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Where can I get a devil's fig cutting?

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Old Herbaceous starts with ...
Can anybody help point me in the right direction to obtain either an established cutting or a plant of the Devil's Fig variety. I would like to try grafting an egg plant onto the Devil's Fig using it as root stock. Any advice would be great please.
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Old Herbaceous
Bangalee NSW
20th January 2018 2:29pm
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Markmelb says...
Its not a Fig but is a Solanum
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Markmelb
MOUNT WAVERLEY,3149,VIC
22nd January 2018 11:14pm
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phil@tyalgum says...
Try a site called deepgreenpermaculture.com
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phil@tyalgum
Murwillumbah
23rd January 2018 1:22pm
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Fruitylicious1 says...
Hi Old Herb

Devil's Fig (Solanum Torvum) aka wild eggplant is considered a weed in northern and eastern Queensland, northern part of N.T. and some coastal parts of northern N.S.W. So you can scour those areas. Some of them are growing on side roads. If you know what you are looking for those are the areas that they are frequently found.

There is also another Devil's Fig (solanum chrysotrichum) which is considered a weed in Queensland, N.S.W. some parts of Vic and N.T. They are a serious weed because they are poisonous to both humans and animals. Again if you know what you are looking for they can be found anywhere in those States and Territory even on side roads if you are lucky.

I have uploaded an image of the Devil's fig (solanum torvum) pic 1, and (solanum chrysotrichum) pic 2 for your reference.

Happy Gardening :-}
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1

Picture: 2
 
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Fruitylicious1
TAMWORTH,2340,NSW
24th January 2018 8:14pm
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Original Post was last edited: 25th January 2018 10:04am
coolbreeze says...
Hi All,

Just wanted to say that I think both pics that have been uploaded are most likely of the same plant. That been the Devil's Fig (s.torvam). First pic is of s.torvam in it's seedling/juvenile stage and second pic is s.torvam in it's adult/later stage.

The Giant devil's fig (s.chrysotrichum) has more than 7 lobes on it's adult leaves and is a lot larger in size.

I am also currently trying to graft eggplants onto stronger root stocks in hope of making an eggplant tree as such. Had luck in finding a wild pea eggplant (s.torvam) seedling right before new years which I dug up and planted into a pot at home. After roughly about a week of wilting, transplant shock and loosing three of it's seven leaves, it sprang back into life. I kept babying it for another 2 weeks or so before I took the plunge and tried my first ever graft. I used black supreme eggplant as my scion which I bought from Bunnings (as 4 seedlings tray) the same day I found the wild pea eggplant. I used a cleft graft and scion was thinner than root stock. I lined the cambium up on one side only and taped it up using white plumbing tape.
I'm happy to say the graft has taken and the top and side buds have grown into small leaves. The graft joint has healed nicely also. Hopefully it is all smooth sailing from here on out.

I have now planted seeds of another three eggplants. (Kermit F1, black beauty and an Italian heirloom) Am still waiting for them to sprout then grow a little so I can do more grafting. I have another S.torvam seedling which I got on the same day as the first one ready and waiting. And an older one which I only got last Wednesday. Because it was an older plant it lost most of its leaves but is slowly coming out of transplant shock. I had to chop off it's tap root while digging it up. They're really hard to dig up because of the sharp spikes and I wouldn't do it again. I only did it because I wanted an older plant with more than one graft point and if it fully recovers, it will have three places ready to graft onto.
I had trouble for many months looking for the Devil's Fig but found a big stash of seedlings before new years near a flood water catchment near my area. However, going back there after my first graft took, Council had mowed over the lot of them except for that older one I mentioned. Which I took anyway after getting scratched and bloodied up. But if it fully recovers - because it's not out of the woods just yet. But if it does - it'll all be worth it.
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coolbreeze
Riverhills
25th January 2018 3:57pm
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Original Post was last edited: 25th January 2018 3:59pm
JohnMc1 says...
It's growing wild here, Old Herb. Happy to send you some seeds.
johnatcentralcoastskylightsdotcomdotau
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John Mc
WALLARAH,2259,NSW
26th January 2018 7:49am
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Old Herbaceous says...
Thankyou all for your sage advice and input. I have learned a lot from what you have all offered and I look forward to following coolbreeze as the experiment progresses. For JohnMc1: thankyou for the kind offer of seeds. I will send you an email separately to accept your kind offer. Happy gardening all.
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Old Herbaceous
Bangalee NSW
26th January 2018 10:15am
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Fruitylicious1 says...
Hi Coolbreeze

