end of the alkine scale and we get strong winds to which won't help me out either, I was thinking of a dwarf one in a big pot. In a corner behind the shed where there will be protection. What do you thing?
Cheers kerri
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25th February 2009 3:58pm
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Bob_S_Miami says...
To Mitch in Miami - You have sooty mold on the leaves. You can spray the tree with Liquid Copper Fungicide, or you can simply wash it off with soap and water. Both methods work, & I'd recommend the soap first, followed by the liquid copper for good measure. The liquid copper is good for Anthracnose as well. I have 2 trees, a Valencia Pride and an Edward. Both have flowered heavily this year, and both are usually reliable producers.
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Starman535
Miami, FL
26th March 2009 1:30am
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joewigan says...
I havent taken pics yet but will, I was just experimenting becouse i thought i wouldnt be able to grow one in the uk but started in small pot 6" with pollybag over it,Since removing the bag the leafs where really shinny now they started to curl at the ends anything i could do for this lovely plant,it has six leaves on it at the mo, i need help please,,,,joe
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joewigan
England uk
8th April 2009 8:45am
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Ellen says...
joewigan

put the polybag over it again, Mango plants loves heat
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Ellen
Smithfield
8th April 2009 12:03pm
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joewigan says...
Thanks ELLEN very usefull i thought it might have been somat else i'd killed. lol
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joewigan1
uk
12th April 2009 9:30am
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Ryan says...
Hi,

I have a 3 year old Mango Tree in a small pot. I want to transfer to a permanent large pot. What type of soil / fertalizer should I fill the pot with to provide the best chance of long term success? Any help would be great so I don't kill the poor thing.

Cheers,

Ryan
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Ryan
Perth
14th April 2009 5:53pm
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Daza says...
Hi
I have good size mango tree. The neighbours have told me that it fruits well.Last year the tree flowered well but most of the flowers went black and left me with one mango, it was nice but not enough.Can someone tell what to feed the tree and what time of the year.
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Newman W.A
14th April 2009 10:43pm
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Dianna says...
Hi Daza, If the flowers went black, then the tree has anthracnose, spray every fortnight from flowering to fruit-picking with a fungus spray, Mancozeb, copper, etc.

Hello Ryan, buy the best quality potting mix you can get. Don't fertilise it when you've repotted, wait until it has settled in, then use an organic fertiliser, "organic" because it's in a pot and there's less chance of harming it with chemicals.

Hi JoeWigan - if you're in Wigan, mate, good luck! Have you considered moving to somewhere a bit warmer and sunnier?

Cheers from Sunny Queensland.
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Dianna
Greenbank in Queensland
15th April 2009 5:14pm
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Ryan says...
Thanks for the good advice Dianna. I will be transfering the Mango Tree to a 70 Litre pot this weekend.

Our Local nursery suggested mixing the potting mix with some sheep manure and a small amount of blood and bone. I'm not sure how experienced they are with Mango Trees - they don't keep any in stock.
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Ryan
Perth
15th April 2009 10:55pm
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Dianna says...
Hello Ryan - it's not just mango trees, don't fertilise anything if you've just transplanted it. If you want to use the sheep manure and blood and bone, mix them together now and let it compost down a bit. That mix would be high in nitrogen, you would then need some superphosphate to encourage flowering and fruit. Then some potash for general good health, etc. Don't forget a bit of Trace Element Mix.

I wonder how Joe is going with his mango tree in England? If he's kept it going through one winter, there might be hope yet! (oh, I know, global warming)
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Dianna
Greenbank in Queensland
18th April 2009 6:13pm
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Valencia says...
I have a Valencia Mango. Just purchased about 3 months ago about 6 ft tall. Stem is about an inch thick. has grown about 40 new leaves. All I hear is that it is a huge tree. Is that right? I'm afraid that it doesn't rain enough here about 23 inches per year. Although I do water it every 2-3 days.
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Valencia
mcallen Texas USA
21st April 2009 4:28am
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Dianna says...
Hello Valencia, What type of mango do you have? The old fashioned 'turpentine' mango trees are huge! But the newer hybrid types are smaller and better behaved. If your tree is in the ground, make sure you put lots of mulch around (not against the trunk), to keep the moisture in the soil, they like lots of water. Give it a good drink once a week in Spring when they are supposed to be flowering and fruiting.
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Greenbank Queensland
25th April 2009 8:10am
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Bob In Miami says...
Valencia - I have one of those trees here in Miami - It does get pretty tall, & needs regular trimming to keep it from getting too big. It, like all mangos, is fully tropical and cannot stand freezing. At my location, we get 40 - 50" of rain annually, most falling MJJASO. The rest of the year, we usually get less than 5", so frequent watering while the tree is fruiting is necessary if natural rainfall is insufficient.

Rainfall when the tree is in flower (or a freeze) is bad

Good luck.
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Starman535
Miami, FL
3rd May 2009 12:45pm
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Nat says...
Hi. I planted a small mango tree last spring - and it has not grown at all! I kept it watered well and it gets a lot of sun (but not full sun). I don't know why it hasn't grown anything new in a whole year, but yet doesn't look like it died.

Does it take time to start to develop? It's only about 3 feet tall.
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Nat
Southern California
5th May 2009 3:08pm
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amanda says...
We live on a hill 1km from ocean. It's hot, windy and semi-arid. We have alkaline yellow 'brickies' sand. I improve my soil with an acidic clay from the brick-works - it's been the best thing I have ever done for our gutless, water-repellant sand. I mulch with pine-bark for fruit trees that don't like alkalinity and use heaps of manure. My friend was commercial mangoe grower in Carnarvon he says: they grow slow and only in summer when it's hot. Withold water and fertilisers prior to flowering (hard for us cos it's our rainy season - remember they flower in the tropical dry) then when fruit set water heaps. Mine are doing ok - don't like the wind but soil is no problem - they are healthy but slow (3 kensingtons - the only one he suggests growing sub-tropical and temperate)Have also read on many occasions that you don't give mature trees fertiliser - is this true?
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amanda19
geraldton WA
10th May 2009 5:21pm
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Dianna says...
Hello Amanda, "don't give mature trees fertiliser" - this sounds too much like an urban myth. If you have perfect soil, then maybe you wouldn't need to fertilise. But if you've got anything else, surely you would have to give the tree all the nutrients it needs, including trace elements and potash, if you want to have a good crop and a healthy tree.

I wonder if our overseas friends understand 'tropical dry'?

Happy Gardening.
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Greenbank Qld
14th May 2009 10:41am
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joe says...
Hi Dianna, Its still growing,just got back from croatia to-nite and thought why we was there wish i had brought my plant along, the weather was brill, unlike rainy old england, Oh i got two plants going now, Keep you informed on plants. regards, joe.
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14th May 2009 11:54am
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amanda says...
Yup dianna - I am inclined to agree - but....must state that we lived in Cairns for 5 yrs and our big old mangoe trees got zilch - nice soil but totally leached by heavy (heavy!) rain - they were laden every year.
I may be a dag but I am a big fan of Peter Cundalls advice - spoilt trees don't flower - there is no need for them to.
If u have or use clay and straw - lots K+ - if u use manures - no need for trace elements. Just make sure they get enough N and some P. If u have deficiencies - it's most likely your soil chemistry is not right.
To Nat in S.Cal - give it as much sun, water and food as u can - i suspect your climate may be similar to ours? (dry n hot) Once these guys get their 'roots down' they take off. Water long and deeply to encourage this. They will never find the ground water otherwise - u will have very drought tolerant trees if u can get them off to a good start. So what is your climate like? I'd be interested to hear - as it's suggested it's similar to West Australia (true mediterranean)?
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amanda19
geraldton WA
14th May 2009 8:56pm
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Nat says...
Hi Amanda,

Thanks for the tip. After reading many of the notes - I've started watering more and a lot more deeply. I have to buy some food for it. My fear is that we don't have enough hot sun. Living by the beach - it is only about 70 degrees F each day. I hope that's not it... but I'll give it another year of water & food to see if it takes off. If not I might have to give up.
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Nat
Southern California
16th May 2009 7:18am
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Fran says...
Reading your post may have given me the answer to the problems our mango tree has been having. We purchased it at a local plan nursery about eight years ago. Two years after planting, it had three mangoes and two the year after. The following year we had a hurricane and the tree hasn't had a mango since then. However, after reading your post, it may be because our mango tree is right next to our septic tank AND we've been watering it! It has had massive leaf and branch die-back. I will try the miracle grow treatment and give it one more chance.
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Fran1
Bahamas
24th May 2009 8:26am
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amanda says...
Hi Fran - I'm no expert but if it's feeding off the septic then I wouldn't fertilise it...(it may even be wrecking your septic...?) Established Mangoe trees that are over fertilised produce vegetative growth rather than fruit. Feed and water once it's flowering or setting fruit and then again after harvest - otherwise leave it alone. It's probably not a good idea to fertilise it if it's still sick either.

Young mangoe trees need a lot of feeding and watering to get them going. Maybe you should wait n see...and get your tanks etc checked for root invasion too! :)
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amanda19
geraldton. WA
24th May 2009 8:01pm
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Susan says...
I was having a problem like this. Actually this year I got some blooms and it started to bear fruit and then they all fell off. A friends husband sugested Liquid Copper Fungicide, can be purchased at home depot or lowes. This is the first year I am actually getting some where! I had to apply everyday for the first week, directly on the blooms and then once a week for the next two months. Apparently mango trees get some kind of fungus that doesn't allow them to bear fruit or the fruit falls off before it is ready! Hope it works for you.
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Susan9
Florida
30th May 2009 8:16am
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Fran says...
I'm just about ready to give up on it and plant another. Will probably give it another month or so.
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Fran1
Bahamas
1st June 2009 11:40am
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randey says...
i dont neccessarily recommend this but a burmese friend of mine suggested that i belt my white sapote with the back of an axe to shock it into fruiting eg. help i`m under attack, better reproduce to save my species. it worked and the next month lo and behold....flowers galore which turned into about 20 fruit. and it hasn`t stopped fruiting.the alternative is to stand next to it with a chainsaw and wave it menacingly in its direction.....just kidding
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randey
perth
5th June 2009 8:44am
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Ruben says...
Every year these small white insects (moths?) show up on our mangos and on the stems. I'm convinced that these little guys harm the fruit but I don't know how. Some of our mangos fall off while still green and sometimes they appear to be rotting from the inside out, at the seeds. We have a ficus hedge near our tree and I have also seen these in the ficus. They only seem to come on the mango tree after it has flowered. Can anyone tell me what these are and tell me more about them? Is there a safe way to control them?
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Ruben
Ft. Lauderdale, FL
5th June 2009 10:48am
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amanda says...
Hi randey - Speedy mentioned whacking the tree too - he said something to do with tree releasing hormones in response?

