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Fruit trees in Perth WA

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Cuong starts with ...
Hi all, these trees are growing in Wilson, Western Australia
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1

Picture: 2

Picture: 3

Picture: 4
  
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Cuong
Wilson, Western Australia
18th August 2009 1:18pm
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Cuong says...
pictures above:

1) custard apple X 2
2) longan tree
3) jackfruit from tree in picure #4
4) jackfruit (grafted- 4 yrs in ground)

here are more trees...
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1

Picture: 2

Picture: 3

Picture: 4
  
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Cuong
Wilson, Western Australia
18th August 2009 1:28pm
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Cuong says...
above pictures:

1)sapodilla(chiku)tree
2)sapodilla(chiku)fruit
3)more longan trees
4)pomelo

more trees...
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Picture: 1

Picture: 2

Picture: 3

Picture: 4
  
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Cuong
Wilson, Western Australia
18th August 2009 1:37pm
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Cuong says...
above pictures are:

1)hydroponic grape tomato grown at work (i know these are not trees...)

2)bowen/kensington pride mango

3)bowen/kensington pride mango

4)jackfruit grwon from seed

also have lychee and water roseapple (wax jambu)
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Cuong
Wilson, Western Australia
18th August 2009 1:43pm
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Original Post was last edited: 18th August 2009 1:44pm
amanda says...
Great pictures Cuong - thanks for sharing! Your trees look great...what do u feed them?
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
18th August 2009 4:51pm
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Cuong says...
Hi Amanda,

the trees are actually my parents. They feed it NPK blue and chicken poo. Also they cover the top of the soil with old coco-peat from our hydroponic farm so that the ground doesnt dry out too much in summer (stresses the plants)

I think mulching it with most other things is good (like pea hay)

Very recently they are no longer using the above feed and have moved too organic based fertilisers

Synthetic fertilisers and chicken poo can do lots of damage to fruit trees as they are slow growing compared to vegetables (vegetables can take up nutrients faster)

therefore using organic based fertilisers will help/eliminate leaf burning and dropping off flowers/fruit
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Cuong
Wilson, Western Australia
18th August 2009 8:17pm
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Michael says...
Hi Coung,
I would love to have your Jackfruit and Sapodilla tree. My Jackfruit tree of 1 year has lost all it's leave during this winter in Sydney .It was doing so healthy and out of nowhere started loosing it's leaves and now there's none left. I'm waiting for Spring to arrive and if my Jackfruit tree does not recover I'll replace it with a Sapodilla tree.

By the way is your pummelo fruit sweet ? My three year old pummelo in a huge pot ( Bien Hoa variety from Vietnam ) is starting to put out lots of flowers . It does it ever year but I'm leaving them on this year to get at least some fruits. I heard that Australia's climate is not hot enough to produce sweet pummelo's .I also have the nam roi variety which I have high hopes for but it will be another 2 years before that tree can produce decent fruits.
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Wakeley
18th August 2009 8:22pm
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HappyEarth says...
Awesome photos Cuong. Thats a good collection of sub-tropical trees growing in Perth. How did the jakfruit taste?
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HappyEarth
Wollongong
18th August 2009 8:32pm
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culebra says...
absolutely brilliant stuff. Thanks for sharing. :)

oh it tempts me to move back to WA!
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culebra
Melbourne
18th August 2009 8:36pm
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Cuong says...
Hi all,

Michael: the pomelo is not sweet but not very sour either. I have another pomelo tree of a different variety at work, will bring a camera and take pictures of that.

Happy Earth: just cut down the fruit a few days ago, still trying to make it ripen so we can taste it! have 5 fruits in its first year of fruiting
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Cuong
Wilson, Western Australia
18th August 2009 9:01pm
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Cuong says...
more trees!!!
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1

Picture: 2

Picture: 3

Picture: 4

Picture: 5

Picture: 6
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Cuong
Wilson, Western Australia
18th August 2009 9:19pm
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Cuong says...
the above:

1) another longan tree
2) Bosworth 3 / Kwai Mai Pink lychee
3) lemone tree
4) two pomelo trees
5) wax jambu / water rose apple
6) duku tree (very rare in australia)
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Cuong
Wilson, Western Australia
18th August 2009 9:22pm
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Michael says...
Hi Cuong,
Seems like you or your parents have quite an establish garden there. So many exoctic fruits to see and taste. I am so envy of your Jackfruit tree. I've tried twice growing them and twice I'ved failed.However after seeing your tree I'm going to give it a third go at spring time.
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Wakeley
18th August 2009 10:11pm
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amanda says...
Hi Cuong.... I see your bore water has a lot of iron in it ... did your folks ever have the water tested at all? I am really interested in Perth bore water as I think it has some elements in it (like iron and possibly sulphur) that my plants just thrived on when I lived in Dianella.
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
19th August 2009 9:08am
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Jantina says...
Hi Cuong, I'm so impressed! they all look great. Encourages the rest of us.Thanks.
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Jantina
Mt. Gambier S.A.
19th August 2009 9:10am
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Cuong says...
yes, the bore does have lots of iron, not sure how many ppm - not ideal really...

trick is to irrigate to the leaves dont get wet! and then stained!!
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Cuong
Wilson, Western Australia
19th August 2009 9:21am
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Ellen says...
Cường

May I ask, how old is your JF tree ?

When you planted it, how long did it take before it start fruiting for you ?
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Ellen
Smithfield
19th August 2009 3:07pm
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Cuong says...
Hi Ellen,

The Jackfruit tree is a 4 yr old grafted tree
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Cuong
 
19th August 2009 3:26pm
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tecko says...
Hi Coung,

Where did you buy your grafted Jackfruit tree from?
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tecko1
Perth
20th August 2009 11:32am
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Ellen says...
Cuong

long term planning, that JF you've planted from seed (4yo) it look so close to your home?

I hopes it is a Dwarf in size or you won't let it grow over 2-3 m , b/c if it is not a Dwarf, and you let it grow as they do in Asia,,,definitely in 10+ yrs it's very destructive to the foundation of that home in the picture .
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Ellen
Smithfield
20th August 2009 11:58am
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Cuong says...
tecko: not sure where my parents bought their grafted tree from that is in the photo but I have just picked up a grafted JF for myself from Wandillas in Wattle Grove just this week

ellen: my parents are planing to cut the main shot of the tree to manage its growth - yes it would get very large if we let it go unattended
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Cuong
 
20th August 2009 10:09pm
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tecko says...
Thank you, Coung.
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tecko1
Perth
20th August 2009 11:21pm
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Marianna says...
Hi Coung,

Are you willing to sell any of your fruit? I am a fruitarian looking to find more tropical fruits to eat here in W.A other than bananas :)

Marianna
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Marianna
Rockingham, Western Australia
18th November 2010 3:03pm
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Cuong says...
Hi Marianna, sorry but the fruit arent mine, they are grown by my parents.

We have a fairly large extended family so the fruit doesnt stretch far!!!
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19th November 2010 1:07am
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VELU says...
Hi Cuong
Where I can find Jackfruit tree plant in perth. I want to plant in my backyard

Thank you
Velu
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VELU
CANNINGTON
17th August 2011 11:35am
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Elke says...
Hi, there is a nursery calles Tass1Trees in the Swan Valley. Joe has all sorts of trees for a good price. He is only open on weekends.
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Elke2
Calingiri
20th August 2011 3:35pm
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Elke says...
Hi, there is a nursery calles Tass1Trees in the Swan Valley. Joe has all sorts of trees for a good price. He is only open on weekends.
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Elke2
Calingiri
20th August 2011 3:35pm
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Ronald says...
Wandilla Nursery in 811 Welshpool Road, East Wattle Grove, Ph: 08 9453 9779.

