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Flying dragon compatability

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Learner1 starts with ...
What citrus can be grafted successfully to Flying Dragon rootstock
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Learner1
ARNO BAY,5603,SA
4th December 2018 11:43pm
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jakfruit etiquette says...
Flying Dragon is a type of Poncirus trifoliata, so the grafting compatability is the same, if not slightly wider. It is probably better to check if something is incompatable with FD or TRI. It has been reported that FD doesnt show exactly the same incompatability as TRI.
Another thing to consider is that FD is dwarfing, and very vigorous varieties might overgrow the FD rootstock, which will appear stunted.
Quote Scion compatibility
Severe ‘benching’ at the bud union can develop at an early age though it is not always associated with tree decline. Good compatibility has been reported with oranges and grapefruit but performance of mandarins and lemons is less assured (it is likely to be incompatible with Eureka lemon).

That leaves all the other Citrus types, ie Limes, Kumquat, Calamondin, etc etc
as compatable.
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jakfruit etiquette
vic
6th December 2018 9:43pm
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jakfruit etiquette says...
Another thing to consider about Citrus incompatability are such cases where buds or grafts simply will not take vs cases of delayed incompatability, where a problem develops later on, ie graft death, weakness or fault at the graft surface/joint etc etc.
There are ways to get around this, such as interstocks of a compatable type to both rootstock and graft.
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jakfruit etiquette
vic
7th December 2018 10:22pm
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Manfred says...
I think flying dragon is a US name for Poncirus trifoliata, which we normally just call "e;trifoliata"e; when we are talking/writing about citrus rootstocks. It is a citrale, not a citrus, generally compatible with citrus species, (but not eureka) used for its semi-dwarfing, collar-rot resistance, slight salt tolerance, frost tolerance and drought resistance. It is a monotypic genus (there is only one species in the genus).

They used to call it "e;bitter orange"e; in the US but went to flying dragon so they could sell more.

It isn't my favourite rootstock because it has been reported to impart bitterness to some fruit. I also don't need dwarfing because I generally have the room for full size trees.

Play with it but don't rely on it.
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Manfred
Wamboin
8th December 2018 9:46pm
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Learner1 says...
What are examples of interstock type for flying dragon and a compatible fruit? What are the reasons for the use of an interstock? Thanks for help it is very interesting.
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Learner1
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9th December 2018 7:01am
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jakfruit etiquette says...
The major difference with flying dragon and other types of Poncirus trifoliata, is that FD has very zig zag stems and down curved thorns. Tri is a winter dormant deciduous Citrus relative, and FD has an even longer period of dormancy than TRI. This is one factor in its dwarfing character, as it doesnt grow as fast as other TRI or Citrus under winter dormancy conditions. The zig zag stems dont make budding or grafting as easy as with other Citrus.
In Poncirus trifoliata, there are many named varieties, and a couple of main types ( large flowered and small flowered types ).
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jakfruit etiquette
vic
10th December 2018 8:39pm
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Original Post was last edited: 11th December 2018 8:36pm

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