As an aside - My white sapote is going really well - 3yrs now - but are they always such a buggar to prune? I can't seem to get it to make a good shape..are they always whippy n bendy? Did yours have this problem and did it carry the fruit ok?
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amanda19
geraldton.WA
5th June 2009 10:50am
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Speedy says...
Ruben,
I can't quite see them properly (photo a bit blurry) ,but those insects look like some sort of leafhopper.
An insect that sucks the sap of plants.
The fallen fruit may have succumbed to a disorder known as 'jellyseed'.
I'm not sure what causes it ,
but some cvs. are more susceptible than others.
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Speedy
Swan Hill, Vic
5th June 2009 11:17am
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randey says...
hi amanda, just thought i`d look in on the forum to see whats happening re: sapote. and yes my tree grew to about 4m and it was a bugger to prune, so i got one of those long handled pruners, a secateur on a stick and that made it so much easier. even though the limbs are quite spindly they had no trouble supporting the weight of the fruit, with some clumps having up to 7-8 fruit. BUT BEWARE when they get too ripe the last thing you want is to be standing under one when it drops. SPLAT. i also bought myself a long handled fruit harvester, basically a bag on a pole with a plastic ring around the top with notches in the side to allow the stems to be caught and twisted off, and the fruit falls into the bag. talk to you soon.
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randey
perth
7th June 2009 9:17pm
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amanda says...
Thanks Randey...must watch for the 'splat' factor :))

I just hacked mine....oops..but it's a tough so n so - it handles everything that Gero' that throws at it and keeps coming back for more... I think it's one of the toughest fruit trees I have!

I have one lemon gold only - but interested in planting more - what have u got?
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amanda19
geraldton.WA
7th June 2009 10:44pm
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randey says...
hi amanda.unfortunately, the same as yours. but the good thing is the the seeds are so easy to propogate. i always had to pick up my deadfalls so as they wouldnt rot and take root. i must say that just about everywhere i visit on the forum i see geraldton amanda. you, like me seem to have a smorgasbord of fruit trees and the knowledge to go with them. nice to speak to someone with a like interest
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randey
perth
11th June 2009 6:34pm
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amanda says...
Hi Randey - I reckon that we are quite lucky from Perth and north that we can actually grow quite an amazing variety of fruit. We have the same growing days as Brisbane+ -but no weird hail storms/frost. And despite our crappy sand - it does drain well - a huge bonus in the long run.

Without wanting to sound wishy-washy - my 'feeling' is to improve the top-soil with organics and clay etc to improve it's water retention/humus levels and leave the sandy sub-soil alone - due to it's good drainage. Best of both worlds maybe??

I am really impressed with the white sapote and yes I think I am a Daleys forum addict!!? :))
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amanda19
geraldton.WA
11th June 2009 9:30pm
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leekahjun says...
ok
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14th June 2009 1:00pm
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randey says...
hi amanda, you were asking about different varieties before. i said i only had the white but on reflection i do have a "black" sapote though in truth it is really a member of the persimmon family, grows to the size of a medium sized apple and when ripe is chocolate brown inside. it`s often referred to as the choclate pudding plant and is absolutely delicious mixed with ice cream and yes it also is affected with the SPLAT factor
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randey
perth
15th June 2009 11:07pm
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ian says...
i have a mango tree in my back yard ive only lived here for 6 weeks the neibour says its never fruited and he has been here for 30 years i think its not that old but its 25 foot high healthy looking nice green leaves looks like it has some flower buds happening how can i get this tree to fruit please help ,iwill never get rid of it its shades the miniture rainforest under and around it ,but it would be nice to get some fruit i love mangoes
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ian11
bribie island
30th July 2009 11:19am
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BobbyB says...
If you think that those are flower buds then try to get some potash (sometimes with manganese is less expensive) and give it every 30 days through the fruiting to promote the fruit. Do not give regular fertizler as it has nitrogen which promotes growth not flowers and fruit. You need to have bees to pollinate or you won't get fruit no matter how many flowers you have. Good luck!
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BobbyB
Maimi Fl
1st August 2009 9:20am
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rolf says...
Potasium is a must but dont make the mistake I made, when the flowers came out I sparayed the blowflies these are the polinators since then I have been very fortunate with fruit encourage flies, aparently the flowers are not a nice smell to us, old piece of meat works, at the moment I have new shoots and should have flowers in late spring for fruit in december.
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dapto nsw
1st August 2009 9:29am
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amanda says...
I wonder if cincturing a branch might work for a mangoe tree too? (see 3 posts up - Ian) anyone tried it?
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
1st August 2009 11:47am
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SeaLady says...
Hi All, I wanted to comment of several different issues I read here, we are taught here in Melbourne - Florida that is never to fertilize your mango once it flowers because you will encourage leaf growth and not fruit. Though potash is suppose to be pretty good for them. But your soil there may be very different, here we have a lot of sand, but are told once established mango's don't need much because this is the enviornment they are use to.

As to a lack of production - I have 8 varieties of mango, the Nam Doc Mai is my most prolific - the fruit actually hangs in clusters like grapes - I got over 500 mango's from that tree this year.

I have a Julie, still small but abut 20 fruit, a Keitt which is a large mango and late season, the tree does not get enough sun so it is not as big as it could be, but still about 20 fruit - I need to cut the mulberry for more sun.

I have a mystery mango that is very large, but only has produced 30 fruit - a good rule of thumb is you MUST cut out a foot of good wood from the tree each year for every inch of trunk. So if your trunk is 6" you should cut about 6 feet of good mature wood out of the tree.

Mango's also need good air flow thru the canopy so cutting some in the center of the tree can help.

I also have a Beverly and a Southern Blush which are probably the best tasting mango's, sweet juicy, no fiber but they are my worst producers - maybe 10 - 15 mango's on these two trees.

I am going to beat them this fall - to do just what someone else mentioned above - threaten them within an inch of their lives - it does stress the tree and it believes it needs to produce as it is going to die.

I also have a Malika, first year fruiting - got about 12 large mango's from it - it is unusual in that you must pick the fruit and ripen it off the tree or they will not taste good.

My newest is a Pickering - it is suppose to have a bit of a coconut flavor to it.

I need to spray with the copper next year, too many blossoms fell off and on some trees a lot of black spots. I live out on our barrier island so get a lot of wind and salt spray which contributes to blossom drop.

Also as far as I know, if you grow a mango from seed you have a 50/50 chance of getting that mango vs it's root stock, so you may end up growing a turpintine mango.

I also grow mulberries, coconut, pineapple, cinnamon, allspice, limequat, passion fruit and 20 varieties of banana.

I do have questions on how to harvest my cinnamon - it is about 15' tall and how to get my passion fruit to flower.

My sweet calabash passion fruit is new and is producing, this is a hard shelled fruit, I have never had this kind before, the first one I opened didn't seem to be ripe, the next one had dried up, how does one know when to open them to eat?

I've tried cutting back the passion fruit before and have gotten it last year to flower and did hand pollination, but no flowers this year.

Sorry for such a long post, but I found your site most interesting.
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SeaLady
Florida
2nd August 2009 6:43am
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Carol says...
What makes them split
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Carol12
Pine Creek darwin
3rd August 2009 3:20pm
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Anna says...
Hi Carol,

I think the tree has received too much water.
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Melbourne
3rd August 2009 5:41pm
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randey says...
hi carol, i thought i was doing my kensington a favour by giving it copious amounts of water during its early fruit forming stage, until i noticed that some of the more mature fruit started to swell and split. i immediately stopped the watering and was lucky enough to only have about 6 that actually split. i resumed watering after about a week and a half but regulated the supply and was rewarded with about 4 dozen fat juicy mangoes. now the thing is because you live in darwin you would be getting big mobs of water in the rainy season. is the plant in a pot or in the ground, can make a difference re drainage
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randey
perth
3rd August 2009 11:10pm
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BobbyB says...
-- Try the Cushman mango - the best!! big round turns yellow with some blush when ripe. I have 17 different kinds of mangos and basically I won't eat anything else!! MY Keit has/had 200 mangos this year and it is only about 15 feet tall... regarding seedlings.. the way that you get a new cultivar is to let the seed sprout then graft the bud wood from it to a mature tree. If the fruit is good then you name it and there you go. takes a long time and not a really high probability of success. Usually it reverts back to the rootstock.
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Miami,fl
8th August 2009 12:00pm
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macleaymac says...
Nothing has been said so far about applying gypsum. This is applied liberally in the spring (hopefully when there is water around) as mangoes need calcium.
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macleaymac
macleay Island brisbane
8th August 2009 7:18pm
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Steve says...
I live in a unit in Brisbane and have a large patio so I planted a Bowen Mango tree. It started to grow very well and I had a lot of new growth. But abiut two weeks ago I noticed that most of the new leaves we being eaten by something. I do not see any insects or anything on the underside of the leaves. We are in the city and I have not seen any wild animals. We are two levels up from the ground and have not seen any birds.
Do you have any ideas on what it may be and what I can do?
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Steve18
Brisbane
11th August 2009 7:55am
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Ellen says...
Steve

becareful just because your are living at a high height level doesn't mean that you're safe from LOCUST
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Ellen
Smithfield
11th August 2009 9:16am
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amanda says...
I agree Ellen - looks like a big greedy grasshopper has had a feast! They eat my dracena like this from time to time (not sure why that plant - there's much nicer goodies around!?)
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
11th August 2009 9:28am
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northguys says...
Hi, When we moved here 8 years ago there was a Bowen mango in the backyard, about 5m high and I guess well over 10-15 years old and used to be laden with fruit, over the last 3-4 years there has been hardly any new growth, the tree has been cut back pretty drastically but we are getting no new leaves let alone flowers or fruit. With our water restrictions it is hard to give it more water, we have used blood & bone but not that often. Any suggestions.....I will try to get some photo's on here tomorrow. Really appreciate any suggestions before my partner gets the tree loppers in.
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northguys
Brisbane
24th October 2009 7:25pm
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Original Post was last edited: 25th October 2009 5:27pm
Wayne says...
The first thing coming to mind is termites, some photos would be good.
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Wayne1
Mackay QLD
24th October 2009 7:53pm
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northguys says...
Hi there, I have loaded some pics of the tree we have trouble with, anyone have any ideas on what we should do to save this tree.
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northguys
Brisbane
29th October 2009 9:27am
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Wayne says...
That tree looks like it is dieing, at a guess starved to death by those palms. In photo 1 - cut those two vertical limbs in the centre right back to within 6" of the trunk.

In photo 4 - cut those limbs going upwards. What you should end up with is low hanging branches with leaves, if a limb hasn't got leaves cut it off and don't be afraid of hurting the tree.

If you want you can cut them all off right back leaving just those forks on above the tree, then paint the tree with a water based white paint.

If it becomes evident that the palms are killing the tree you could hire a trencher and dig a trench 3' deep between the palms and the tree and fill it with concrete. Have a scratch around close to the tree and see if there are any palm roots there, they are surface feeders.

I'll see if I can find some more info for you but that tree sure is sick
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Wayne1
Mackay QLD
29th October 2009 9:54am
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Original Post was last edited: 29th October 2009 10:06am
Wayne says...
As you can see they can withstand a big chop, this photo is of R2E2 branches grafted on to a Bowen mango trunk
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Wayne1
Mackay QLD
29th October 2009 10:00am
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Tropicdude says...
Stress will stimulate flowering in a mango tree, of course this should be timed so that flowering and fruiting coincides with the normal season of that tree. if your always watering your mango tree, it will never be stressed that way, and will just grow to be a big barren tree! also lots of rain when flowers appear is also bad, fungus on flowers, and pollen wash will reduce fertilization.

here is an excerpt from "fruit growing in the tropics"

"Since growth comes first, stimulating growth is unlikely to improve
flowering and fruiting. For instance: watering a mango tree during the
dry season to avoid stress will lead to more flushing at the expense of
flowering. Figure 2 shows the rapid increase in branching of a mango
tree growing in ever-wet conditions; the tree did not flower at all."