Has all in stcok right now, they are open 7 days.
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Ronald2
Langford WA 6147
27th September 2011 1:48pm
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Shelley says...
Hi Cuong.

Have your Du Ku tree got fruit yet? Is it easy to grow? Thnx
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Perth
19th December 2011 2:53am
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andy says...
Lychee Tree - for the first time in 10 years, some fruits managed to stay on the tree due to late arrival of the windy period.
Almost ready to eat.
The tree is about 3m tall and has aproximately 500 fruits. We still lost about 90% of the fruits to the wind though, when they were much smaller.
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andy13
perth
13th January 2012 2:59pm
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snottiegobble says...
Cuong your photos are very inspiring & although we live further south
( generally 2 degrees cooler) I hope to try growing some of those fruit once there is more protection from cold winter winds!
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snottiegobble
Bunbury/Busso (smackin the middle)
13th January 2012 3:18pm
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Peter says...
Congrats, Andy!
What are the details of the tree?
I assume it is a marcotted plant.
Do you know the cultivars name?
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Peter36
Perth
13th January 2012 4:32pm
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Simon says...
Hi Andy,
Your lychee tree is very inspiring. Any tip on its care? I have been trying to grow some for the last 8 years. The Lychee tree (may be I should call it stick) does not seem to have much happening. To be fare, I had one that was about a meter tall in the ground but one year it died from root up wards. Did not know why. I start another one in the ground, but after five years, it is still about the same size! I bought another one (Kwei Mei variety) and grow it in a large pot (550mm). It is doing better that the one in the ground. It is now about 600mm tall after 3 years. I probably need to transplant to a larger pot next winter. 3 meter in ten years is very encouraging. If you can provide some tips to care the lychee plant would be most helpful.
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Simon8
Perth
13th January 2012 6:27pm
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amanda says...
Wow! That's great Andy! U must tell us all about it please?!
My small one drops it's fruit at the first hot easterlies too..(it's only small tho and in a tree sack - and I am always away when it happens)

I wonder if it's just a natural thing due to too much fruit - or a humidity and water issue...? It's a curious tree that really interests me...

(edit: can I ask what suburb u are in? Is your soil sandy?
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
13th January 2012 11:29pm
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Original Post was last edited: 13th January 2012 11:30pm
andy says...
Amanda, they usually lose their fruits when they are still green and very small to the wind. Once they get over the windy period or they become large, the size of your little finger, they tend to windstand the wind much better. from then on, it should be smooth sailing til they are ripe. We've been losing them to the wind for almost every year, except for this year, some managed to stay on, perhaps the windy periods arrived later than usual.

unsure which species it is, i planted it 10 years ago, and about 5 years ago it just took off. I suspect the root system had reached the water table about 3m down. i pruned it heavily every year. I had a couple of plants on a different properly with a much lower water table, they don't seem to grow as well. so i think it just needs plenty of water, and perhaps not so much heavy watering, but more regular watering.
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andy13
perth
18th January 2012 12:38pm
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amanda says...
Interesting info Andy. Yes - mine are very small and green when they drop too.
Mine in a shadehouse - but it still cops the hot easterly. It's just bad timing isn't it...I am hoping mine will do better when we take it south (Leschenault) where it's more protected by big trees..

Great pic tho...it's always really exciting to see people pulling off these kinds of fruit in WA soils/climate. Gives the rest of us hope! :)
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
18th January 2012 12:59pm
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lan says...
hi there
can i grow sampodilla in the big pot?someone said in perth is not good to grow sampodilla. my dad got a tree long time ago but never got friut.
can you give me advice
thanks
lan
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lan
perth
8th February 2012 2:30pm
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beerzy says...
sampodilla in the big pot?? Nah don't think so Ian and it sounds like your dad has a seed not air layered or grafted plant.
garden is best for plant
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beerzy
perth
8th February 2012 7:58pm
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Sav says...
Where can I get Coconut and sapodilla plants in Western Australia?
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Sav
Tom Price
17th February 2012 4:19pm
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Jim says...
Hi Sav, in Perth you could give the usual suspects a call such as Tass One or Wandilla. However, given that you are in Tom Price it may be cheaper to get them straight from Daleys.
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Jim
Fremantle
17th February 2012 4:24pm
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MJ says...
Hi everyone

Hopefully this is the right place for this question!

I've got a sand bowl at the moment (building site) and want to plant a lot of fruit trees. I wonder if people could share their successful varieties of things like apples, pears, plums, almond etc. I'm on the coastal plain, and would love to hear feedback from others in a similar location.

Thanks!
MJ
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4
Perth
6th April 2012 9:22pm
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Julie says...
MJ, which suburb? It makes a lot of difference. Some of the ones you mention wanting to grow may not do well near the coast.
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Juie 1
Roleystone WA
6th April 2012 9:28pm
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MJ says...
Hi Julie
That was quick! I'm in Floreat, 2 suburbs in from the beach. I'm looking at low chill varieties of everything as I want reliable fruiters, not something that I need an unusual cold winter to get anything, if you know what I mean.
Thanks!
MJ
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4
Perth
6th April 2012 9:31pm
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Gus says...
Hey MJ

I used to live in Floreat.

I reckon it may be worth getting some clay into your soil to help with water retention, and then fill it up with some good organic matter.
I have had good fortune with peaches (dwarf tree), feijoa(highly recommended) citrus, and a couple of exotics that you wont find in the shops.
I think you may need some cold weather for apples, but now sure for plums and pears.
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Gus4
 
6th April 2012 11:43pm
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MJ says...
Hi Gus

Do you remember what kind of peach it was?

I've been advised by others to add clay, and I will do so. I will also get in a truckload of compost/mulch/whatever I can get to try to turn our sand into soil. (In fact, I want to get rid of the soil altogether where we'll grow edibles and replace it, as we've bulldozed an old home and have therefore spread nasty chemicals all over the block.)

I know someone with a fruiting plum in my area, but she doesn't know what kind it is.

I see there are "tropical" apples which only need 150 or so hours, and I will play it safe and order those.

My gran, way back when, used to have a prolifically fruiting almond, but again no idea what kind.

There is a pear tree in the house I'm renting while we build - it seems to be a duo graft (though I couldn't for the life of me work it out!) which fruited prolifically this year; yet again, no idea what kind it was.

Thanks!
MJ
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4
Perth
7th April 2012 6:29pm
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Julie says...
MJ, when Italians moved into inner Perth suburbs last century, they always planted a fig, grape, mulberry,almond and lemon. These will all do well.

Friends years ago had a prolific apricot in Nedlands - don't know what it was, but could have been Newcastle early, which doesn't need as much chill.

Any chance you could get someone to graft the plum and pear you mention onto rootstock for you?
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Juie 1
Roleystone WA
7th April 2012 6:49pm
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amanda says...
Hi MJ...what about a lovely White Sapote tree...? The fruit should be in the shops soon (for a taste test) I can highly recommend them for Perth.

A couple of varieties are self fertile and others need a pollinator. Lemon gold is self fertile....and delicious!

I have a Tropic snow peach tree - lovely sweet n juicy white flesh...very reliable.
My plums get sunburnt - maybe some afternoon shade good for them. Low chill are the Japanese varieties.

Fuji and Pink Lady apples are low chill and pollination partners. There might be others?

Many of the more exotic sub tropicals can be of "hobby" value only and dissapointing and/or contrary...it pays to do some taste testing before spending lots of money and time on some of them (just my thoughts though)
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amanda19
Geraldton. 400kms north of Perth
8th April 2012 10:59am
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MJ says...
Amanda, I've never tried a white sapote, but I'll keep an eye out for them in the shops. I agree about the hobby factor, my garden isn't big enough for anything that isn't good eating.

How big is your Tropic Snow?