It's not fair to say that i have uploaded similar pictures based on the identification tool of a reputable government website which is Brisbane City Council weed identification tool. Again i will describe in detail the differences between the two based on a legitimate Australian government website for your scrutiny:

The differences between a solanum torvum and solanum chrysotrichum:

1. Solanum Chrysotrichum - has moderately large to very large leaves (usually 9-35 cm long) with several to numerous (7-13) moderately deep to very deep lobes. Lobe means wavy. It's relatively large white flowers (30-40mm across) have relatively large sepals (7-10mm long). The dense star shaped (i.e. stellate) hairs on its new growth are reddish in color.

2. Solanum Torvum - has moderately large leaves (usually 5-21cm long) with several slight to moderately deep lobes. Its relatively small white flowers (up to 25mm across) have small sepals (3-4mm long). The dense star shaped (i.e.) stellate) hairs on its new growth are whitish or yellowish in color.

In summary the S.Torvum has smaller and shallower waves on its leaves compared to S. Chrysotrichum. Its got smaller flowers too.

Note: If you want a more in-depth comparative analysis between this two solanum species you can visit http://delta-intkey.com/solanum/index.htm
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Fruitylicious1
TAMWORTH,2340,NSW
26th January 2018 11:20am
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Original Post was last edited: 26th January 2018 12:13pm
coolbreeze says...
Hi Fruitylisious,

I wasn't using any websites to base what I said about both pics been of S.torvam. It's just what I can tell from looking at the pics. We have many, many Giant Devil Figs trees around here and you can always tell it's them even from a far distance because of their much bigger, dangly leaves with more lobes. They also appear more brownish than S.torvam because of their brown little hairs covering the leaves. Also, unlike the second pic - their leaves hang a lot more downwards (very droopy looking) once again because of their much bigger leaf structure.
Thanks for the website references but I can tell the difference between the two pretty well. I do currently have 6 s.torvams in my backyard. One successfully grafted, a seedling, an older one and 3 rooted cuttings all waiting for suitable eggplants to grow big enough to use as scions.
Sorry if I am wrong but sometimes pics are labeled wrongly on the internet. Did you personally take them pictures or did you just get them off the web believing they were 100% correct? It's not a big deal though =).

Old Herbaceous - sorry I can't offer you any s.torvams as they are all I have at the moment. However I can offer you seeds of the Giant Devil's Fig (s.chrysotrichum) as I still have dry seeds available from when I was still sourcing s.torvam. I also have seeds of the Devil's Apple/Apple of Sodom (the very, very over prickly plant). I've heard both will work as rootstocks as well. Let me know if you are interested in either and I'm happy to help. I'll also post pics of my graft and s.torvams to keep you motivated =).
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coolbreeze
Riverhills
27th January 2018 3:32pm
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Original Post was last edited: 27th January 2018 3:59pm
coolbreeze says...
Hi again all,

pic1 - This is a pic of graft I did using a black supreme eggplant onto a solanum torvam rootstock. graft is roughly 3 weeks old. I wish I would have documented the entire grafting. I pretty much followed Vasili's youtube tutorial step for step and so far so good.
pic2 - A seedling of solanum torvam and 2 cuttings of the same which has already rooted. I checked the rooting while I was transplanting them into new pots, couldn't help myself hehe. Used Seasol planting gel for the cuttings and painted the tips with Balchun steri-prune black paint. Both purchased from Bunnings. Seedling and cuttings taken from flood water catchment just before new years day 2017.
pic3 - My older, bigger solanum torvam. This plant has just recently come out of transplant shock. As you can see it has lost ALL of its main leaves. Tips and thin branches have just perked back upwards after drooping for almost an entire week. This was taken from the same area last Wednesday 17.01.18. This will be my eggplant tree with different varieties as it has lots of grafting points.