"Stress and seasonal yield
While the grower of single-stemmed fruit crops does his best to make
sure that his crops do not suffer stress, for intermittently growing
branched fruit trees a period of stress is in fact welcome – or necessary.
A period of unfavourable weather, like a cold or dry season, stops
shoot growth and gives the twigs time to initiate floral buds. Low
temperature is more effective than drought, as can be shown by comparing
fruit crops such as citrus, mango and avocado, which grow in
the subtropics as well as in the tropics"

"Citrus, mango and avocado in the tropics and subtropics
For all three crops, a rule of thumb is that in the tropics the trees grow twice
as fast and yield only half as much as in the subtropics. In the tropics the dry
season often does not check shoot growth effectively, resulting in large trees
and insufficient twig rest to ensure good flowering and fruiting. In the subtropics,
winter does stop shoot growth; moreover it stimulates formation of floral
buds, resulting in small, profusely flowering trees. But in the subtropics inclement
springtime weather often leads to poor fruit set. And if fruit sets well
this may lead to overbearing and shortage of shoots that flower next year, resulting
in biennial bearing"

Anyway, there are many methods to cause stress, and ADO5 ( Agrodok 5 ) has many explanations on how to do this. the idea is to stop flushing and stimulate flowersgrowth at the proper time of year to synchronize the tree, things like fertilizer and rain/watering do all the opposite !

Here in the Dominican Republic, we have excellent mangoes, this is due to the fact that our dry season coincides with our winter/early spring. this means that trees will flower and get fertilized before the rainy season or watering. the best mangoes production here grow in areas that get less rain!

Once tree has fruits, go ahead and water if necessary.
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Tropicdude
 
30th October 2009 7:55am
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northguys says...
Hi Wayne, Thanks very much for the information, I wasn't sure how much we could cut it back without hurting the tree, but after seeing the pic you loaded and your comments it will get a good cut back and will also paint it, should the whole tree be painted, all branches, including those that do have leaves ? Also will have a look and see about the roots from the palms, do you suggest feeding it ? and if so what and how often would you say ?
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northguys
Brisbane
31st October 2009 8:35pm
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BadHabits says...
Any suggestion about what is causing the damage to my mango leaf? After a while the circle dies and leaved a hole in the leaf.
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Bad Habits
Fort Lauderdale
22nd November 2009 7:42am
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Damo says...
mango leafhopper?
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Damo
 
22nd November 2009 10:14am
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joe wigan says...
Hi Diana just an update, the mango is doing fantastic, not growing as fast as a daisy but doing well all the same.
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Wigan UK
28th November 2009 9:31am
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joe wigan says...
Picture of mango, about 7 months since planting, Joe
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Wigan, UK
28th November 2009 9:35am
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Gary says...
Hi,

We have a mango tree which we just bought couple of months back. It started getting flowers and new leaves. But after a few days , all of them very nicely eaten (It might be Possum). Now the tree is not growing at all. I ahve already applied cow manure couple of times. Anything I can do to help getting the growth.

Rgds,
Gaurav
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Gary10
sydney
16th December 2009 3:54pm
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Wayne says...
That is a shame Gary, you need to get rid of the critter eating the leaves. Possums will eat the flowers but I don't know if they would eat leaves.

I trust you have it in the ground, not in a pot, so don't be to concerned just yet but make sure you protect it. Perhaps with some wire netting around it, if you have a dog get it to camp out near the tree, or a possum trap?

Good luck
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Wayne1
Mackay
16th December 2009 4:27pm
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Brenda says...
When my husband and I lived in West Palm Beach we had six huge Hayden mango trees in our yard. We called it "The Mango Plantation". We never did a thing for those trees -- no fertilizer, no pruning, no spraying -- and they bore enormous amounts of glorious fruit every year. Then we moved a few miles north and planted a single mango tree. This tree I fertilize and coddle and it has yet to bear fruit even though it is quite large and has lots of blooms. I think it was started from seed, so maybe that explains it. Good luck with your mango trees. I wish I knew what made my old trees produce so well so I could pass on the tips. We often allowed the leaves to stay on the ground. That's the only thing I can think of that was unusual.
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Brenda3
Palm Beach County Florida
7th January 2010 4:11pm
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uptown says...
My mangoe treeis 6 years old and is about 2 meters high.The trouble i am having is that the leaves are turning brown from the tip of the leaf to about halfway back to the trunk.So i have aleaf that is half green and the other brown and curling .Please can anyone help me as i am in love with this tree
Regards TOM.
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uptown
WINDAROO QLD
11th January 2010 6:52pm
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Wayne says...
Hello Tom, it seems your tree lacks Gypsum which is the reason the leaves are dying from the tips. Spread Gypsum around under the canopy then blood & bone fertiliser, then do this every two months or so.

The tree should be more than 2m tall after 6 years so I would suggest a good all round fertiliser such as Terrafoska TE or you can make your own.
2 Blood and bone
1 Epsom salts
1 Sulphate of potash
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Wayne1
Mackay QLD
11th January 2010 8:24pm
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Original Post was last edited: 11th January 2010 8:27pm
Phil says...
Hi. I'm so grateful we found this site as we do not know what to do with our tree. We bought our house last June in Brisbane and we loved that it had a large mango tree in the backyard. It is a large tree maybe 6 metres tall and I've got no idea how old it is but it did look a bit sick. There were a lot of barren branches and the leaves that were there, were wilting, had spots and holes (see pics) However we thought that come summer, it would perk up again.

From the pictures you can see that while it has picked up a bit (some new green leaves) the leaves are all wilting and turning brown and there are still some older leaves with the spots. Still a very barren tree.

I also found some ants burrowing into the tree.

We aren't looking for the tree to bear fruit, we just want it to be healthy to provide shade/cover for years to come, hopefully. I hope there is a way to save it. We are grateful for any advice you can give.
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Phil11
Oxley QLD
16th January 2010 4:57pm
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amanda says...
I have never seen ants make nests inside a tree b4....that looks bad. Can u afford to get a horticulturalist or someone in to look at the tree? It might be worth it.
It's not white ant is it?
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
16th January 2010 8:30pm
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Phil says...
They are black ants not white ants. Is it that bad? How much does a horticulturalist cost and could anyone recommend someone local to me?
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Phil11
Oxley QLD
17th January 2010 12:55am
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amanda says...
Hi Phil - it should not cost too much. If it were my tree - I would be having a good look at that ant nest...the branch would have to be dead/dry etc for them to get in there. Are they just in the bark or right into the branch? Is the branch dead? saw it off if it is - and treat the ants asap.
I'd be giving that tree a heap of water first up. It looks dry and defoliated and very unhealthy.
Are u having a drought there?
Try your nearest agriculture dept etc - they will look at photo's etc - all free.
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
17th January 2010 1:36am
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Wayne says...
That is one very old and very neglected tree, all that dead wood needs to come off but it's hard to describe where to start. Looking at pic. 3 I would be inclined to take out those limbs going vertical from about 2/3 the way up first, then take out all the other dead wood. Make sure you seal the cuts with branch sealer.

I'm sure those black ants are just in the bark so hit them with Crunchy Crawler or something like that.

Then a complete fertiliser with trace elements and probably some sulphate of potash extra and as Amanda says a good regular watering.

I don't think that tree has anthracnose, a common mango tree disease, but does have aphids and some of the leaf browning is caused by lack of food.

Now is the time to do it Phil as the tree is budding, or, get some help from a professional.

Good luck and please let us know how you get on.
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Wayne1
Mackay QLD
17th January 2010 6:38am
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Original Post was last edited: 17th January 2010 7:58am
Diana says...
Hi Phil, Amanda and Wayne,

Water would not seem to be the problem, as we had four weeks of rain every day in Brisbane during December and January which ended about a week and a half ago, and gardens are still lush.

Diana.
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Brisbane (Kenmore)
17th January 2010 8:40am
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amanda says...
Maybe that's why it's got new growth? It's too hard for me phil :( is there a nursery near you who may be able to recommend someone to have a look?
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
17th January 2010 10:53am
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Wayne says...
Hey Diana

"Water would not seem to be the problem, as we had four weeks of rain every day in Brisbane during December and January which ended about a week and a half ago,"

That's fair enough, but the tree needs something to eat as well, had you been fertilising during the wet there would have been a considerable difference.

Go ahead with the pruning ASAP
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Wayne1
Mackay QLD
17th January 2010 6:52pm
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Phil says...
Thanks for all the advice everyone, I think I am going to ask someone to come take a look asap. I will let you know how it goes. Thanks
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Phil11
Oxley QLD
18th January 2010 12:56am
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Wayne says...
Good job Phil, mango trees always seem to be the coolest trees to sit under
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Wayne1
Mackay QLD
18th January 2010 7:26am
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uptown says...
Wayne
Thank you for youe advice regarding my problem.How often and when should i apply your mixture of blood and bone,epsom salts and potash.
regards TOM
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uptown
WINDAROO QLD
20th January 2010 10:47pm
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Original Post was last edited: 20th January 2010 10:48pm
Wayne says...
I would apply it now while it's budding Tom, then after winter and probably again when it starts to flower.

That mix is from Tom Wyatt who is very experienced and well respected up here.
http://www.abc.net.au/profiles/content/s2517467.htm?site=capricornia
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Wayne1
Mackay QLD
21st January 2010 8:20am
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Phil says...
Just an update. I went to the local nursery and they told us to use Seasol and water the tree heavily. So I spread the Seasol (6 buckets diluted) then emptied my water tank onto the tree. She said it would take 3 moths to see the effects. Actually just 1 week later I can see many many more new leaves coming through, so it looks like the tree is saved. Thanks for all your help.
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Phil11
Oxley QLD
25th January 2010 1:27am
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Wayne says...
Seasol on a tree this size is a new one to me Phil and very interesting and if it worked, great. It is that time of year that your tree should be budding and we thought you said the tree had plenty of moisture. I feel you should still cut all that dead wood out and give it a complete fertiliser. Perhaps it might be a bit late for a prune this year, maybe next year.
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Wayne1
Mackay QLD
25th January 2010 6:49am
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Original Post was last edited: 25th January 2010 8:12am
amanda says...
Great Phil! My neighbour has an olive and carob orchard (semi-commercial) he was telling me that he put a heap of seasol thru the retic and is really thrilled with the results - trees went mad he said. (haven't been up to look yet)
Must have cost him a bomb tho' ?!
Like Wayne says - get rid of any dead wood - but maybe let it recover a bit b4 you start hacking it! ;-)
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
25th January 2010 12:41pm
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David says...
We have 2 Black Sapote (very healthy looking)trees in tropical North Queensland. They are at least 10 years old. The problem is that they have never flowered or bourne any fruit. Have tried a pruning. They are about 3 metres high. They were started from seed (not grafted).

Any ideas please. The chain saw is threatening. Help
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David26
 
26th January 2010 8:56am
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Brendan says...
Hi David,
Try giving them some 'Sulphate of Potash' fertilizer.

I'd give them a bit of superphosphate and lots of Gypsum as well.
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
30th January 2010 7:20am
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Caress says...
We ripen ours on our table all the time.
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Caress
Ecuador
28th February 2010 10:32am
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jos says...
Hi, i have a budded mango tree in Nigeria, it is five years old. I had some fruits in the second year after planting but none since. It appears very healthy with lots of shoots every season. It had flowers last year but they all fell with no fruit setting. NO disease on it. Any ideas to help my mango fruit again?
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england
11th April 2010 6:07am
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Wayne says...
Hello Jos

Sounds like a fungus such as Anthracnose [which you can't see to well] is stopping the fruit from setting. Spray weekly with an anti-fungus spray making sure you use a wetting agent as this is most important. Start before the tree flowers and continue until the fruit is 1/4 developed.