I've got a spot where I'm a bit worried there won't be enough sun, certainly afternoon shade. Maybe that is a good spot to try a plum. I've had advice that it might be a good spot for the apples as they will apparently take a bit of shade.

Julie, brilliant idea about seeing if I can find someone to graft for me. I hadn't thought of that.

Bye
MJ
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Perth
8th April 2012 1:26pm
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People who Like this Question Thithi
kim says...
Hi MJ

how about a jaboticaba tree? apparently they'll tolerate a fair amount of shade as well.

Amanda - have you got a white sapote tree? i've always wanted one too but thought they get rather big?
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kim14
perth
8th April 2012 6:41pm
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amanda says...
I don't think White Sapotes need to get too big..? Mine are grafted Lemon golds and at 3 or 4yrs old my trees are still under my height (1.7m)

Pruning is the answer though - with any fruit trees - if you take out the leader branch at a height you want to maintain (and do the same with any subsequent leaders/dominant branches down the track) then u should be ok.

It's not too hard once u get the hang of it...I managed to teach myself thru some books and then thru practice. I am average at pruning still - but the trees are very forgiving in general ;-)

Most of my trees (in ground) are just under 2m tall and are around 5yrs old and very productive - there is peach, apple, nectarine, many citrus types, white sapote, guavas, apricot.

I would expect many of these to be kept comfortably at 3m max. I guess if you spoil them too much you might get a huge tree and not too much fruit ;-)

I'd go for dwarfing rootstock wherever possible...so much easier to manage the trees.

It's important to know what wood to prune and when...as fruiting can be on current growth, 1yr growth - or old growth - depending on the fruit.

It's not rocket science..you just need to keep a little diary with your reminders in it :)


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amanda19
Geraldton. 400kms north of Perth
8th April 2012 8:29pm
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Julie says...
MJ, loquat is another one that grows practically anywhere. Fruit fly is supposedly a problem, but I don't get them on my loquat(in the hills). Can be pruned as amanda suggests. I pruned out the centre of mine when quite young, and it is still only about 2 m tall.

For your less sunny spot, how about blueberries? We have a lot of info on the forum on people's experience with those. More a bush than a tree, but some can get quite tall.
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Julie W
Roleystone WA
8th April 2012 9:22pm
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MJ says...
I do live in a fruit fly area but I'm planning to bag and net fruit to avoid having to spray. A loquat is a nice idea. A jaboticaba too, but I'd like to try the fruit first.

I'd like to try blueberries. Eventually I'll have quite a few shady areas.

I'd also like to try raspberries, but I think they'll need containment in a large pot!

MJ
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4
Perth
8th April 2012 9:32pm
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kim says...
thanks Amanda - i definitely have some re-thinking to do. A white sapote tree was very high on my list, but because i was scared of it getting too big (i'm a real novice, so haven't even started looking at pruning yet... :p ) i had it scratched off my list...

Wish i had some jaboticaba fruits i could offer you MJ (i'm yet to taste them myself) but by all accounts, they sound absolutely amazing. From reading alone, i've gone and purchased 6 trees and still want more.. :) if i get lucky and my trees produce some fruits in the near future, i will definitely offer taste test for anyone interested. :)
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kim14
perth
9th April 2012 2:22am
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denise says...
You should be able to get smaller growing white sapote variety in Australia as we have many in New Zealand. such as PIKE and LUKE.They wont go more than 4 meters and can be kept at 3 meters. You can keep them even shorter.Plant the new tree with another bushy tree right next to it at the same time. The other bush will crowd the middle of the sapote thus preventing taller growing upward branches that usually come from the middle. The side branches will grow outwards only at a handy low height for picking. You can do this dwarfing trick with many other fruit trees such as figs.Any side growth sneaking on too high an angle can be weighted down.
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denise1
 
9th April 2012 6:30am
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amanda says...
That's true denise...and I think Lemon Gold stays smaller because is has less apical dominant growth? Something like that anyway...it's a funny, straggly thing with droopy, whippy branches.

There should be information on each type on the Net...I'd say have a read of the "Problems with White Sapotes" thread - but it's massive now!? (not becuase of problems - but cos it's our Go To spot for discussing them...)

I can't recommend this tree highly enough. The fruit tastes similar to a custard apple I guess...but the texture of an avocado...(don't eat the skin though)
High flesh to seed ratio...a first class fruit for sure - and a tough plant with no problems (for me, so far)
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amanda19
Geraldton. 400kms north of Perth
9th April 2012 10:43am
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kim says...
I'm convinced. :) Just have to think of where to put it (i'm fast funning out of space!). I also want a mamey sapote... :D
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kim14
perth
9th April 2012 2:23pm
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amanda says...
Now that's ambitious kim! :D
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amanda19
Geraldton. 400km north of Perth
9th April 2012 8:50pm
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Gus says...
Are your sapotes dwarf amanda?

I would assume if you are keeping them small by pruning, they would still have an extensive root system?
I hope you can tell me otherwise as you have got me interested in them, but I only have a small area close to a wall. We kind of need that wall standing too.

On a side note I made a ripper of a tomato sauce this arvo. Thanks again for the recipe!
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Gus4
 
9th April 2012 9:27pm
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amanda says...
Hi Gus...the White.sap's have a very strong root system...I am stunned at the growth and strength of my trunks at their age...so are others in Gero who know more "stuff" about fruit trees ;-)

I suspect the root system travels fairly wide...only because my trees are the least fussy with feeding needs, by far and away. Their height is no problem at all though.

They have no "deficiency" issues at all...I feel that suggests a 'searching' root system...like Figs and Mulberries perhaps (just a gut feeling here so far though)

From what I can gather - the roots may be disruptive and I might agree there. But - they seem to be fibrous more than anything...perhaps I should cut a section down into mine and take a pic? I am curious too now.. :)
Who cares sometimes anyway...by the time our trees are big enough to cause problems - we may well be in old folks homes...?? :D

Wow - thanks for the Tom sauce recipe feedback...that's lovely :) I am very dedicated to sauce recipes...have a sensational one for a mango sauce...but I am actually bound by confidentiality on that one!? :-(
Makes awesome mangoe chicken nachos tho...umnnnn...yum..

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amanda19
Geraldton. 400km north of Perth
9th April 2012 9:53pm
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Gus says...
I am going to have to think about the white sapote as it will be less than a metre from a half wall half fence kind of thing. Having said that, it wouldn't be the end of the world if it was disrupted, just a pain in the bum. Maybe it would be better sticking it in a pot?

The sauce has a really nice tangy flavour. I found it took a really long time to thicken up, but it was worth the effort. I only had 8 kilos of tomatoes but they filled a huge stock pot. You must have an enormous pot to carry 15kgs of tomatoes?
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Gus4
 
9th April 2012 10:06pm
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amanda says...
A white sapote is worth it. It's our very own "tropical-like" fruit we can skite about that they CAN'T get to fruit in North QLD..?? (hehe) A mangoe rival for sure..

I have the stock pot from heaven Gus ;-) I had my laundry sink sized especially for washing it and my stove top sized for cooking with it too ;-)
Just couldn't find a dishwasher big enuf' to take it - grrr! :D

The tom's I love tend to be salad types or such and watery too..I have semi dried my selection this time (and vac-sealed frozen them) to concentrate their flavour and lessen the chance of 'over cooking'.

Only because I have not found a Roma or 'paste' tomatoe yet - that works here in our sands or such - and has the flavour punch I require...think I may have a go at breeding my own!?