As you can see, I have lots to play with once my eggplants grow big enough to start grafting onto these ready and waiting rootstocks. So far I have sprouted the black beauty, an Italian heirloom and the little fingers variety. Still waiting on a Kermit F1 thai variety to sprout which has taken longer than what it says on the packet so I may try again as this is the one I want to have the most of.

If anyone has been successful with these eggplant trees, ANY tips and advice would be greatly appreciated as I am truly only a beginner at this stuff. Thank you.
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1

Picture: 2

Picture: 3
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coolbreeze
Riverhills
27th January 2018 7:25pm
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Original Post was last edited: 28th January 2018 3:56pm
Fruitylicious1 says...
Hi Coolbreeze

Just some tips and advice about making your grafts more successful.

1. Use a grafting tape, if none, normal plastic strips or electrical tape is just fine. Tightly wound the tape around the graft joints extending over part of the rootstock and scion to make an airtight seal and to prevent accidental movement of the graft.

2.You can also cover the graft with plastic or paper bag and tied at the bottom with a wire with a drop of water at the bottom for added humidity before tying the bag.

3. Remove the plastic or paper bag after a week and the tape after a month.

4. You can also graft tomato onto your Devil's Fig so you can have tomato and eggplant into the same rootstock.

I have done this grafting technique with my trees with great success.

Notes:
Pic 1 - covered graft
Pic 2 - Taped up union graft
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1

Picture: 2
 
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Fruitylicious1
TAMWORTH,2340,NSW
28th January 2018 12:39pm
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Original Post was last edited: 28th January 2018 12:57pm
coolbreeze says...
Hey all,

Fruitilicious - Very cool how you have had great success with eggplant trees. Could you fill us in on....
What kind of graft you used?
What rootstock you used?
What variety/varieties did you use up top?
Did you do single or multiple grafts? (different variety on same tree)
Did you have weight issues when it started fruiting?
How long did the plant live for?
Did you also graft tomatoes onto the eggplant tree?
Do you have pics of your grafted plant? I would love to see.

Also thanks for your very standard advice. Stuff I'd seen and read many times before from other sites. That been the reason I chose to go ahead with trying my own eggplant tree in the first place. Would have much rather heard from your own first hand experiences and stories from your grafting venture hence my many questions.
However my experience has already differed for yours a little bit. That's what I love about these forums. My graft took nowhere near a month to heal. In fact, I unwrapped the tape (plumbing) at 2 weeks and graft joint was fully healed. And new growth was visible after 3 weeks. I would count that as successful so far. Fingers crossed it keeps going strong. Maybe weather and area had to do with different times for graft taking off.

On a bright note. My Kermit F1 variety finally sprouted on Sunday. Now I have 4 different seedling varieties to nurse until they are big enough to make a big different variety eggplant tree. Already filled with excitement =). I wont be adding tomato to it though as tomatoes get too bushy and ugly. I will document entire process this time round. I'm guessing it'll all be starting in 4-5 weeks time. Wish me luck!

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coolbreeze
Riverhills
30th January 2018 1:05pm
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coolbreeze says...
Hi all,

Dammit! Dammit! All my Kermit F1 and Italian heirloom seedlings are dead. I'm so shattered and pissed at myself! Silly me forgot and left them in the sun too long while I was hardening them up. That's going to set me back at least 6-8 weeks now. Have already put 4 of my 6 remaining Kermit seeds into seeds trays. They came in a pack of 10 and I want to save 2 seeds just incase. I might actually go back to Bunnings and see what eggplant seedlings they have in stock tomorrow. A small to medium variety of any kind will do nicely. My big S.torvam is completely out of shock and is showing vigorously growth so would be really good to get grafting ASAP.

Have you gotten a hold of seeds for the Devil's Fig yet Old Herb?
Are you still going to try your hand at an eggplant tree?
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coolbreeze
Riverhills
2nd February 2018 7:27pm
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Original Post was last edited: 2nd February 2018 7:31pm
Coriogirl says...
Hi there, I’m hoping if you have any spare seed of the solanum, you could send a few my way?
I’m in Victoria and not easy to find the rootstock.
Regards, Coriogirl
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Coriogirl
Corio
27th February 2019 9:21am
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Markmelb says...
Give Vasilis Nursery in Coburg a call
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Markmelb
MOUNT WAVERLEY,3149,VIC
28th February 2019 7:49am
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