A copper based spray such as copper oxichloride is good for this as is mancozeb. You can use a copper based spray until the tree starts to flower and then not until the fruit has set, as it kills the flowers. Mancozeb is OK to use during the flowering stage.

If not a fungus may I suggest a fertiliser such as super phosphate or one to support the fruit.

I don't know what you have there so hope this helps

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Wayne1
Mackay QLD
11th April 2010 9:43am
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Original Post was last edited: 11th April 2010 9:46am
jos says...
Thanks Wayne. What combination of nitrogen-phoshate-potash will you advice which i am hoping to get here in england? there are some made for roses & other plants in different combinations of n-p-p; do you think those will work on the mango?
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englang,UK
12th April 2010 6:42am
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Wayne says...
http://www2.dpi.qld.gov.au/horticulture/5240.html

This link should help you Jos
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Wayne1
Mackay QLD
13th April 2010 12:13pm
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jos says...
Thanks wayne.
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england,uk
15th April 2010 6:48am
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rev says...
“A woman, a dog and a walnut tree, the more you beat them, the better they be”.

bash the tree trunk with som 4 x 2
it stimulates fruiting hormones
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rev1
nth qld
7th June 2010 1:04am
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Diana says...
Hi Rev,

I've heard that too. Does a good beating work for fruit trees generally, or just deciduous ones (or some other category?). Sounds quite amusing for passers by- almost all of mine are in the front yard.

Diana.
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Brisbane
8th June 2010 8:58pm
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Rev says...
well...if its not a bearing tree
then its not going to be a problem
worth a try

re sealady's query

"I do have questions on how to harvest my cinnamon - it is about 15' tall and how to get my passion fruit to flower.
"

cinnamon is grown 2 years, then cut down and the thin trunk has its bark removed. it then coppices/reshhots and the cycle starts over.
a 15' tree is a bit big, its kind of gotten away on you. you could chop it down andhop it coppices

re the passionfruit
not flowering or not setting?
cant help not flowering might be dud vine. even my self sown ones flower within a year.
if not setting get another. p edulis flavicarpa doesnt set as well on its own
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Rev
north qld
21st June 2010 10:08pm
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Rev says...
tidbit of factoid;

the qld DPI has a collection of 400 varieties of mango

imagine eating one of each
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Rev
north qld
21st June 2010 10:10pm
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kert says...
Imagine, with all that information and they cannot answer the question :"which are the most cold-tolerant mango varieties ?"
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sydney
1st July 2010 1:34pm
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Rev says...
well i doubt they could!
seeing as nobody in their right mind would plant a 400 accession mango collection in a frosty cold place LOL.

Im afraid thats up to us crazies to trial!
not so hard if you could graft or want to waste some $
plant Kensington pride as the standard and numerous others.. and off you go

id put my $ on the florida cultivars. Florida gets that bloody cold continental freak weather swing down periodically.
Those or else some from Nepal or the himalayan foothills.
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Rev
North qld
10th July 2010 7:29am
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Wayne says...
Are not many of our mango varieties established from Florida stock?
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Wayne1
Mackay QLD
10th July 2010 5:19pm
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Rev says...
Keitt is a late season cv that i think is from florida

kent
irwin
tommy atkins
haden

they ship very well so are popular wherever mangos are grown for export
I like keitt - reddish purple skin

you should be able to find them
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Rev
North qld
11th July 2010 1:15pm
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Diana says...
New picture
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1
  
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Brisbane
23rd July 2010 11:25pm
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Shemesh says...
Our 50 yr old Mango tree as been sick for three years. No fruit. Leaves are completely black and white insects. We also have a small mango tree in the back of the house and it started to have black spots. Any help would be helpful.

Thanks
Shemesh
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Shemesh
Isreal
24th July 2010 1:27am
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Brendan says...
Hi Shemesh,
Sounds like a number of things wrong with your mango tree. Try spraying with this brew: 30 grams copper oxychloride, 30 grams mancozeb, 30 ml pyrethrum in 4½ litres water, and add a 'good' wetting agent.
Spray once a week for 3 weeks, then spray once a month until it clears up.
You can spray this on flower buds, but NOT on open flowers as it will kill them.
If your trees is flowering, and they're open, wait until the small fruit forms, then start spraying again, once a week for 3 weeks, then spray monthly.
Also, give your tree some sulphate of potash fertilizer.
Don't forget to mulch the ground from near the trunk out to and past the dripline. Make sure the mulch is ~300mm clear of the trunk.
Might pay to give your tree a prune, I'd reduce it's height by about 1/3rd, that should help it bear too.
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
24th July 2010 8:44am
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Original Post was last edited: 24th July 2010 8:59am
Shemesh says...
Thanks we will give it a try.
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Shemesh
Isreal
25th July 2010 1:28am
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VIVEK says...
Dear LAtfi,
I am really amused with you solution I would like you to further elaborate 1.schedule of spray
2.a healthy tree of mango for last 30 yrs not given fruit or even flower,will it fear,its a local village variety in INDIA,my Grand father planted.
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bapu4
INDIA
13th August 2010 4:49am
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barbara says...
hi we have a mangoe tree that has been producing mangoes over the years, but not that many(at least its something though) but this year all the flowers have turned black(dying) and no mangoes are been produced. how can we fix this problem, so the flowers can be healthy so our mangoes can produce???
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barbara6
sydney
26th September 2010 6:03pm
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John Mc says...
Hi Barbara,
Start with Mancozeb plus each fortnight according to the instruction on the packaging. You could have Anthracnose which is caused by a type of fungus. It kills flowers and causes black spots on the fruit.
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26th September 2010 6:36pm
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Wayne says...
I think you are spot on John, I combine Copperoxichloride when spraying with Mancozeb but definetly not while the flowers are setting.

Barbara's trees should be just about flowering so now is the time to act, perhaps once a week even, it won't hurt
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Wayne1
Mackay QLD
26th September 2010 6:43pm
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Chandra says...
Thanks for the tips. My whole family has been trying to have our huge mango tree fruiting for the last few months.
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Chandra
Brisbane
16th October 2010 9:48pm
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jos says...
Anyone has experience with using GA3(gibberellic acid) on mango tree to increase & improve fruit yield?
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jos
England,UK
20th October 2010 12:14am
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Bob says...
HELLO
I HAVE TWO MANGO TREES ONE IS R2E2 IS 4 YEARS OLD AND THE BOWEN 3 YEARS FOR THE LAST TWO SEASONS THE FRUIT HAS BEEN DROPPING AFTER FLOWERING WITHH BLACK SPOTS I HAVE NOTICED THAT THE R2E2 HAS VERY SMALL MANGOS THE SIZE DOLLAR COIN,I HAVE BEEEN SPRAYING WITH MANGOZEB BUT I WAS TOLD THAT IT WOULD FIX THE PROBLEM ,THE BLACK SPOT STILL APPEARS ON THE NEW MANGOS.
MANY THANKS BOB
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Bob14
Baulkham Hills
29th November 2010 12:35pm
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Wayne says...
Now that the fruit has set Bob, you should be using Copperoxichloride mixed with the Mancozeb. Make sure to use a good wetting agent otherwise the spray will not work
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Wayne1
Mackay QLD
29th November 2010 4:03pm
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Bob says...
HELLO WAYNE,
MANY THANKS WILL TRY AND WILL LET YOU KNOW HOW IT WORKS
REGARDS BOB
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Bob14
Baulkham Hills
29th November 2010 6:52pm
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Bob says...
HELLO WAYNE,I USE A HANDY SPRAYER ONLY HOLDS 1/2 LT WHICH IS ENOUGH FOR ONE FLAT SCOOP OF MANGOZEB,IT IS RECOMENDED TO USE FRESH EVERY WEEK, SO HOW MUCH OF THE COPPEROXICHLORIDE MIX DO I USE, AND DO I REPEAT IT ONCE A WEEK UNTIL THE MANGOS ARE PICKED,ALSO WHAT IS A GOOD WETTING AGENT??
REGARDS BOB
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Bob14
Baulkham Hills
30th November 2010 8:49am
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Original Post was last edited: 30th November 2010 8:59am
Wayne says...
Use the same amount of the copperoxi--- in the brew = 1 scoop of each. I use Searles Spredmix as a wetting agent, be it any better than others, I don't know.

The rule of thumb Bob is if your trees are prone to Anthracnose.
Start spraying weekly about a month before flowering starts with both.
As soon as flowering starts cut out the Copperoxi--- because it will kill the flowers. Mancozeb only with the wetting agent.
Once the fruit has set re-introduce the Copperoxi--- and spray weekly until the fruit is at least 1/2 grown
Keep an eye on the tree and make sure the Anthracnose doesn't come back.
To help stop fruit marking after you pick them you can wash them in a Condies Crystal solution
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Wayne1
Mackay QLD
30th November 2010 9:40am
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anony says...
someone has done black magic on your tree>
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1st December 2010 4:11pm
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Geetha says...
I am looking for piper betle wine; where in Sydney can I buy this? do you know of a nursery which sells this
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Geetha
Sydney
3rd December 2010 4:24pm
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gary says...
We want to relocate the mango tree to another location as it was planted next to the garage and inhibits growth (no, not us, previous house owners)

not sure of the age of mango tree. trunk diameter is 100mm at base.
height is 2200mm.

is it too late to relocate the tree?
when is the ideal time?

Should be prune back all branches to relocate?
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gary13
perth
18th December 2010 1:08pm
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Wayne says...
Hello Gary
It depends on how close the tree is to the garage and how much of the root system you can save and do you know what sort of Mango it is, is it worth saving.

Apart from the surface feeders the tree has a tap root so I'm thinking it to be a big job. Personally I wouldn't bother because you will set the tree back to some extent. Go get one of your choice and give it some loving care and it will soon catch up.
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Wayne1
Mackay QLD
20th December 2010 5:13pm
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matty says...
i live in brisbane a have a couple of big bowens in my back yard. we got around 350-400 beautiful mangos last year should i expect the same this year or is it too late?
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brisbane
2nd February 2011 3:49pm
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BJ says...
Sorry matty, unless you have them on your tree now, you arent getting them. All the wet weather this year has totally destroyed the Brisbane mango season. I haven't seen a single mango, even on the mature trees that bore 1000 fruits last year!
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The poster formerly known as...
Brisbane
2nd February 2011 4:22pm
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non says...
my 10 year old mango in my back yard every spring always have lots of flower but all the little tiny fruits always goes black and died
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non
usa california
12th February 2011 12:02pm
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Brendan says...
Hi non, that's Anthracnose. You need to spray with copper oxychloride & Mancozeb Plus, 30 grams of each to 4½ litres of water, with a good wetting agent added.
Spray monthly just before it flowers and as the buds form. When the flowers open, don't use the copper oxychloride, just the mancozeb plus.(and wetter).
After the tiny fruit forms, add the copper back to the spray. Spray weekly for 4 weeks, then monthly untill harvest.
You should be sick of eating mangoes :-)
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
13th February 2011 8:07am
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jim says...
hi my mang tree has the same black dried up ends as your pic did you find out what causes this.My tree has not had any fruit for over two years.
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jim16
 
17th February 2011 3:56pm
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Bob says...
how to stop possum from eating mangos frrom the tree,many thanks Bob
Pictures - Click to enlarge

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Bob14
Baulkham Hills
25th February 2011 7:55pm
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Wayne says...
Hello Bob
I go to the local Council and hire a cat trap whenever I have possum trouble, they are not allowed to call them possum traps
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Wayne1
Mackay QLD
26th February 2011 7:47am
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Kan says...
Hi, I have a small backyard and one of my friend gave me a Bowen Mango tree. I wonder How big this will grow and the diameter of the foliage.
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Kan
Lidcombe
4th March 2011 8:01pm
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Wayne says...
Hi Kan
In 100 years time it will be about 30m tall and 30m wide, so they do grow big
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Wayne1
Mackay QLD
5th March 2011 11:00am
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barry says...
well drained soil is the key
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bullsbrook
5th March 2011 11:25am
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Kelly says...
Please be very careful while spraying Mancozeb. It can be very harmful to your health and has been known to cause cancers in humans.

http://environmentalcommons.org/cetos/criticalhabitat/mancozeb.pdf

"Mancozeb is a cholinesterase inhibitor and can therefore have affects to the nervous system. Symptoms of exposure include fatigue, headache, blurred vision, and nausea. At high doses exposed persons can have convulsions, slurred speech, confusion, and slowed heartbeat"

"Mancozeb is listed as a chemical known by the State of California to cause cancer in humans."