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amanda19
Geraldton. 400km north of Perth
9th April 2012 10:28pm
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amanda says...
I will go out on a limb myself here...I like this fruit better than a MANGO!? OMG! Shhh.... ;-)

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amanda19
Geraldton. 400km north of Perth
10th April 2012 12:06am
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Mike says...
Some white sapotes fruit really well and a huge tree at kamerunga where I once worked had huge crops of beauties.They seem to do better on the tablelands especially in places that routinely get below 0.They seem to be a less popular fruit in the local markets like rusty's and there has been very few since the cyclone.Mission beach to Innisfail on the coast and the adjacent southern Atherton Tableland is where most of the trees grow.
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Mike25
 
10th April 2012 12:20am
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MJ says...
A white sapote sounds gorgeous, but sounds like the root system is too big for my garden. Bit of a shame. Still, I've got these on my list:

Apples, lemon, orange, mandarin, midgim berries, blueberries, raspberries (in a pot for containment), fig (in a pot) plums, mango, almond, grapes, dwarf tropical nectarine, dwarf tropical peach, strawberries, kiwis, passionfruit, and assorted veg dotted around the garden, and in a couple of veg beds.

I think I'm quite pleased with that list.
MJ
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Perth
10th April 2012 3:05pm
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Gus says...
MJ my dwarf peach was just a Trixie peach from dawsons garden world.

Can I also suggest to you that you keep your blueberries in pots with acid soil.
I have done everything to keep them in the ground to no avail. I have since given up and now my four potted blueberry bushes produce an abundance of fruit.
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Gus4
 
10th April 2012 10:55pm
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MJ says...
Gus, our garden designer drew the blueberries into the garden, but I agree with you - I think they'd be much better off in a pot. Even if the clean soil I bring in is acidic, I think our bore water is probably quite alkaline.

I'm so glad you told me about the Trixie - it is what was suggested, but I was worried it wouldn't fruit in Perth. I can't find anything about their chill factors.

Thanks!
MJ

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Perth
11th April 2012 9:46am
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Gus says...
Glad to hear
Cheeky how garden centres sometimes sell things that will never fruit, but I've had no probs with the Trixie.
I have read somewhere else on the forum that someone had added lemon juice to there water for blueberries? They said it works.
I tried for two year to produce blueberries in the soil adding everything from sulfur (regretfully) to peat moss, but didn't get a single berry.
In my pots I still have them covering my 4 bushes.
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Gus4
 
11th April 2012 10:49am
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MJ says...
Gus, what size pots do you have, and do you recall what kind of blueberries you have?

Thanks
MJ
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Perth
11th April 2012 5:11pm
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Gus says...
I think I have 2 mistys and two sharps. I got 2 varieties to help with pollination. I think these varieties are also used for commercial production in Australia. They are perhaps a tad smaller than Northern Hemishpere berries, but are very nice.
I got them from dawsons in Joondalup, but I think there is also a dawsons in Swanbourne.
They are in 76 ltr pots with Azalea/camelia soil. 2 of the pots get a lot of sunshine and two are quite filtered, and the quality of berry is much better on the filtered bushes. If they get too much sun the berries ripen way too quickly and you end up with tiny little "blueberry currants."
Next year I am thinking about throwing a little shade cloth over them on hotter days.
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Gus4
 
11th April 2012 7:41pm
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amanda says...
I agree with you Gus....with our alkaline sands and (likely) tap water - I am leaving mine in tree sacks too. Mine are in a shadehouse permanantly - they get loads of nice big berries (Sharpe and Misty also :) - so no problem with pollination either..

It's an incredibly difficult mission to acidify alkaline sands in the long term isn't it.....sulphur is harsh - and hot compost making is a labour of love!? :)
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amanda19
Geraldton. 400km north of Perth
12th April 2012 9:21am
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MJ says...
I went to one of those Beyond Gardening workshops, and they said the same thing about trying to change your soil. I will put them in pots.
MJ
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Perth
12th April 2012 10:23am
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amanda says...
I wish I had imported a heap of quality red loam, now, in hindsight MJ. It would have saved me 5yrs of hard labour and huge expense...they say sand breaks your heart - and it's true! :-)
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amanda19
Geraldton. 400km north of Perth
12th April 2012 4:06pm
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MJ says...
My plan is to bring in a huge amount of good stuff - probably 40% landscape mix of some kind, 40% clay and 20% compost. I figure I'll have a heart attack when I see the price, but then it should be plain sailing after that. And, since I intend to die of extreme old age in this house, it will be worth it to do it properly at the start.

Anyone got a dwarf macadamia? I went to a Beyond Gardens workshop and came home certain that I need a macadamia. I will only be able to fit in a dwarf in a pot, and I want to find out how shade tolerant they are. All my usual sources for this kind of thing are coming up blank. Any macadamia experts out there?

Bye
MJ
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Perth
12th April 2012 5:15pm
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MJ says...
Not sure if I'm allowed to post links here, so fingers crossed.

Here is a link to a Jackie French article on groves, which suggests that macadamias might be okay in those conditions:
http://www.jackiefrench.com/groves.html
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Perth
12th April 2012 5:20pm
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haakon says...
Mj, I bought 6m3 of half mushroom compost, half something else black to get my veg patch going and I havent looked back. It still needs enriching with compost, minerals, blood and bone etc but I got great vege results from day 1.
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Haakon
 
12th April 2012 10:04pm
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snottiegobble says...
Where are you haakon? Conditions, types of soils & the results from additives are so different in WA to the Eastern states!
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snottiegobble
Bunbury/Busso
13th April 2012 3:49pm
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Gus says...
MJ I think you may be able to get a macadamia nut tree from Tass one trees in Baskerville.
http://www.tass1trees.com.au/index.php

Try calling him first, but I had a feeling he had some macadamias last time I was there.
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Gus4
innaloo
14th April 2012 8:26pm
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MJ says...
I'm putting together a list and will email or ring him with it. I won't need them for a few more months (July, hopefully) but no reason I can't be putting in an order sooner.

Now that it looks like a macadamia will cope with some shade, I'd really like to have to dwarfs in pots.

Thanks!
MJ
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Perth
14th April 2012 8:31pm
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Gus says...
If you haven't been up that way before it may be worth a visit, it actually is not as far as it sounds.
They have quite a few things that you may never have considered or even heard of that might be a good idea. There is also a good honey shop near by.
I don't suppose you have Jaboticaba on your list? Mine is still years off fruiting, but it wins my vote for prettiest evergreen tree. Kind of a Japanese maple style that looks great and produces grape like fruit.
The one thing that I didn't consider when planting a lot of my treees is that fact that certain varities look very bare and depressing in the winter months. Jabs look great 365 days a year.
Just a thought!
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innaloo
14th April 2012 10:04pm
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kim says...
Blooming Nursery in Jandabup is definitely worth a trip as well MJ, they have a huge selection with very reasonable prices IMHO. I have been to all the other nurseries and maybe its just me, but they seem to have the largest collection of all. :) can't recommend them highly enough. And no, I don't know the owner or anyone that works there, but since going there end of last year, i can't seem to stay away.
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kim14
perth
15th April 2012 1:48am
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Gus says...
Never heard of it Kim.

They are much closer to me than Tass 1.

Will have to check them out.
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innaloo
15th April 2012 1:52am
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MJ says...
Gus, I have thought of a Jaboticaba off and on, but it hasn't made it to the list. The garden designer did, however, put a possible Feijoa in. I'm not keen on this as I think it is a fruit fly magnet, and I have enough of those planned. LOL. Maybe I could swap it for a jaboticaba. Do you know how big they get?

Will check out that nursery, Kim. Thanks!

