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Growing citrus cuttings

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Xiem starts with ...
I would be interested in some simple do's and don'ts eg how wet, how warm, how sunny.
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Diego
 
24th February 2011 5:10pm
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Wayne says...
Can you grow citrus from cuttings??
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Wayne
Mackay QLD
24th February 2011 5:14pm
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Xiem says...
I've grown them before but lately I've been having a few fatalities. I suspect they have been a bit too wet.
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Diego
 
24th February 2011 5:23pm
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Jason says...
I grew my Lemon tree from cuttings, I can't remember what time of year it was but it took a long time to root, several months sitting outside in a pot
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Jason
Portland
24th February 2011 6:26pm
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Wayne says...
Would a cutting from a grafted tree stay as is or would it revert back to the root stock
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Wayne
Mackay QLD
24th February 2011 7:35pm
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Jason says...
A cutting will probably grow bigger than a grafted tree depending what rootstock it's on but every? commercial citrus rootstock is dwarfing so chances are good it'll be a much bigger tree. The amount of fruit and flavour might change slightly too but it'll be the same fruit
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Jason
Portland
24th February 2011 9:22pm
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Xiem says...
Thanks for that Jason. If rooting takes several months in your experience, I won't give in yet.
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Diego
 
25th February 2011 10:36am
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mark says...
Citrus will grow from cutting, but will always do poorly on their own roots. In heavy soil or times of continual rain they will die off due to root rot. A grafted tree is a lot better option and will be more vigorous and fruit a lot quicker. A grafted tree size will vary depending on what rootstock it is grafted and will always be bigger than a cutting grown one. My advice, don't waste your time with cuttings and just buy a grafted one and enjoy your fruit years earlier!
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mark21
Baulkham hills
27th February 2011 1:34pm
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MaryT says...
My friend took an arial root from my lemon tree with success. Easier than from a cutting, I imagine.
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MaryT
Sydney
27th February 2011 2:21pm
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Brad says...
what citrus? what soils? what after care?
some citrus take and go as cuttings better than others. Most likely if you try the types people tell you won't work, they can be made to work well enough for home gardens.

I just took a cuttings from a sour mandarin (rangpur lime) which apparently takes and grows well as a cutting. (Plan to do more when it cools down - Perth is 24-36 or so every day this week). Take from the top of the tree, get at least 4 nodes with current growth. make sure the base of the cutting is at a node, with 2 or 3 nodes in soil. I make a small scratch in the bark if there's semi-hardwood (which i aim to have some of, via earlier pruning). Remove most leaves and cut some in half on the cutting. less leaf, needs less moisture/energy while roots form. Keep the cutting away from direct sunlight. Keep the cutting humid. I have my cutting in soil mixed with coir (nice and moist). Covered with a cut plastic container (e.g. milk/juice) which has newspaper over it top and some sides to stop direct light. If cutting starts to wilt, try again. So far mine looks good after a week of crazy heat. too moist or humid it can rot. too little it'll dry out. experiment. too cool and the roots won't grow (bottom heat can be applied if needed - e.g. pot on an old baking tray). don't expect 100% success, so start plenty extra if you're in a rush.
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Brad2
G Hill,Perth
27th February 2011 3:37pm
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Jason says...
Just updating this about my cutting grown Lemon tree. It's growing well and fruiting well, about 12 feet tall at the moment but showing every sign of being a big tree one day. Quite useful tree since I started eating fish :).
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Jason
Portland
2nd June 2013 6:15pm
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Boris Spasky says...
When the juevenile vigour wears off, the Phytophthora will take over. Without exception.
Let us all know how long it lasts.
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Boris Spasky
 
3rd June 2013 9:14am
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Brain says...
apprently Yates Anti-rot is good against phytophthora, so anyone had any experience in using it? I've been trying to buy this stuff for ages but never see them in the shops. I intend to use it on my lemon seedlings, as they are quite susceptible to rot.
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Brain
Brisbane
3rd June 2013 9:51am
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Jason says...
Its about 9 years old now, phytophthora doesn't exist here so I'll be fine as far as that goes. I've actually never lost a plant to anything other than sunburn. The parent tree I got the cutting from wasn't grafted, most likely a seedling and it would have been at least 50 years old like the rest of that garden was. I'm going to try get a cutting mandarin going but they seem more difficult to get to take
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Jason
Portland
3rd June 2013 10:15am
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Original Post was last edited: 3rd June 2013 10:26am
Brendan says...
Hi Brian (or is it Brain?), I buy my Yates Anti Rot from bunnings up here, and yes, it does work. Unlike where Jason is, phytophthora root rot is rife up here! I've lost about 4 avocado trees and one orange tree to it :( Some of these avocado trees were over 33 years old.
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
6th June 2013 7:16am
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Brain says...
it's Brain, and for those 'young' enough, it's from the cartoon Pinky and the Brain. It's about pair of genetically altered lab mice hell bent on taking over the world. :)

Back on topic, I've been to a few different Bunnies here in Brisvegas and so far I've failed to find any. But you've given me hope. LOL.