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Kelly6
Gold Coast, QLD
6th March 2011 5:07pm
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jim says...
does anybody know why this is so id love to grow some fruit :)
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jim16
 
8th March 2011 6:36pm
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amanda says...
jim - where are you located? do u mean black dried up stems on your tree?

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amanda19
Geraldton. Mid West WA
8th March 2011 8:05pm
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randey says...
hi amanda, randey here . long time no hear. i think jims "problem" is that when the plant goes into flower mode, then into fruit mode and then into self thinning and sometimes into complete failure and the result is a bunch of brown stems. my kensington did exactly the same thing for its initial growing phase of 3 years. every year since then i apply npk blue and poo coming up to flowering time and start a watering regime. my tree is about 2m tall and produces anything up to 3 doz fruit ranging in size from 75mm up to 180mm. it then starts going into blush
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randey
perth
8th March 2011 11:11pm
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amanda says...
Hi randey - where have u been all this time!? :) Yes - I was thinking more water and some food for jims tree too - mine do the same here....they have also been much happier this summer with the humidity we are getting....(even if I am not!)
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amanda19
Geraldton. Mid West WA
10th March 2011 9:56am
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jim says...
Hi Amanda Im located at Caves Beach in Lake Macquarie NSW.
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jim16
 
15th March 2011 4:50pm
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jim says...
Also Amanda what month does a mango tree start to flower in NSW, do you have any idea
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jim16
 
15th March 2011 4:54pm
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Original Post was last edited: 21st April 2011 5:31pm
randey says...
hey amanda, my apologies for the gap in communications, have been unwell( have joined the zipper club)and have been painting and carpeting the house in prep to selling and downsizing ( house only). would like to get about an acre with a smaller house and head towards a bit of self sufficiency. by the way i just picked a mango that weighed in at 700gms. having it to eat tonight with some ice cream. hmmmm. sorry about that. will try and keep in contact.
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randey
perth
15th March 2011 9:59pm
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Steven says...
Hey everyone.

I think i have a borer in my mango tree. This year it has barely grown and yesterday i noticed a hole in the trunk and if you follow it down the trunk you can see the tree slowly dying as it eats its way to the ground!

Is there any way to 'sort the borer out' without having to cut the tree back like mad??

Thanks

Steven
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Steven
Eastern Melbourne
16th March 2011 10:02pm
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peter says...
try and poke a long flexible wire down the hole and with a bit of luck you might squewer it.
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adelaide
16th March 2011 10:22pm
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Steven says...
I was thinking the same Peter ill give it a try. That'll learn him for eating my tree!! :)

There have actually been alot of borers in my area lately. ill let you know how it works out.

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Steven
Eastern Melbourne
17th March 2011 12:44am
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Olga says...
Steven, use a wire to kill the grubs, then use Confidor - inject it into the hole and then use wood putty to fix the hole.
I also used kerosene, works well but smells.
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Olga3
BNE
17th March 2011 8:22pm
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grub says...
gidday jim,they should start to flower around november.. im a little lower down the coast over here and mine started to flower in late october.
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17th March 2011 8:34pm
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Claudine says...
hi Kerri! i live in singleton, w.a (near mandurah) have a mango tree in a pot that has just had its first ever fruit after 7 yrs! i bought it from kmart in karratha,and was tiny :) it lived with me in a pot up therefor 2 yrs, and has been down here for nearly 5 yrs now. it cops alot of wind, as wer near the ocean, but seems to be doing well now... ive just got alot of fruit from it, theyve all ripened really quickly because of all the hot summer days wev had, so ripe inside, green skin still tho...my friend also has a mango tree in a pot in beachside warnbro,previously in shoalwater.. and has had fruit from it for 3 yrs now, but had it for 10yrs all up....so it is possible! just have to be patient and water and feed it often :)
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Claudine
Singleton W.A.
19th March 2011 5:36pm
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Aryan Dsena says...
Hello Everyone:) HELP ME
I have a 40Years old Mango tree{20Ft} in our backyard but from last 7years it was fruiting hardly 4-5mangoes BUT this time I thought to add fertilizers{2Kg Urea,10gm Gibberenlic Acid and 1kgDAP} and 50ml pesticide i.e {"Dimethoate"}both sprayed and into ground.I did fertilizing and pesticiding in December and in January we received Uncountable flowers I mean flowers were covering whole tree!!Then on 11th March I read this Forum to spray pesticide while flowering so I Heavily sprayed Dimethoate with water Gun over flowers But from last Two days flowers have become BARE{Dried} and 80% of them have fallen:(:( But now there is Leaf growth all over the tree Gosh the leaves are growing like bullet train!!
Help me what went wrong??What to do??
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Aryan Dsena
New Delhi
24th March 2011 5:31am
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Brendan says...
Hi Aryan,
Have a look up the page a bit, and see 'post' by me (13th Feb, 2011), that will fix your problem :-)
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
24th March 2011 10:00am
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Wayne says...
Brendan, Aryan made this same post in another thread, the spray he has been using will kill anything that moves so this also could have been the problem, the flowers not being polinated. Anthracnose will show on the leaves so he should check them
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Wayne1
Mackay QLD
24th March 2011 5:38pm
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Aryan Dsena says...
Thanks Brendan and Wayne ya I made same post twice because here there are More people to help me out:) but our temperature is pretty High and there were no visible signs of Anthracnose.
Following were signs that I suspect
1}Out of 50 flower stems least one was weird Very heavy/thick flowered that I always bear No Fruit just stays on tree as it is.
2}Flowers by the way were very healthy but after spray I lost All
3}I dont see any signs for Anthracnose because at Delhi temp is Very High and No rain ever in last 3months.
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Aryan Dsena
New Delhi
24th March 2011 9:05pm
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Aryan Dsena says...
Please help me out in Detail what is wrong?Note-Dates are wrong due to camera settings.
Some flowers are VERY THICK they are not affected by medicine {Dimethoate} nor they ever Fruit
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Aryan Dsena
New Delhi
24th March 2011 10:04pm
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Aryan Dsena says...
@Brendan and Wayne please help me out
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Aryan Dsena
New Delhi
25th March 2011 6:55pm
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Brendan says...
Hi Aryan,
That Dimethoate you're using was banned in many countries years ago, IMO, it is not a medicine, it's a poison! Don't use it.

Try using the Copper oxychloride and Mancozeb Plus spray (with wetter), it is not only for Anthracnose! It will fix a range of problems, but don't spray open flowers with it. If you MUST spray open flowers, just use the Mancozeb Plus with wetter.

Try it Aryan, you'll be surprized :-)
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
26th March 2011 9:29am
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Original Post was last edited: 30th March 2011 9:28am
Aryan Dsena says...
Here Dimethoate and Methylamine are being Sold out like crazy after your post Today I went Two local nursery surprisingly they Haven't heard about both of them ever Hard luck for me.
I will try out some distant proper pesticide shops
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Aryan Dsena
New Delhi
27th March 2011 5:31am
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Aryan Dsena says...
Just confirm they are they Fungicides?
Any other common name/Scientific name for them?
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Aryan Dsena
New Delhi
27th March 2011 5:33am
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Brendan says...
Yes Aryan, they are both fungicides. Try 'googling' them might help. That's just what they're called over here.
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
27th March 2011 10:16am
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Aryan Dsena says...
Thanks I got them today.
Could you just guide me what amount of dosage will be sufficient for a the Tree in Pics.
Could you also tell what are all best fertilizers to be used for mango and their Dosage for tree in Pics;-)
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Aryan Dsena
New Delhi
28th March 2011 7:24pm
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Aryan Dsena says...
Also from last 10years we never watered or fertilized the Tree ever.Do a 40year tree requires weekly watering and fertilizing for bumper produce?
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Aryan Dsena
New Delhi
29th March 2011 6:20am
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Brendan says...
Hi Aryan,
Go back to my 'post' on 13th Feb (above) for the dosage for fungicides.

The 'guru' here says to fertilize every 2 to 3 months. This is his brew: 2 parts blood & bone, 1 part sulphate of potash, 1 part epsom salts. One handful per sq. metre under the dripline.

Wouldn't hurt to do a pH test as well.
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
29th March 2011 8:16am
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kert says...
Hello fellow "experts' and all those who wrongly suspect they are in a position to give advice. Dimethoate is ROGOR ,a cholinesterase insecticide,not a fungicide at all. Methylamine is neither a fungicide nor an insecticide and I have trouble imagining any use in horticulture ."Please explain"
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sydney
29th March 2011 11:06am
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Jimmy says...
kert. true
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Jimmy
Perth
29th March 2011 4:25pm
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Aryan Dsena says...
Thanks Brenden for all the Immense help I received from you and to all people here making this forum itself a Knowledge book for Mango farming:-)
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Aryan Dsena
New Delhi
30th March 2011 2:59pm
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cavesjim says...
hi im in caves beach nsw south of newcastle
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7th April 2011 10:18am
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Bad Habits says...
I have what I think may be white fly on my mangos. The mangos have fruit on them and also are in the process of flowering. What should I do to get rid of the white fly?
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Bad Habits
Fort Lauderdale, FL
20th April 2011 2:51am
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Lewis says...
My mango tree flowers well and always have lots of mango fruit. The tree is 20ft tall holds its leaves year round and appears healthy. 3 years ago we had a bumper crop but each year since the fruit gets large and falls off. there are no signs of pests or any discoloration.