MJ
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Perth
15th April 2012 10:58am
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Gus says...
I think both will become small to medium height trees, but the feijoa will bear fruit very soon if it is a named variety. The Jab can take 10 years or more to fruit and grows extremely slowly. Will be an ornamental for years, but extremely exotic in Perth if you can get fruit. They are often used for bonsai, as they are slow and pretty.
I still think I would grab a feijoa or two anyway. They don't seem to like our hot sun when they fruit, but I haven't attracted fruit fly myself. Have you tried the fruit before? They usually have them at herdsman around this time of year.
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innaloo
15th April 2012 12:22pm
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BJ says...
Hi MJ,
My feijoa are Bunning's Seedlings. They do fruit eventually - althought with the seedlings the fruit size, shape and taste is highly variable between the plants. I've not had any fruit fly attack them (the skin seems pretty thick) and they have created a convenient hedge.
I understand you're just starting out and may want to see how things go. I'm originally from the East so have made loads of mistakes. But - if you want to see how things cope my direct contact details can be found via the gumtree link I included (I'm letting my dwarf fig go - trying to tidy up). You'd be welcome to any cuttings you can get, and to see what has worked for me and what has failed.
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BJ1
Perth
15th April 2012 12:59pm
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kim says...
Gus, i had never heard of them either until late last year- i had a long list of nurseries, and basically went around to all the more well known ones first (Tass, Wandilla, Lena, etc) and to be honest, Blooming was quite low on my list as there weren't many reviews available on the web - but once i discovered them, i really can't recommend them highly enough...

They're at 121 Trichet Rd, Jandabup and are open 7 days.

I got the majority of my trees there, notably my 6 jabos ($68 each comparing with $100 at other places at the same size) that should hopefully fruit in the next year or so... fingers crossed!! :) I'm thinking of going back to look for a smaller jabo as i think he might have some in stock ($28 each?? not too sure, but his prices are very reasonable) that i hope to keep in a pot for a while.

A price comparison example - i purchased a very tiny soursop from another nursery for $48. A week later i discovered Blooming and their soursop trees that were 3 or 4 times the size of mine going at $28ea!!
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kim14
perth
15th April 2012 1:19pm
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MJ says...
Gus, I will go to Herdsman and see if I can try the fruit.

BJ, that would be great! I left a message for you on your page about your almond - wondering if you had an update now it has been longer in the ground?

Bye
MJ
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Perth
15th April 2012 1:37pm
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Gus says...
I will have to check them out.
Wish I had heard of them earlier.

Are they a fairly new place?
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innaloo
15th April 2012 1:43pm
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Gus says...
have you had any great feijoas B.J with jellyish centres?
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innaloo
15th April 2012 1:44pm
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kim says...
I don't think they're new, just that they haven't really advertise themselves yet for whatever reason.

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perth
15th April 2012 2:25pm
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MJ says...
Kim, they don't seem to have a website that I can find. Will have to pop out there with my list. (Which is getting longer thanks to this thread, LOL.)
MJ
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Perth
15th April 2012 3:26pm
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BJ says...
Hi Gus,
I've four feijoas ... one tastes like strawberry bubble gum, but its fruit are the size of a thimble - just a tiny smidge of fruit inside! Another isn't that exiciting to eat but is the size of a bantom egg with jellier sort of bits inside. They all have quite thick rinds (2mm?)
MJ, my e-mail is belinda(dot)white(at)optusnet(dot)com(dot)au
I did try to respond to your almond question ... but I think the computer hates me!! You'd be welcome to see the almonds for yourself - they aren't looking the best as I'm pulling off leaves for autumn - but they are tough and I had some very yummy almond and apricot jam this year!
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BJ1
Perth
16th April 2012 9:43pm
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MJ says...
Ah, so they fruited for you? That is good to know. My garden designer wasn't sure they'd fruit down on the coastal plain, but I *really* want an almond! This isn't their prettiest season, is it? Ah well, I always think it is best to see these things at their worst!
MJ
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Perth
16th April 2012 10:44pm
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MJ says...
Anyone have any idea how much shade apples will tolerate? I have a book that says they'll take some, but I'm a bit concerned about where I am going to put them. :(
MJ
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Perth
18th April 2012 1:19pm
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amanda says...
Not sure about how much overall shade for apples MJ - but afternoon shade in the summer would suit them I reckon! :)

My apples find the all-day sun way too much for them here.

Many fruit trees will not fruit as well if they are too shaded....but sometimes I wonder if we can get away with a little bit of shading from Perth->North as the sunlight is so intense.

Would be interesting to see what others have achieved.

How much shade are you looking at do you think?
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amanda19
Geraldton. 400km north of Perth
18th April 2012 9:10pm
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MJ says...
Amanda, it is morning sun, but I'm worried about winter. I will see in the next few months how much sun there is.

I have room elsewhere for some pots, but it is directly south of a north-facing screen, so I think that would be even worse. May be a good spot for my blueberries, though.

MJ
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Perth
18th April 2012 9:13pm
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amanda says...
I'd like to know more about this issue too MJ.
Winter might not be such a problem as they are deciduous anyway? But it's a good point MJ - as not everyone has full access to the sun in suburbia these days...especially with block sizes shrinking etc..

I have not seen any 'research' on what might be optimal direct sunlight hours, for fruit trees.

(but south of a north facing screen doesn't sound good for apples...the blueberries should be very happy though :)

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amanda19
Geraldton. 400km north of Perth
18th April 2012 9:23pm
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BJ says...
MJ,
I've got fruit trees on four fences of my property; nothing has suffered from too much shade. My biggest recommendation is to wander around the suburb and look at what other people have. There is a pretty cool garden for tropicals on the corner of Belmont Ave and Alexander Rd; an a few more people with several fruit trees along Alexander Rd. There is a guy at Bunnings (Alexander Rd and Abernethy Rd) that actually seems to care about plants and is very helpful with good local knowledge (he also recommends other nurseries if they have stock Bunnings doesn't).
I'm more than happy to show you where my apples are growing and tell you what I've had to move (mostly because of too much sun!). My apples have to have their leaves ripped off them - perhaps they would be happier with less light?!
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BJ1
Perth
18th April 2012 10:07pm
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amanda says...
Thanks Perth-BJ - that's good info...I wonder if other Perthites have had similar problems with too much sun..?

"Full sun" has been too much for almost ALL of my fruit trees....bar the very toughest and/or "neediest" (acerola, passionfruit, fig etc)
I realise it's a bit hotter up here - but it's not that far and very comparable, I feel.

What really annoys me are plant labels in general....many that have stated Full Sun - have not coped at all here...I wonder if that is "Full Sun (but in Victoria)" or something?! :D

It's not the same all across Aust...and I sure am tired of the lack of understanding for the WA climate :-(

Anyway - I was too lazy to rip my apple leaves off this last season BJ...and it flowered and fruit really well..!? (apples got sunburnt in the end tho..lol..bloody sun...)
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amanda19
Geraldton. 400km north of Perth
19th April 2012 10:57am
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amanda says...
(and for those who are struggling to find room for stuff...or are not tropical enough...there is always a great supply of lovely fruit n things at the Asian shops...(shh!) ;-D

Here is my feast for today...all fresh frozen and taste just as good as the real ones I have ever eaten...and all under $10kg...
Can also get whole frozen Kachai, lemongrass, laksa herb...all very cheap and much easier than trying to grow more often than not...even canned longons are great.

The Honey Jackfruit in this pic is superb BTW...
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1
  
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amanda19
Geraldton. 400km north of Perth
20th April 2012 5:56pm
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GardeningAustraliaWanabee says...
Full sun means full sun. If you chose to grow fruit in an arid desert, well you're fighting against nature and really it's a great waste of resources (water) in trying to fight it. Don't blame the plant labels.
Even the Arabs in the Middle east have woken up to this fact and are buying arable land in Africa and elsewhere.
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GardeningAustraliaWanabee
 
20th April 2012 11:53pm
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amanda says...
Possibly GAW, but that's drawing a long bow perhaps. Perth is not an arid desert, nor is Geraldton. Sometimes we need to adjust our microclimates to achieve better results - no matter where we live.

