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planting a lemon tree

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Carmela starts with ...
I'm a "new gardener" and nned some advice: is this a good time to buy a lemon tree or should I wait till winter has gone (I'm in Gordon, Sydney)

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Carmela
Sydney
20th July 2007 8:05pm
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Kath says...
Now is as good as any time to purchase a lemon tree. Many lemons are fruiting at the moment so do not forget if you new lemon starts to fruit you should remove all these fruits as they will stress out your young tree. We recommend that you remove all the fruit for the first two years to allow your tree to establish itself in the ground. If you are in a frosty area it would be best to wait until the threat of frost has passed and the soil has warmed up.
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Kath
Cawongla
23rd July 2007 3:44pm
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sivakumar says...
i am going to plant some lemon in my garden. i need advice quality of soil,and manure to be added and how to grow it may plz adviced
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sivakumar
trichy
18th November 2007 7:03pm
#UserID: 440
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Kath says...
Lemon trees like a fertile well drained loam soil. Although they will accept much less as long as they have good drainage. The require a ph of 5.5 - 6.5 and do not grow well in alkaline soils. They require extra moisture in dry periods, although this can be decreased in the winter. They need regular nutrient applications about 3 times a year in the growing season, a complete citrus fertilizer containing nitrogen, phosphorous, potassium, sulphur and calcium.
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Kath
Cawongla
22nd November 2007 9:01am
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Chris says...
For more years than I care to remember I have been trying to grow a lemon tree in my garden for nealy ten years. After some encouraging growth in early spring my fifth attempt is droping leaves, making buds and leaf growth has been dormant for 3 months. Its planted in a sunny sheltered spot but the soil is heavy clay. There are however some very healthy lemon trees in my neighbours gardens. Is there a secret to growing a lemon tree in heavy clay?
Im desperate.
Chris
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Chris15
Altona
24th January 2009 5:31pm
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SlickMick says...
Hi Chris,
If you have dug a hole in heavy clay and planted your citrus into it, it is doomed to failure. You need to mound some good free draining soil (not sand but one with plenty of humus) above the clay so that your plant will be above the clay. You probably need a mound about a metre in diameter flat at the top and about 25 to 30cm high with a little depression in the top that you water into. Citrus do not like wet feet. I would build your mound and get your lemon out of the clay asap and plant it into the mound. Do not plant below the level at which the plant was at before. Mulch around the mound making sure that you keep the mulch about 15cm from the trunk of the tree. Wait until the tree starts to shoot again before fertilizing.