HELP.
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Lewis1
Miami, Florida
21st April 2011 2:34am
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jim says...
thanks grub do you have problems with frost in the winter, is there any solution to combat this, cheers jim
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jim16
 
23rd April 2011 8:40am
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jennifer says...
I moved into a home 7 yrs ago that had 2 very young mango trees. One of them has had fruit for the past 4 yrs (not much, but a few). The other has never had fruit. They are planted right beside each other and both get the same soil, water, etc. Someone told me I should graft, but am unsure. Anybody have any advice. The tree is green, healthy and growing great.
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jennifer
Hawaii
17th May 2011 5:07am
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Bob In Miami says...
Bad Habit of Ft Lauderdale: At this time of the year, I suggest you try washing the tree & fruit with sudsy water to remove the white flies. If you use any insecticide, the fruit will be contaminated. A car wash wand makes the task easier if you have one. If not, you can probably get one at Home Depot or Lowes.
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Starman535
Miami, FL
27th May 2011 11:14pm
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grub says...
gidday jim
we have a few frosts a year .last year was especially bad had a dozen frosts..i had my mangoes in a green house for a year then i plated them out they did look terible for the first year but now they can handle the frost .. i use to put the sprinklers on when they was frost
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6th June 2011 2:01pm
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Mike says...
Anthracnose gives most mango trees in the high rainfall areas a hard time especially when it continues to rain through winter and spring.The fungicides don't seem to be able to hold it off.Tea leaf bugs also wipe out all growing tips and flower buds in some spots. The above insecticides only work for a few weeks.
Wet conditions, excess nitrogen,warm winters(mins constantly over 18) and too much shade can inhibit flowering in FNQ.
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Cairns
13th June 2011 12:32pm
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Mike says...
Grub,
I have heard that the monoembronic mangoes (indian origin,colourful skin,can have slight turps taste) like keitt,kent,irwin,tommy atkins,van dyke etc do better in the cold than the polyembryonic mangoes (SE asian with sweeter flesh and less colour and grows true to type) like nam dok mai,keow sawoy and manila.I think bowens (KP) might be odd and a rogue indian polyembryonic type that grew from seed in oz.
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Cairns
18th June 2011 12:29am
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Mike says...
Alright while we're all excited about mangoes I thought I'd mention that the amazing Sam Ru Du variety is still being sold for $9-kg in the markets in Cairns.Fruiting all year round with lovely fruit a single grower has licenced it in Oz and is doing very well as he also has Nam Dok Mai and keow sawaoy.A bit hard for the KP's to compete.If someone got the '3 seasons' mango again from Thailand it would be the best one for the backyard.
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Cairns
21st June 2011 8:51pm
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blossom tree and landscape service says...
simply root prune your tree,not the tree itself but around the drip line insert a spade type shavel approximately twelve inches
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28th June 2011 8:24am
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robert says...
please remember most people whom tend to be arborist are not
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robert9
 
28th June 2011 8:28am
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Mary says...
I have a mango tree in my yard that is approx 20 years old. It has been heavily pruned in early June, and now has no leaves. I am concerned that it may be dying and am unsure how to salvage my tree.
I would like to save my tree, but am unsure what to do.
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Mary8
Sydney
10th July 2011 9:27am
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David says...
They usually shoot strongly after a prune. With the cool winter temperatures that flush would take longer so maybe no reason to worry , yet, except the leaves falling off sounds unusual. Was the tree healthy before the prune? How much was taken off? If any substantial branches have been taken off it would be an idea to paint the cut branches with a water based paint to seal them up.
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Perth
13th July 2011 12:11am
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S.Ravichandran says...
What can i do to increase size and colour of mangoes in my mangoetrees
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SRavichandran1
chennai
13th July 2011 6:32pm
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Mike says...
Ravi India and thailand are the world centres of mango breeding and knowledge and both have sacrificed colour in pursuit of flavour in their varieties just look at Neelum and Bombay types.Sun is all that will colour indian mangoes a bit but the dazzling red american mangoes taste like a thimble of methylated spirits is in the juice so be satisfied.
For size keep tree trimmed and open. Fertilise (good NPK and Mg) evenly after fruit set and water in well.Give plenty of water after that until fruit are 3 quarter size.
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Cairns
13th July 2011 7:07pm
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Mike says...
On second thought Ravi you could plant a peniwaraka (honeyjak) jackfruit under the mango tree.When well established chop the mango tree down and use it for mulch around the jackfruit.Your family will thank you for having a more useful and productive tree.
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Cairns
13th July 2011 7:30pm
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David says...
Assuming the tree is healthy, the size & colour will depend on the variety. If it is not a grafted tree then you may have a seedling of unknown variety. You could try contacting a local fruit tree nursery to find a variety you like, or if you know of a tree bearing the fruit you'd like to have then get some cuttings and graft onto your tree. It is called topworking, here are a few articles:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pBV_HXUFoZU
http://www.philstar.com/Article.aspx?articleId=163967
http://www.tribuneindia.com/2004/20040223/agro.htm
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Perth
14th July 2011 12:31am
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Sandles says...
I am renting in Sydney and there are two big mango trees in the back yard which had no fruit last summer and no flowers that i have seen. They look healthy with lots of leaves but there is a lot of paving directly around the base of the trees. Could they be short of water? What can i do to encourage the fruit to come? Thanks!!
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Sandles
Sydney
19th July 2011 3:47pm
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David says...
Sandles, It sounds a bit unusual to get no flowers. A lot of Mango varieties are biennial bearers, but I expect the chances are that they are Kensington Pride, which should flower every year, although the yield can vary greatly from year to year. They like cool temperatures in winter to initiate flowering, which should not be an issue in Sydney. Maybe just try looking after them, clear some paving from the base of the trees, mulch the cleared area, fertalize with a flowers & fruit fertalizer 3-4 times per year. The annual productivity depends on how they are treated all year, not just in the spring. They like to be watered in the summer.
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Perth
24th July 2011 1:45am
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amanda says...
It's interesting Sandles as my mangoe tree (K.Pride) is around 3-4yrs old I guess - and it has never flowered either. (I have grown them 500kms north of there b4 with no problems...)

I can only put it down to either the weather or the watering....as it gets everything else it needs. As there are plenty in town that are flowering and fruiting - then my guess is that it's not getting the water it needs - at the right time....

When the Wet season arrives up north - it corresponds with our dry season...so I am thinking that I may need to give it a heap more water in our dry-ish spring..?
Do they need a heap of water to initiate new growth and flowers?
I also heard that there was a time when u are supposed to with-hold water...but I can't remember when (hopefully that's not during our winter!?)

Any thoughts Wayne/Brendan/mangoe gurus? I'd like to test it this year - what would you guys do?
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amanda19
Geraldton. Mide West WA.
24th July 2011 11:20am
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David says...
Amanda, is your KP a seedling or grafted? Was just thinking that seedlings take a while longer than grafted to get to flowering and maybe its just not ready yet. Re withholding water to initiate flowering, I think its something done in tropical areas to help initiate flowering, but Geraldton should get cool enough in winter to get a temperature induced flowering.
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Perth
26th July 2011 12:03am
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amanda says...
Good point David - it is a seedling :) It's strange as I have two - and they couldn't be more different in health - the healthy one is the one that I have ignored (isn't even on retic and has had no water last summer!?)

It probably won't last forever - but it has none of the burnt leaf margins like the one in the main garden. I know they are ssensitive to salinity - but they must really hate salts (incl fertiliser salts) of any kind - like loquats!?

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amanda19
Geraldton. Mide West WA.
26th July 2011 9:17am
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David says...
That sounds interesting Amanda. If the burnt leaf margins is a result of toxicity it sounds like maybe your water is a bit salty, or a highish level of salt in the water combined with fertalizer. Up to 600 ppm is the recommended range. High pH can cause problems. Do you know the pH & salt levels of your water? If you've got any fresh rainwater maybe try drenching the burnt one to wash away some salts to see if that is the problem. They are probably fairly dormant at this time of year so I suppose you won't be able to tell until after the next flush. Or you can buy a meter to test the EC (electrical conductivity) of you soil. Here is an interesting link: http://www.pir.sa.gov.au/pirsa/more/factsheets/fact_sheets/salinity/testing_for_soil_and_water_salinity
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Perth
27th July 2011 1:16am
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jennifer says...
I also have a tree that has never flowered or fruited. It is about 9 yrs old and we have one beside it that is the same size colour, shape, etc, that has fruited for 5 yrs now. Not sure what the deal is with it. The fruiting tree is a Hayden. The non-fruiting tree is beautiful and healthy, just with no flowers or fruit.
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jennifer
Hawaii
27th July 2011 2:50am
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amanda says...
It's our scheme water David :( Had it tested and it's very poor for fruit trees (and we are coastal too) Have had bumper rain (for us) this season and the trees around the mangoe have grown heaps too - so it should help with the wind factor as well - will be interesting to see how it goes this season.

Do mangoe trees respond to cincturing do u think? Is 9yrs seems a long time with no flowers..?
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amanda19
Geraldton. Mide West WA.
27th July 2011 9:12am
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David says...
Jennifer, it sounds like you don't know what variety the non fruiting mango tree is. If it is a seedling that could explain it. The original Haden was planted in 1898 and it wasn't until the bumper season of 1910 that it was realised how productive and good it was. Not sure if this was the first fruiting season or just the first full crop, but it does give an idea of the time it may take for a seedling to show its potential.
Maybe it is a variety that is a shy flowering one in your climate.
I'm not sure if girdling or cincturing on its own will initiate flowering, but it is used by growers to promote earlier flowering. A foliar spray of 2 - 4 % potassium nitrate is a method used to stimulate flowering. In tropical areas with holding water in winter can promote flowering.
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Perth
28th July 2011 1:16am
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Nick says...
I just stumbled upon this website: http://www.canarius.com/blog/tag/mangifera, and it seems like pretty valuable info, any comments?
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Nick T
Altona, VIC
12th August 2011 8:27pm
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Nick says...
I also saw a comment on: http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/tropicalfruits/msg0118105824868.html that said something about salt ocean air working as an anti-fungal??
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Nick T
Altona, VIC
12th August 2011 8:41pm
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amanda says...
That's total B.S. Nick... :)
And - mangoes hate salinity!
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amanda19
Geraldton. Mide West WA.
13th August 2011 1:40am
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Jantina says...
Salt air as an antifungal aside, that's a tantalising cool mango thread for us heat challenged southerners Nick. Especially that Florigon was mentioned, mine is still doing fine but alas still in a pot. The great wall of China has been slow going over winter (just the ends to finish now) so next year will be the real test.
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Jantina
Mt Gambier
13th August 2011 10:29am
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amanda says...
Are u building a wall for a microclimate Jantina? It will be really interesting to see your 'road test' results! :)

(ps Nick - wasn't being rude up there...just cheeky...was thinking how our lovely salty gales here...I still get the usual mildews etc...maybe it's the extra humidity though..)
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amanda19
Geraldton. Mide West WA.
13th August 2011 12:27pm
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jennifer says...
Thank you so much for your input. I will try the spray and see what happens. Trying to limit water in winter here in Hawaii is almost impossible as that is our rainy season. Our other mango now is having a worm problem. The mangos look gorgeous and then when you cut them open they have white worms resembling large maggots in them...I'm not sure how to fix that problem now that the fruit is already there. I grew up in Canada, so the mango tree growing is a very foreign concept to me.
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jennifer
Hawaii
13th August 2011 4:27pm
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Drady-1990 says...
does potassium nitrate really force mangoes to bear fruit?
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dradyz
Bathurst
13th August 2011 9:14pm
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Nick says...
Haha I thought it sounded like crap but I thought I'd check first. Great to hear that your Great Wall (XD) is going good Jantina! :)
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Nick T
Altona, VIC
13th August 2011 9:54pm
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David says...
Jennifer, the white maggots sound like fruit fly. There are different species around the world, so try contacting your local agriculture department for the recommended controls for the species in your area. Where I am we get the Mediterranean variety, http://agspsrv34.agric.wa.gov.au/ento/medfly.htm.