It's quite possible that "Full sun" is not always ideal for Perth and north. It's worth discussing as that's how we learn and improve our gardens...which is part of the reason we are here on this Forum.

Certainly my own experience in my climate has taught me this much, even many of the non-indigenous Aust plants can require small adjustments to their micro-habitat. Nothing new there...??

There are, of course, no-brainers that simply won't do well without large inputs...I guess it's a personal choice whether you grow them or not, though.

Where did you say u were GAW?
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amanda19
Gerladton. 400km north of Perth
21st April 2012 2:36pm
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Gus says...
Kim you are right. Bloomings in Jandabup are they best fruit tree place I have seen in Perth.
Wish I had seen them earlier.
I paid $100 for a Jabotiba tree elsewhere, and saw Bloomings with much better looking trees for only $68.
We got a few plants aswell that were great prices.
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Gus4
innaloo
21st April 2012 4:19pm
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MJ says...
Amanda, I'd love to see tags for our own state - it might say 6 hours sun in Perth, 3 in Broome, or something like that. It would take a lot of the guessswork out.

I emailed a fruit tree company recently re chill hours and got a fairly vague response, which suggested to me that I shouldn't buy any of their trees on the coastal plain of Perth. :(
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4
Perth
21st April 2012 8:10pm
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snottiegobble says...
There has been at least one deletion on this thread.
One of them asks Gardening/Australia/ Wannabee to elaborate on his/her post 20th April. I see no reason for this action & so ask GAW to explain also!
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snottiegobble
Bunbury/Busso
21st April 2012 10:38pm
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kim says...
Hi Gus

I agree, Blooming does seem to be the best nursery in Perth for quality plants at reasonable prices. And the range of exotic fruit trees is larger than any other nurseries i've been to.

The majority of my trees came from Blooming and i'm always wanting to go back for more. :) In fact, i'm hoping to go back tomorrow - on my last visit, i noticed a lot of his miracle fruit plants had berries on them, i'm thinking of buying another one...

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kim14
perth
22nd April 2012 2:42am
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MJ says...
Did anyone see that Tass1 is going to have a stock clearance auction?

I thought I'd go down ahead of time and have a stickybeak and see what he has.
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4
Perth
22nd April 2012 11:18am
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Gus says...
He does one every year MJ.

I have never been but might be worth checking out
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Gus4
innaloo
22nd April 2012 11:58am
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MJ says...
That's worth knowing, Gus. Thanks.
I need a lot of stuff as I'm planting a new garden, so I will go and see.
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4
Perth
22nd April 2012 12:01pm
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Ben Silver says...
Yes it was my post that got deleted.I wonder why?
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Ben Silver1
Sydney
22nd April 2012 12:01pm
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Original Post was last edited: 22nd April 2012 12:02pm
Ben Silver says...
here we go. apparently it was personal.I don't know how that can be so.Seems we have some hypocrits on this forum.

"what an odd comment GardeningAustraliaWannabee? Would you like to support that further perhaps?
Status: Deleted; Reason: Personal 2012-04-20 23:57:55"
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Ben Silver1
Sydney
22nd April 2012 12:04pm
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snottiegobble says...
Ridiculous Ben. I suspect that GAW is actually someone else! Correy will be notified!
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snottiegobble
Bunbury/Busso
22nd April 2012 12:12pm
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Jim says...
Hi MJ

With regard to Tass1 auctions, from my last experience there were some bargains but also people bidding over the retail price which was really annoying after waiting hours for an item to come up.

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Jim
Fremantle
22nd April 2012 1:46pm
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MJ says...
Jim, I was planning to go down ahead of time and writing down retail prices. If I get anything then it is really 2-3 months early, so it has to be a worthwhile bargain, if you kwim.
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Perth
22nd April 2012 4:24pm
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Jim says...
By all means it may be worth it, but last year I did exactly that and in the end there are people who didn't check or didn't care about the price and paid overs. I would only consider it again if there were a bunch of plants sold in a lot that were worth buying all at once, as there may be bargains to be found that way.
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Jim
Fremantle
22nd April 2012 4:38pm
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Gus says...
I haven't been to the auctions as I only have a normal sized block, and assumed that most of the buyers were probably looking for job lots with like 100 mandarin trees or something.
I couldn't be bothered spending a whole day waiting for a bargain anyway, as I normally only buy a tree or two at a time.
I suggest you build your garden slowly M.J as I have found with a bit of trial and error you learn what you like and what you don't.
I have changed my mind about a lot of things, and constantly swap and change things.
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Gus4
innaloo
22nd April 2012 5:36pm
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BJ says...
MJ,
If you're willing to take cuttings (mulberries, feijoa, guava etc) then you've a good chance at getting something you know thrives in the environment. Many of my plants are grafted, but I've taken a few more mulberry cuttings (no space for them, so they'll be donated to anyone who wants them if they root) and I'm willing to try feijoa / guava / sublime etc. You can save money and get a plant you like. Also, if you check out gardens you can see what plants cope well, and which ones don't. I made several mistakes by putting in "exotic" plants not suited to WA and they have struggled (Jap plumbs for instance). Much easier to have something suited to the area! I did, however, purchase over 30 trees in the first instance from the supplier (Olea) so they were half the price of a nursery ... but you need an ABN and to sweet-talk the company.
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BJ1
Perth
22nd April 2012 6:22pm
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amanda says...
I agree SG! Personal?? Eh?? Lol. Hey BJ - what problems are you having with your Japanese plums?
Which ones do you have? (I just became aware that the chill hrs needed for some are higher than what even Perth can supply..??)
I have had lots of problems with them too.
Don't let them get direct afternoon summer sun, they can't take the hot days at all.

Agree about being seduced by some "exotics" - have to be very careful for WA climates. Many are dissapointing also. There are the tried, tested and true though (mangoes, carambola, jujube, white sapote, dragon fruit etc)

Never be afraid to pull something up if it's not performing or what u like...and replace it/try with something else :)
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amanda19
Gerladton. 400km north of Perth
22nd April 2012 7:24pm
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Gus says...
Are the white sapote really that great Amanda?
I bought one from the markets and although it was very sweet, but I didn't find it to be interesting.
i think this is the sort of thing being mentioned on the Jab forum as I can say that the sapote I tried kind of put me off them
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Gus4
innaloo
22nd April 2012 7:47pm
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amanda says...
I believe it's always worth having multiple tries at a fruit? If I had only ever tasted the horrid floury end-of-season nectarines in the stupor market then I reckon I would believe nectarines were awful too?!

And - good homegrown fruit is very hard to beat also.
My homegrown wh.sapotes ("Lemon Gold") are some of the most sensational fruit I have ever had...certainly up in the "A" grade. They are not as big n flash as the commercial ones I have tried...but they taste better.

Taste buds are different too though. Personally - I am not a big fan of "overly" sweet fruit...I prefer a little bit of sub-acid. I find the Lemon Gold has that and it gives the fruit a better complexity..? (hence the 'lemon' part I guess) But sure..there are poor examples of what should be good fruit. Which is what Mike is saying. I must agree too.

A recent revelation has been the new pineapples like "Mareeba Gold" etc....they are a great improvement on the old style pineapples and remind me very much of the lovely ones to be had in Asia...?

White low chill peaches...omg! I love my Tropic Snow peaches...they are a vast improvement on some of the awful peaches in the shops now... :-(

It's also important where the fruit is grown...many fruits suited to warmer climates just won't achieve the same sweetness in a cooler climate - eg: you could grow pineapples in Perth..but would they taste sweet or sour?

I think Dragon fruit are great too..they can be so easily grown in Perth - but folk don't really know what they are...?
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amanda19
Gerladton. 400km north of Perth
22nd April 2012 8:14pm
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MJ says...
BJ I tried cuttings from a girlfriend's mulberry and didn't have any luck. I might try again. I also tried from the pear I mentioned earlier, but again, no success. :( (I did have a lot of success with other cuttings I took, so I'm not taking it too personally.)