Hope this helps
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SlickMick
 
24th January 2009 6:37pm
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Jantina says...
Good advice SlickMick.
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Jantina
Mt. Gambier S.A.
24th January 2009 10:55pm
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Chris says...
Thanks Mick, I will try again. I will keep the mound in place with sleepers.
Much appreciated
Chris
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13th February 2009 9:30pm
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GOODVIBES says...
Hi :) I have EUREKA LEMON TREE about three years old, before i planted it i did my research on where when and how i should go about it. It is performing miserably poor lemon growth has lots of buds but most will fall off the ones that make it rarely turn yellow the ones that do turn yellow are not edible its like they rot on the branch. i have mulched and fertilized being careful not to over do it. the soil is in good condition. i have a palm tree on its left side and a apricot tree on its right side in between the palm and lemon tree there is a knee high cactus. has any of these trees that the lemon tree is neighbouring have any role to play in its poor performance.?? should i rip it out and start again.?? the soill is not clay it is not perfect but ok. i threw in some steel in the base of the tree for iron when steel rusts i didnt see any improvement in the tree from that advice. i pruned the tree because i was told it was "sick" due to inflamation in sum branches so pruned all the branches that i saw what I thought was "inflamation" apparently there was supposed to be black ants living in the inflamation eating the centre of the tree away. when i cut open the branches that i pruned "NOTHING".. the leaves are green and the flowers are beautiful just the lemons are pathetic. please help :(
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GOODVIBES
victoria
8th July 2009 7:55pm
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Dekka says...
It may be that excessive Iron has reduced Potassium within the plant. Was the lemon tree generally increasing in size before you pruned it?
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Dekka
Newcastle
9th July 2009 9:57am
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amanda says...
Hi Goodvibes...how close are the palm and apricot and are they possibly shading out your lemons? or - the palm tree will rape n pillage all the water and nutrients eventually..(just my opinion - but they are sods of things :/...) Keep an eye on shading thru'out the day in summer and winter...
The iron cans etc provide iron in a form that is not readily available to the plant unfortunately. Too much iron reduces phosphate uptake. Better to treat deficiencies as they arise. If the leaves are nice and big n green then it doesn't sound like it wants for anything. Do the fruit ripen in summer? Does the fruit show any signs of insect attack?
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amanda19
geraldton.WA
9th July 2009 6:10pm
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GOODVIBES says...
Hi Amanda :) apricot tree is not shading the lemon tree as they were planted at the same time the apricot tree is small. The palm tree is about 4 metres away also not shading the lemon tree... The lemons have never rippened they will stay greenish yellow .. DO YOU THINK WHEN I WATER THE APRICOT TREE I AM GIVING THE LEMON TREE WET FEET the distance from lemon tree and apricot tree is about 3 metres.. they share the same soil and are not seperated by anything.... SHOULD I PRUNE A 3 YEAR OLD LEMON TREE IS IT STILL TO YOUNG TO PRUNE..? a friend has a lemon tree in there backyard does nothing to it and it is absolutley packed full of lemons... WTF..!! i spend money time energy and i get NUTHIN.. maybe thats what i am doing wrong i should do nothing and see how it does. thanx for the reply :)
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GOODVIBES
victoria
9th July 2009 7:11pm
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amanda says...
Ok Goodvibes..no need to 'shout' ;) ...It's not too young to prune - in fact u should be forming it's shape (at the expense of fruit) for first cupla years - you will grow a tree that can handle the load then.
If anything u will give the apricot wet feet b4 the lemon..apricots dont' like wet feet at all.
I'd try nothing too - 2 b honest. Seen many neglected lemon trees that give at least a dozen fruit..u shld get something at least..then - take it from there.
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amanda19
geraldton.WA
9th July 2009 10:53pm
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amanda says...
PS Goodvibes ... they need lots of water to fill the fruit.. my trees (3 yrs old) get at least 100 litres of water a week in summer (as recommended by agriculture dept for my area) - the fruit n leaves never drop even when 40 oC plus and furnace heat easterlies - and the fruit is juicy n perfect - unless your soil drains badly - you can't do any harm by giving them a few hrs on a slow trickle from the hose now n then. Generally - older trees have their roots down much deeper and find the ground water and need less. Good luck! :)
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amanda19
geraldton.WA
9th July 2009 11:46pm
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Kavin says...
Hi
I have a Meyer lots of lemon plant which I had planted about 8 month ago. It was flowering then and the plant has about 1/2 golf ball size lemons on it. I also have noticed more flowers sprouting.

My problem is that on a closer look there are black ants crawling on the plant, and the leaves are turning yellow. There are also black insects (don't know what they called) on the underside of the leaves.

What to do -
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Kavin
Brisbane
27th July 2009 11:03am
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Itdepends says...
You'v got aphids. The ants are coming for the honeysuckle produced by the aphids and spreading the black sooty mould.

Spray/remove the aphids and you'll fix most of the problems. The yellow leaves- fertilise the lemon. In particular- if the veins on the leaves are green while the rest is yellow- add iron sulphate or (if your soil is alkaline/high pH) use chelated iron.

Cheers,

Daniel
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Itdepends2
 
27th July 2009 4:13pm
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Pops says...
I am about to plant a Meyer lemon and a Tahitian lime into a large planter box and then espalier to a lattice.

My research tells me that I should plant into a well drained soil including some coarse sand. I live in Frenchs Forest, and my local nursery only sells bagged sand in two types; River sand, which is very fine, and Sydney sand, which I suspect is not suitable. How do I find coarse sand which is suitable for mixing with potting mix.

Hope you can help.

Regards

Pops
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Pops
Sydney
30th August 2009 8:41am
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