Jantina, Mt.Gambier sounds ambitious for mango. Are there any there already that you know of? Please let us know of how it goes.
I think the idea of the indochinese varieties maybe being able to set fruit in wet conditions may not stretch to wet and cold conditions. The indo chinese ones tend to be the more tropical types that you'd expect to need less stimulus to flower than the Indian ones which have a background of more seasonal variation throughout the year. The Florigon does sound interesting though as it is supposed to be a cross between a florida variety and a indochinese (Saigon I think), so I suppose it could have some characteristics of both. Are you trying any other varieties?

Drady, I haven't tried potassium nitrate, but it is supposed to be a stimulus, like the weather (a cold spell) or water stress, or girdling. I think if you are already getting some sort of strong flowering stimulus like cool temperature, then I'd imagine that another flowering stimulus might not be the solution, but no harm in trying, although maybe a good year round fertaliser & water program may be all thats needed.
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Perth
18th August 2011 1:42am
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jennifer says...
Thanks David!
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jennifer
Hawaii
25th August 2011 9:02am
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viv says...
thai or banana mangoes
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viv1
Ingham
28th August 2011 3:24pm
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Original Post was last edited: 28th August 2011 3:29pm
Mike says...
Mangoes thrive around here on the beaches just above HAT and adjacent to intertidal creeks where there must come into contact with saline water.I go next to saltwater creek to get the feral bowens each year.They must have a fair degree of tolerance to salt. I know chloride fertlisers cause burnt edges of leaves however.Both dry and cool(many evenings below 7 celcius) winters stimulate flowering in spring and only after flowering should they receive lot of water.
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Cairns
28th August 2011 6:02pm
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amanda says...
Really Mike? I used to fish for grunter in Saltwater creek not so long ago and there were plenty of snakes but no mangoes...the bats must be happy :)

Mangoes are very sensitive to salt - so maybe they have their feet in some of the numerous springs that run under the ground and out to sea...?

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amanda19
Geraldton. Mide West WA.
28th August 2011 7:45pm
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Mike says...
In the last 35 years or so I have caught lots of barra,jacks,flathead,prawns,crabs and even tilapia there but only small grunter.The trees are pretty close to the edge in a few spots and must get a bit of salt.Today on the way to Port Douglas I noticed stringies that must be influenced by salt but were thriving.The bats go crazy on the fruit and drop manoes on roofs quite often.
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Cairns
28th August 2011 11:05pm
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amanda says...
yes - just don't get bat poo on the paintwark of your car during mangoe season, and forget to wash it off... :-(

Dunno - maybe the huge amount of flushing rains help over that way...

Here is a handy table anyway (I have searched many in the past - and the lists are pretty much the same:

http://www.sarasotafruitandnutsociety.org/information/selectingtreesforsalttolerance.htm

(edit: can't say I agree with passionfruit - I have never had any 'noticable' problem with them here - but have with many of the others on the sensitive list)
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amanda19
Geraldton. Mide West WA.
29th August 2011 9:14am
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Original Post was last edited: 29th August 2011 9:17am
Isa says...
I planted a mango tree about 4 years ago on the north wall of the house. It was growing very well and produced masses of flowers last year and this year with no fruit appearing. This year the leaves have now turned very limp and yellow on the top half of the tree. Please help before I feel it is going to die altogether.
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Isa
Melbourne
30th August 2011 10:26am
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David says...
Isa, what sort of soil do you have, sandy and well drained, or heavy clay, maybe waterlogged. Have you checked the soil pH? Do you fertalize at all? Some photos would help.
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Perth
3rd September 2011 12:11am
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jo jo says...
yeah right thats not working
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big dog
 
11th September 2011 4:37pm
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Carmen says...
I too would love to know how to get our mango's to fruit.
We bought a property in Sheldon last year. The orchard is 20-30 years old and was in a bit of a state of disrepair but nothing that pruning, fertilizing and a bit of water when it gets dry hasn't fixed. We have also had to use white oil and soapy water spray to get rid of the black fungus on the leaves of all of the fruit trees but this year everything is looking great.
We have lots of varieties of mango's and they all flowered prolifically last year and this year. No fruit set at all last year and everyone said that the rain during flowering spoilt them everywhere and we would have to wait till next year. This year a magnificent showing of flowers and to our disappointment no fruit has set again.
If anyone can tell us why there is no fruit and what to do to get fruit that would be great. (We lived in Papua New Guinea for 6 years and the mango's had fruit on them nearly all year without any TLC or special care so I thought they were easy....not so here in Brisbane)
Photo of "no fruit" mango tree attached
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Carmen
Sheldon
21st September 2011 5:57pm
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Brendan says...
Can't find photo Carmen?
Sounds like yor mango tree has Anthracnose. It stops fruit forming etc.
BTW, last year was very bad for mangoes all round. (Too many cyclones?)
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
24th September 2011 7:14am
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jojh says...
Rain at flowering ,temperatures below 10 deg C all result in no fruit. Massive mango trees in Innisfail have no fruit because of spring rain.
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cost
26th September 2011 6:37am
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Mike says...
From Townsville north along the coast winter rain and the howling trade winds during flowering are the main problems but a couple of bugs and a stem moth can also prevent fruiting.Anthracnose also can stop fruit setting but trimming can open up the canopy and lessen the impact of this fungal disease.The year after heavy pruning trees often skip fruiting especially if their fertliser had more nitrogen than other macronutrients.
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Cairns
26th September 2011 5:42pm
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Adam Mcclain says...
Hi there, When I moved in about 2 years ago the old owner had neglected this old mango tree. He told me it has had lots of fruit over the years. Poor old tree only had a handful of leaves on it.

Late winter 2010 I pruned it back a little. Didn't want to cut to much off.

Now pretty much a year later its has recovered quite well. I have been using See-Feed as a foliage fertiliser and some potash watered into the ground.

And I just started using mancozeb for the black spots/ fungus.

I have a few questions

Should I mulch out to the drip line?

Can I prune while it is flowering?

what type of mango is it?

From the pics you can see there are some problems with the tree.

Any advice on what to do and how to help the tree will be much appreciated.

Cheers

Adam






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Adam Mcclain
Glenbrook Lower Blue Mountains NSW
22nd October 2011 12:00pm
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Original Post was last edited: 23rd October 2011 12:59pm
Brendan says...
G'day Adam,
Some answers to your questions.
1) Yes, if possible, mulch (and fertilize) out to the dripline. Your mulch is too close to the trunk in pic 1.
2) Best not to prune when flowering. Best time is after it has finished fruiting.
3) Hard to tell, have you had any fruit?
To harden up the tissue of the tree, give it Sulphate of Potash. You may have to spray for Anthracnose. See other 'mango' threads on this forum.
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
23rd October 2011 8:37am
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Adam says...
Thanks brendan,

I'll give it a go.

No fruit yet apparently hasn't been any for a few years. I vaguely remember the old owner saying they are large and red..? Fingers crossed I'll get some this year!
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24th October 2011 2:26pm
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David says...
Adam, Its a bit hard having a guess at the variety without the fruit. If I was to have a punt, given the suggestion that the fruit may be redder than a KP I'd have a go at Irwin. On my Irwin the panicle stems are quite a bright pink/red like your pic #4, and the leaves seem a bit lighter green than KP. I haven't seen a lot of mature Irwin and mine is young.
For the infection the tree has I think spray with a mixture of Mangozeb and Copper oxychlorate. Hopefully it is fungal, not bacterial. The copper will help stop a bacterial infection from spreading but won't kill it off. It would be good to see a close up of some of the more infected leaves to see how the infection spreads to give a better idea of what it may be.
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David1
Perth
26th October 2011 12:58am
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Jess says...
Hi. I have a great young mango tree that uaually bears heaps of fruit. This year it has fruited, but all the small fruit are dropping off the tree. There have been no winds. Do you know why this is happening?
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Jess7
Gold Coast
13th November 2011 8:46am
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Jacinto says...
That really make sense. I've been disappointed with 3 early springs of flowering mango and not being able to develop fruit because of abnormally cold and wet springs. I'm getting old and my time is running out. So next spring I will chop all early flowers to the base and hope for the late flowers to come again in summer.
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Jacinto
Central Coast Syney
29th November 2011 5:10pm
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mani says...
7 yrs old tree no flowers too......
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mani1
india
1st December 2011 7:24am
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David says...
What varieity of mango is your tree Mani?
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David1
Perth
2nd December 2011 2:11am
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Ravina says...
Hi,

My Mango tree is 6/7 year old but not giving us fruits , please suggest some medicine for this.
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Ravina
India( New Delhi)
3rd January 2012 9:29pm
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Brendan says...
Hi mani & Ravina,
Have a look at this video:
http://www.abc.net.au/local/videos/2011/05/05/3208266.htm?site=capricornia
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
4th January 2012 9:07am
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Ravina says...
Thanks. Our tree is not look like this (picture shown in the video). Next week I will upload the picture of the tree so that we can find a better solution.

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Ravina
India( New Delhi)
6th January 2012 10:05pm
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Sarfaraz says...
Hi there, I'm a mango merchant just starting of my career in this field, there are too many flowers on the trees, just wanted to knw which is the best sprays I can apply to the trees to prevent from fungus
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Sarfaraz
India
11th January 2012 5:00pm
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Radi says...
We planted a grafted Kensington Pride Mango tree about 4 years ago. The second year we got 4 mangoes, last year 25 large beautiful tasting fruit. This year looked terrific until the flowers went black and dropped off - and no fruit at all. I know it was supposed to be low fruiting year because of weather, wind etc. I do not know why we got no fruit at all. Any ideas please on what I should do? Am I watering too much? The tree is very healthy.
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Radi
Townsville NQ
14th January 2012 9:59pm
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Brendan says...
Radi,that's Anthracnose. Check out this video:
http://www.abc.net.au/local/videos/2011/05/05/3208266.htm
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
15th January 2012 7:52am
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rupesh says...
Hi,
i am not getting much flowers on my mango tree this year
i want more and more flowers on my tree
please hlep me in doing that.pls suggest any fertilizers or some biproduct ..urgent
thanks
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rupesh
mumbai
18th January 2012 7:29pm
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buddyben says...
our mango trees started budding in december and everything looked so promising. however it is late january now and all the buds on most of the trees are blackening and drying up. can you please tell us what we are doing wrong to let this happen. your help would be greatly appreciated
ben
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buddyben
thailand
26th January 2012 1:41pm
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Brendan says...
Hi buddyben, go back a few posts, and click on the link posted by me. Sounds like Anthracnose.
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
27th January 2012 8:03am
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LyndaK says...
No fruit - no flying foxes - no hendra virus...