Gus, the garden has been designed with all our staples in, (hopefully) in a way that will give us some fruit most of the year, so I've got a specific list of trees that I want to put in. Fortunately we lived on the site for 14 years prior to bulldozing, so we know where the light is etc. Also, some of the trees are important for our climate management inside the house, so they have to go in asap.

Amanda, how large is your tropic snow, and does it take a bit of shade? I've found (somewhere) a dwarf tropical peach and a nectarine that I'm keen to try. It will need to be kept small in this spot.
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4
Perth
22nd April 2012 8:33pm
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Mike says...
MJ mulberries are reasonably easy to strike.If take 15cm sections that have just gone from green to woody they have a good chance.Chop the leaves off and tip 1 or 2 weeks prior and take it off when buds are forming.Dip in rooting powder,leave in warm shade and don't overwater and do 10 to 20 to make sure there'll be some survivors.
Amanda Mareeba gold is not quite as good or large as hawaiin gold,and some with letter and number names but they sure make the old cayennes seem pretty ordinary.I have a massive hawaiin gold I have to chop up tonight before it gets over-ripe.
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Cairns
22nd April 2012 9:03pm
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kim says...
Hi All

Came back from Blooming with two small feijoa trees/shrubs!! I've never tried the fruits until today but have always wanted a tree after reading about the ornamental value of this tree. I've seen them @ Blooming on previous visits but didn't want to buy the big trees so i was ecstatic when i spotted the last two small trees near some flowering type plants - just had to have them! Guess the sapote, sapodilla and second miracle fruit tree will have to wait for another day...

When i mentioned i had never tasted the fruit before, the owner, Mr Wa generously offered me some fruits from his tree - they taste great! i don't think the ones i had were fully ripe as there was no jelly like centres, but still very sweet and tasty. Here's to hoping my trees will give me fruits of the same quality in time... :D
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kim14
perth
23rd April 2012 1:10am
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Gus says...
I think its the best thing you can have in your garden. Conratulations!
I was there yesterday too, and gotta say the men there are very friendly and helpful.
Did you get named varieties of feijoa?
very important.
You can buy them from coles or fruit markets for about $1.80 or so this time of year.
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Gus4
innaloo
23rd April 2012 10:30am
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amanda says...
I dream of some good feijoas too Gus...! MJ my tropic snow is roughly 2 or 2.5m tall..? It's about 4 or 5yrs old now.
Most of my trees are not very tall considering their age...I guess the salt here keeps them a bit stunted :) (I am coastal and have saline water)

I also prune to keep trees to a height that is easy to work with...? They carry plenty of fruit for us. It's easy to prune them once u get the hang of it...it's just a matter of heading dominant branches off a bit - so that they don't "take over" and get too tall/big.

I didn't let my trees carry fruit until they were 2yrs old (in ground age) - and even then I only kept strategic fruit (to weigh down branches) for the next year. This allowed them to develop a nice strong framework. My little west indian lime (1.5m) carried 15kg of fruit last season, no problems.

In my next garden I plan on using as many dwarfing rootstocks as I can get away with., for fruit trees.
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amanda19
Gerladton. 400km north of Perth
23rd April 2012 10:58am
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Gus says...
I got a couple of beautiful feijoas off my tree today.
I think the later developing ones are better in our climate as they have enjoyed cooler nights when ripening.
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Gus4
innaloo
23rd April 2012 9:16pm
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amanda says...
Lucky you Gus! Are your plants homebrand/generic ones or named? How old etc...?
Mine is a lonely Bunno's generic - it flowers but needs a friend to make fruit I think...
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amanda19
Gerladton. 400km north of Perth
24th April 2012 10:30am
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Gus says...
I have a nazimet and a mammoth that I got about 2 years ago when you warned me off the seedlings.
Within a year of plonking them in the ground i had about 3 fruit, and this year I have had probably 30 fruit.
The trees are probably only 4 or 5 feet high, but seem very productive.
I ate a couple more this morning that were good aswell.
They are so easy to keep and look good too.
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Gus4
innaloo
24th April 2012 10:38am
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amanda says...
Great Gus! That was really fast?! I would have pulled mine up and started again if I had known that :)

I don't suppose we can import these guys anymore - guavas were caught up in that ban due to the myrtle rust too...?

Hang onto them Gus - we may all be beating a path to your door for cuttings one day!? :D
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amanda19
Gerladton. 400km north of Perth
24th April 2012 10:49am
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nick says...
Hi Gus.
How do you go with the BLESSED FRUIT FLY. I am in gwelup, my tree is approx 20years old produces "milions" of fruits each year, but i am yet to enjoy one that has rippend on the tree. I have tried heaps of fruit fly controls,
i have used bought baits,home made baits
wives tales bait but nothing has worked
i am open to any suggestions and getting desperate. I donnot want to cut the tree down,but it very frustating looking at all that fruit and not being able to have a feed.
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nick12
perth
24th April 2012 6:18pm
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MJ says...
Nick, I have had fruit fly issues too. I'm planning to keep my trees small enough to net (either the whole tree, or bunches of fruit) with the fruit fly net. Apparently it needs to have mesh no larger than 2mm?

Fruit fly are such a menace. :(
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4
Perth
25th April 2012 8:35am
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Gus says...
that sounds ominous.
I haven't seen one in my garden.
I wonder if there is anything I can do to avoid them before they come?
No probs, I can send you a cutting if you need one Amanda.
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Gus4
innaloo
25th April 2012 10:13am
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Gus says...
Anyone else had success beating fruit fly?
Have you tried bagging them in mesh Nick? I suspect that is probably the only way.
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Gus4
innaloo
25th April 2012 10:20am
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MaryT says...
Yes, Gus. The organza bags are 100% effective since I started using them, on John Mc's recommendation, for figs, guavas and even rocoto tree chillies (fruit flies favourites). Only down side is they are too small for covering larger clusters of fruit.
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MaryT
Sydney
25th April 2012 10:27am
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Gus says...
I have never heard of them?
Where do you get them from Mary?

Here are the pics of my feijoa trees.
They don't look like much but they have been great.
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1

Picture: 2

Picture: 3
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Gus4
innaloo
25th April 2012 11:03am
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MaryT says...
Gus, yes we've had lots of discussion on this site about it - here's one link on the topic:
http://www.daleysfruit.com.au/forum/fruit-fly-exclusion-bags/
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MaryT
Sydney
25th April 2012 11:58am
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MJ says...
Mary, do you know if it is silk organza, or a synthetic, and also what colour it is? Do you think colour would matter?