(I could buy online but the freight now cost more than the bottle ... thank you Australia Post, thank you ... [sorry, just had to put that one in!])

I plan to use anti-rot a bit like toothpaste, as a preventive measure for the trees & seedlings. I've lost far too many lemon seedlings to trunk/stem rot, so need to bring on chemical assistance.
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Brain
Brisbane
6th June 2013 9:36am
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BJ says...
You can get a big bottle of Phosacid from the fruit club. Its about 6x the size for a quarter of the price...
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Theposterformerlyknownas
Brisbane
6th June 2013 9:52am
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jakfruit etiquette says...
Pretty sure I saw the Yates product at Kmart and Safeway or Coles in Vic.
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jakfruit etiquette
 
6th June 2013 11:17pm
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MaryT says...
Today I checked the three Chinotto cuttings struck on 24 September - one is obviously dead, one looks the same as the day I stuck it in the pot but one has grown new leaves!!!

The question is, do I dare pot up the one that's apparently doing well or should I wait longer? It's been just over five weeks.
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MaryT
Sydney
31st October 2013 1:33pm
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Julie says...
What's the hurry Mary? It won't have outgrown the pot in five weeks, surely?

I have Rangpur limes from seed which are around two years old, and still in small pots. When I check on them, although they are growing well, there's not much root growth. Of course, plants from cuttings may be different.
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Julie
Roleystone WA
31st October 2013 8:45pm
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Original Post was last edited: 31st October 2013 8:46pm
MaryT says...
Two years! Julie - I am amazed. I guess I do tend to pot things up rather frequently :) Nothing makes me happier - occupational therapy perhaps.
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MaryT
Sydney
31st October 2013 11:12pm
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Julie says...
Mary, I know exactly what you mean!
After doing some repotting, I always find myself looking around to see what other things I can pot. One of my favourite activities - definitely therapeutic!
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Julie
Roleystone WA
1st November 2013 9:49pm
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Julie says...
Would September be a good time to take citrus cuttings?
And would an aerial root mentioned above by Mary be the same as air layering/marcotting?
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Julie
Roleystone WA
30th August 2016 7:05pm
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Manfred says...
I'd hold off a month or two, Julie, and then do some softwood (or tip) cuttings when the plant is growing vigorously and the tips are a good size.

I've lent my travelling copy of Hartman and Kester so I can't recommend authoritatively for now, on IBA/IAA/NAA, but if you have any, you might want to try whatever you have, Some people also swear by honey but I haven't noticed any spectacular additional result from it. If it works, it certainly doesn't work in the same way as the commercial rooting compounds. Let us know, if you try it.

I've just, in the last hour or so, been giving away some nice meyer lemons grown from hardwood cuttings about 14 months ago, repotted in May and ready to go out into the ground. (No treatments used.) My experience with lemonades has been all bad though. I think they are one of those citruses which won't grow on their own roots.
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Manfred
tully
2nd September 2016 2:28pm
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Julie says...
Thanks Manfred.
" been giving away some nice meyer lemons grown from hardwood cuttings". I assume you mean plants, not fruit!

I want to try Seville orange, in the hope a cutting would produce faster than a seed.


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Julie
Roleystone WA
4th September 2016 9:43pm
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Trikus says...
Yes Julie thats what Manfred told me yesterday .. Finally got permission to take our local RFA branch on a trip to his place .
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Trikus
Tully
5th September 2016 9:44am
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Manfred says...
Don't listen to him Julie- there's nothing to see here, but I've learned to expound my suffering like a real sugar farmer.
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Manfred
tully
6th September 2016 8:15pm
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kenpo says...
I took 20 cuttings 2 years ago from mums orange tree. 2 survived. What I would like to know is I have some root stock and want to do some cleft grafts how long can I keep new cuttings I take from the tree in the fridge? The root stock will be big enough in February.
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kenpo
singleton
11th October 2016 12:54pm
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jakfruit etiquette says...
It is generally easier to use budwood approx the size of the rootstock. For storage purposes, thicker budwood can last a bit longer. Budwood should be stored in fridge, in sealed plastic bags.
The sticks should be prepared for grafting or budding ( not for cutting growth ) ie remove leaves at petiole and trim thorns off.

Any XS moisture in the bag will cause fungus and rot, too dry storage will cause drying out.
Too cold will cause freeze damage.
Temp changes will cause condensation.
Budwood should be fine to use as long as cambium layer is bright, and sticks are not too hard to resist the knife. Storage from now to Feb is possible by professionals, but its a long time for small things to go wrong.
How about getting the sticks sent closer to grafting time ??

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jakfruit etiquette
vic
13th October 2016 11:04am
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