I am actually interested in methods of stopping mangoes and guavas from flowering as I have horses and don't want Hendra virus. I don't want to have to cut down all of the trees so stopping them from fruiting would be a good option.
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LyndaK
Ingham Q
30th January 2012 12:31pm
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Original Post was last edited: 30th January 2012 12:34pm
Mike says...
I remember the immense flights of spectacled flying foxes in the wet tropics lowlands when I was a kid.There are are no where near as many now as there used to be,With the sugar expansion only about 20% of the lowlands remain with most ofthe bats favoured feeding grounds being cleared.As keystone seed dispersers and pollinators in the rainforest I don't support heavy culls.They are long lived animals and it tempers my annoyance at losing fruit to realise they could have been pushed by losing natural foods.I don't know if anyone has got hendra from a bat before but they sure pick it up from horses after the virus 'expodes' in equines.Getting rid of the horses in hendra country would be the easiest solution.
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Cairns
30th January 2012 6:02pm
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LyndaK says...
Hendra country covers an awful lot of Australia. Anywhere that flying foxes frequent. You really think we should slaughter every horse in 70% of the continent? No happening, Mike. I guess it will be the trees that pay the price since we can't get rid of the foxes and the horses are not going anywhere (unless they get Hendra of course!)
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LyndaK
Ingham Q
30th January 2012 9:34pm
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Mike says...
No Linda I would never suggest killing the horses it was a statement to say there are no easy or happy solutions.The horses will stay and so will the bats and management such as not having fruit trees with fruit or having inoculations needs to be considered.I think hendra outbreak areas are more localised than you suggest.There are many wildlife and livestock diseases that cross over only sometimes in certain conditions.
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Cairns
30th January 2012 10:08pm
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Peter says...
Is the first vaccine trial on the way?
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Peter36
Perth
30th January 2012 10:18pm
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LyndaK says...
Yes the vaccine is coming... may be six months or more yet. And yes outbreaks only occur here and there like at Majors Creek but the outcome is terminal for horses and not great for people. So stopping trees from fruiting till the vaccine arrives would be ideal.
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LyndaK
Ingham
1st February 2012 8:49am
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vbsakpal says...
whether water should be given to plant after flowering in what frequency
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karjat raigad
24th February 2012 7:13pm
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vbsakpal says...
whether water should be given to plant after flowering in what frequency
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karjat raigad
24th February 2012 7:16pm
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vbsakpal says...
whether water should be given to plant after flowering in what frequency
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karjat raigad maharashtra
24th February 2012 8:08pm
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george says...
yes.there is a chance.dig and make a circle around the tree trunk bout 2 to 3 feet or about 1mter away.depth shuld be around 1foot.put compost.water when dry. when it rains dont water anymore.contak me in about 10months or so.goodluck.
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george10
philippines
11th March 2012 12:34am
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Himanshu says...
Hello friends , I am from Bihar , India . My backyard mango flowers are also turning black and i can see flies around the upcoming fruits..

What should i do ? What do i sprinkle on these flowers..and at what interval..and quantity
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Himanshu
Bihar
18th March 2012 9:37pm
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Original Post was last edited: 18th March 2012 10:40pm
Brendan says...
Hi Himanshu, looks like your tree has anthracnose. But the 'cure' for that cannot be sprayed on open flowers!
If it were mine, I'd spray it now with 30g mancozeb plus in 4½ litres of water with a 'good' wetting agent. The key is the wetting agent, you might have to add more. If you use copper oxychloride (as in the video) on open flowers, it will kill them.
I'd be giving it some sulphate of potash as well. The soil it's grwoing in doesn't look very fertile? No mulch?

Check out the video below.

http://www.abc.net.au/local/videos/2011/05/05/3208266.htm
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
20th March 2012 9:23am
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Himanshu says...
Thanks you Brendan for this precious piece of info.Yes..rightly pointed..the soil is not very fertile and bit harder..
The tree was planted by dad and the tree is surrounded by a concrete semi-circle..
What do you suggest on this issue?
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Himanshu
Bihar
23rd March 2012 2:59am
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subhash says...
have a mango tree in my yard about 12 years old. It not flowers, no fruits.
what do i
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subhash
north delhi india
20th April 2012 1:06am
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Brendan says...
Hi subhash, go back a few steps and check out the older posts, they should point you in the right direction.

LindaK, to stop mangoes & guavas fruiting, spray the OPEN flowers with a stiff brew of copper oxychloride with a good wetting agent added. Spray twice weekly till all the flowers drop off.
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
21st April 2012 7:02am
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Marissa says...
I have four mango trees that flower but the fruit does not stick to them. Can you tell what I need to do or feed the mango tree in order for the fruit to stick and so that I can have mangos? Thank you
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Marissa
 
5th July 2012 12:25am
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Maryshells says...
My neighbor has a huge mango tree in his back yard. They had been in the house for 15 years and never had one mango on it. Last year he has massive amounts of mangos on it and this year as well. When I asked him what he did to encourage the tree to fruit he said he had a gardener come and look at it. He was told there was nothing wrong with the tree and he recommended my neighbor shock it by beating it. Well, he did, little 85 year old man went out with his broom and beat the mango tree. For some strange reason the tree started producing mangos, so many that he goes to Walmart and Publix parking lots and gives them out to people for free.

Anyone else heard of this?
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Maryshells
Englewood
13th July 2012 6:51am
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BJ says...
Haha, the broomstick? Thats a lot of work. I prefer the axe handle - more bang for your buck. The threat of having the axe out seems to scare a few plants into producing. Some plants flower best when they think they are going to die, and need to pass on their genes in the form of seeds in fruit. perhaps this explains why this works on a few fruit trees. Poinciana trees also give the same reaction.
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The poster formerly known as...
Brisbane
13th July 2012 8:10am
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Justin says...
We have had a mango tree ever since we moved here in 13 years a go and it hasn`t produced one fruit on it... Can you suggest a reason for this?
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Justin3
Brisbane
29th December 2012 1:14pm
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bapu4 says...
Dear Bern,
I am afraid if you beleive in homeopathy but it does have wonderful effects on plant please try this take Pfosphorus 30 in liquid take 2 lits of potable water in a plastic bottle and add 4 drops of liquid Phosphorus and shake it 30-40 times rigorously give this water to plant and see the magicin coming flowering season.
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bapu4
India
7th January 2013 10:21pm
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bondibabe says...
Hi, I came across this forum while looking for a site to show me how to prune my very large mango tree. Just read most of your posts and want to add my 2 cents worth.
My tree is 22 years old. Given to my son when he was a toddler and planted with the help of his grandpa.
Its a Bowen mango.
We have subtropical climate Far north Coast NSW, Australia.
Some years we get lots of rain others little. Over the years I have observed that with not much more than a occasional prune my tree seems to know best. The best fruiting happens when we have a reasonably dry winter followed by good rainfall during spring Tree gets stressed with little water and produces lots of flowers and fruit which then lap up the rain in spring.
It does seem to need pruning to get the light into the middle of the tree to reach and produce flowers. Also likes lots of sun in winter and does not produce fruit on any sides that are in shade for a too long during daylight hours.
I have never fed tree with anything or sprayed as its too big but we have rich red volcanic soil that pretty much grows anything. Tree mulches itself when the leaves drop. We get a few fruit bats when the fruit is out which love to have a bite of each so best to pick as much fruit as soon as colours. Delicious flavour. Don't prune more that one third once its over at least 12ft would be my advice and you should not expect fruit every year. don't water once tree is over 4 or 5 years old unless you have had absolutely no rain for at least 6 months in winter. Hope this helps someone

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bondibabe
Kingscliff
18th May 2013 2:04pm
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Ginny says...
Hi Autumn, The Mango that you discribe is a Strawberry mango, i have one and when it turns with colour on the top you can pick it and let it soften in your fruit bowl which will take a couple of days.
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Ginny
Australia
3rd July 2013 12:14am
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Anonymous says...
Just wondering if anyone in SEQ or Northern Rivers NSW has mangos in flower now?
I have a small, or young Five foot banana mango in full bloom, Has been for some weeks.
The old kerosine mangos and a few other new plantings are normal winter dormant
A real early cropper?
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MNash1
 
6th July 2013 6:26pm
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David_WM says...
Banana is supposed to be a very early variety, but I am not from your area so I don't know if its normal.
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DavidWM1
Perth
7th July 2013 12:41am
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Brain says...
update, a few of my mangos are sending out flower spikes. I suspect it will start flowering in another week. Very strange in the middle of winter here in Brisbane.
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Brain
Brisbane
22nd July 2013 10:00am
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John Mc says...
I can't believe I have a Florigon throwing flower spikes as well, and I'm 900km's south of you.
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JohnMc1
 
22nd July 2013 10:42am
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BJ says...
I've got a few spikes coming on. In Mackay last week the mangoes were in full bloom. Some of my stonefruits have already set fruit and are leafing out...
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The poster formerly known as...
Brisbane
22nd July 2013 11:18am
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Brain says...
maybe the plants knows something we don't.

I'm not confident of any of the mango setting in this rain. I need a drier winter.
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Brain
Brisbane
22nd July 2013 2:41pm
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DY says...
Hi Folks, I'm in Sydney and have a mango tree which has always flowered and begun fruiting (as pictured), but the fruit will not grow much larger than this and will drop off.

Sprayed with Mancozeb once only months ago. Today I fertilized with a slow release fruit and citrus fertilizer which I picked up from the nursery.

Does the tree look healthy or does it need further spraying ? The trunk looks like it has some white spots on it. Any suggestions to ensure the fruits don't drop off again this summer ?
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Picture: 1

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Picture: 3
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DY
Killara
26th November 2013 2:11am
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yrt says...
Cold nights below 10degC will sterilize ripening mango fruits and such fruit will drop when still quite small.
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yrt
sydney
26th November 2013 4:39pm
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DY says...
Yes, but it doesn't get below 10 degrees C in Sydney in spring, so I don't think that's the problem. Many people in Sydney have success with mango trees.
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DY
Killara
27th November 2013 9:43am
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yrt says...
OK, rain at the time of flowering will do the same thing by washing away pollen.
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yrt
sydney
27th November 2013 9:57am
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David1 says...
It looks a little yellowish and some of the leaves are a bit wrinkled in picture 1. Yellowish is a sign of nitrogen or iron deficiency. Wrinkled leaves tend to mean a zinc deficiency. It might be a little late to salvage these baby mongoose as the tree saves up all year to get the reserves to produce the fruit. The quickest way of getting nutrition into it is to use foliar spray. Maybe try spraying with Thrive flowers and fruit liquid fertiliser as a start. Increase your fertiliser regime and be sure to apply regularly, trying to correct it in one dose is not good. Keep it regular. The main demand for nutrition is the growing season. Apply zinc to the roots. A spray of calcium at fruit set is also helpful as calcium is important to the new fruit and mangoes struggle to take up calcium which is why foliar spray at fruit set is good. David
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David1
Morcombe,6006,WA
28th November 2013 1:09am
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ylr says...
Maryshells, your story is funny, the mango had a fruit after the owner beats it with a broom stick hahaha.. but isn't not right ? I wonder what's the explanation?
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ylr
vic
16th January 2014 5:27pm
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Michael D says...
Im in south west Sydney and for some strange reason my mango tree is putting out lots of new leaf growth and flower buds.Normally this will occur in Aug/Sep but why now in May just before Winter?Should I ignore it or cut the new growth and flower buds off ?
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Michael D
wakeley
29th May 2014 7:40pm
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MaryT says...
Michael it is the high temperatures that we've been having in Sydney. My fruit trees are doing same. I have not thought about removing the flowers and fruit so good question. Anyone with experience?
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MaryT
Sydney
29th May 2014 7:50pm
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Michael D says...
My thought was if I leave the flower buds and it turns into mangoes would it even survive winter and secondly would the tree then stop flowering at Spring time meaning I would loose my usual cycle and would have to wait another year for the next cycle.Any thoughts?
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Michael D
wakeley
29th May 2014 8:09pm
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Markmelb says...
My newly planted Palmer is budding flowers i think a bit early with new growth also due to our warm May (was a new record 21 days just over 20c) - if you remove they will regrow later - a trick employed as pollination wont occur I read under 15c? try leaving a couple flowers and spray with Yates Liquid copper for fungal from rains - post later how you go with a new forum heading as this is getting too big like ``Mango flowering early`` Tasted one of my 2 small KP mangoes last nite - Tasty
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Markmelb
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30th May 2014 8:35am
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