I have a length of gorgeous embroidered silk organza in a lovely light purple. It was $5/m which is *really* cheap and I bought it because I loved it, but with no real use for it. I like the idea of using a silk organza for fruit fly bags (I'd make my own) as it is a bit stiff and would hopefully not droop down onto the fruit, but I'm wondering a little about whether the colour would matter...
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4
Perth
25th April 2012 4:05pm
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MaryT says...
MJ - Consensus is white is best but some swore by blue. I've used silver (because they were on sale) and they did the job. I'm pretty sure they're synthetic. Making your own is best because you can tailor them to size.
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1
  
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MaryT
Sydney
25th April 2012 4:40pm
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MJ says...
Oh, how pretty! It would look like a Christmas tree!
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4
Perth
25th April 2012 6:07pm
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Mike says...
My mexican cream guava tree has them all over (thanks Mary) and it looks like it is walking down the aisle with the sugar apple next to it.
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Cairns
25th April 2012 6:29pm
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nick says...
Thanks all you guys for my inquiry about fruit fly,i am off to buy some of the suggested cloth and talk the missus into sewing them up for next season.
Thanks again and if anybody wants a macadamia nut seeding let me have your email. You can see the Mother tree in fruit.
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nick12
perth
25th April 2012 10:39pm
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John Mc says...
And if she doesn't comply Nick you can buy them off EBay for from memory $20 to $30 per hundred complete with draw string attached. It's very convenient having a drawstring, I think that's what makes them so attractive to use.
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JohnMc1
Warnervale NSW
26th April 2012 11:01pm
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MJ says...
Anyone grow fruit trees (dwarfs, I guess) in wine barrels? Any tips for a newbie? I assume that I will need to pay more attention to watering, and keep it well mulched and fertilised, more than in the ground.
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4
Perth
28th April 2012 3:16pm
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kim says...
Hi All

I don't think my feijoas are named varieties Gus, but i'm an optimist (most of the time anyways... :) and if they taste half as decent as the ones i had at Blooming's then i'll be quite happy indeed. :D

MJ - i'm also a newbie, and have found some great tips searching the main forum for "fruit trees in pots".
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kim14
perth
29th April 2012 6:25pm
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Gus says...
I haven't used wine barrels but have used similair sized pots and had good results.
In some ways it is even preferable in that you can easily moderate the amount of nutrients and water the trees get.

Good on you Kim. i am no expert, but can only speak for good experiences with a named tree. You may well get good fruit anyway. You could even check with the guys at the store if it is named or not.
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Gus4
innaloo
29th April 2012 10:44pm
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MaryT says...
My fruit trees are all in pots MJ and they do well as long as you water and fertilise regularly in small amounts (or they just get washed out anyway). You will need to prune more often. Fruit will be the same size as trees in the ground but you won't get as many as you tree size will be limited by the size of the pot.
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MaryT
Sydney
30th April 2012 7:52am
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amanda says...
Hey guys (n Gus) the white sapotes from Margaret River have landed in my F&V shop this week. Gus - yes they are a bit blander than my own ones (just had ate one!)

I find home grown usually tastes better for most stuff...but it could also be a variety issue too. My Lemon Gold definately more fragrant and a bit more complex and tasty.

jason best person to ask about this tho.
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amanda19
Geraldton. 400km north of Perth.
1st May 2012 12:21pm
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MJ says...
I saw a choc sapote at bunnings the other day. Had to put my hands in my pocket and leave quickly!

Mary T, how big are your pots, and did you start with dwarf trees? I was reading an discussion where a couple were wondering if it was worth dwarf varieties when the pot would naturally dwarf the tree. It would certainly widen my range of possibilities.
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Perth
1st May 2012 8:39pm
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Gus says...
I would personally avoid putting large trees in pots. I am just a novice gardener so don't have the skills to avoid trouble.
I have had problems with trees becoming root bound and being too big and unmanagable. I think to avoid root bounding you may have to pull the tree out the pot and cut the roots back.
I also think I nicely proportioned dwarf in a decent sized pot looks better than something thats clearly overgrowing.
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Gus4
innaloo
1st May 2012 10:29pm
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MJ says...
I was told that I should repot every 4 years. I did the great gardens workshop a few weeks ago and he said to swap 1/2 of the potting mix for sand and that would avoid that "slumping" or whatever it is called where the level of potting mix drops down over time and you could avoid repotting for 10 years.

I've got a couple of large potted ficuses and repotted them a few years back, which involved putting them down on their sides, pulling it out, trimming the roots, and putting it back with extra potting mix. It was a huge job as the pot with tree must weigh 100kg and took two of us. If I can delay the repotting to 10 years that would help!

Then again, I thought they needed repotting recently, but wasn't able to due to not having the new pots. I gave them a good feed and lots of water and the new growth is amazing. I'm cutting them back now to get a better shape.
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Perth
1st May 2012 10:57pm
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MaryT says...
MJ I always say to people DON'T plant trees in pots if they have a choice. I don't; it's either looking at a patch of concrete or use containers to grow them. I could have planted small shrubs but I like to walk beside something taller than me and pick fruit.

Yes it is a gigantic task to repot overgrown trees especially when you need room to do it and the reason I have containers is because I don't have room. Luckily I had the use of my neighbour's car space right next to my garden (which was my car space).

Yes it is important to choose the right type. I planted a plum that shot up so much in a couple of years and wanted to keep growing that I had to give it away (which as it turned out is a great solution compared to repotting and pruning). I didn't have the heart to mulch it as it is a beautiful tree. It is now growing in the ground at a young couple's home; their bare backyard was instantly filled with my overgrown trees and I got the pots back to start again :)

I'm new to dwarfs so I only have a couple. Too soon to tell whether they're a good idea. The others I find I need to prune them to the size of the pot. Trees need large pots. My largest are 70cm; I don't have room for anything bigger and anyway they'd be too heavy to handle. They are plastic so although I can't lift them I can push and pull them around. I am only five foot two (that's a measurement of my height for you young ones)

The thing I have to say about putting sand in the mix would be that it would make the pots heavy. Also sand does not hold water or nutrients.



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MaryT
Sydney
2nd May 2012 3:51am
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amanda says...
This guy may be worth a visit too MJ...? He has a backyard full of potted fruit trees...? He sounds really interesting too :)
http://www.gumtree.com.au/s-ad/leeming/other-home-garden/unusual-exotic-fruit-trees/1001135567

(his name is Tri Hoang)
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amanda19
Geraldton. 400km north of Perth.
2nd May 2012 9:04am
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Original Post was last edited: 2nd May 2012 9:06am
MJ says...
Wow Amanda. I hadn't seen him before and I've been looking on gumtree. Might email him about his mangos.

Mary, I've got my ficuses in 50cm square terracotta pots and there is no way I can move them. I've got them on feet so the removalists were able to get a trolley under. I was planning to start with 70cm wine barrels, and then to go up if needed to 1 metre pots for some of them. Pots that size are very expensive, though, so I was going to wait until (a) I find some that I love and (b) I can afford them and (c) the plants need a bigger pot. LOL at myself.

I did wonder, though, if I get my garden soil as good as I want it, by adding clay and compost, why I wouldn't use that (maybe adding some vermiculite or similar) in a pot. It seems that I could then just keep adding compost and manure and then only need to do anything when it needed root pruning (eventually, when it is in its final pot). Will ponder on that one. We do at least have room to tip them over and work.
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Perth
2nd May 2012 10:20am
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MaryT says...
MJ I have citrus in wine barrels; I can't move them. The ones I can move are plastic as in the pics; I bought them on eBay - 70cm round/square. They were $17/18 each.
Pictures - Click to enlarge

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Picture: 2
 
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MaryT
Sydney
2nd May 2012 2:20pm
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Julie says...
Mary, I have those terracotta coloured ones. Thinking of putting blueberries in them.
I picked up three pots like yours (the blue ones) from the annual rubbish clean-up. They were faded, but nothing wrong with them apart from that.
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Juie 1
Roleystone WA
2nd May 2012 8:40pm
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MaryT says...
ANNUAL clean up Julie? We have fortnightly cleanup here, and fortnightly pick up for green waste. The tip is a great place for pots as well.
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MaryT
Sydney
2nd May 2012 10:40pm
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MJ says...
We have weekly rubbish pickup and fortnightly recycling, depending on where you live. Then we have an additional bulk rubbish collection for items that won't fit, like old compost tumblers or tree prunings. In our area we have them twice a year and are always fascinated by what people will take.

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Perth
3rd May 2012 11:08am
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Julie says...
Mj, same here. I'M amazed at what people throw away - like a perfectly good tartan, thick woolen blanket!
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Juie 1
Roleystone WA
3rd May 2012 9:01pm
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Jim says...
Just a report on Bloomings. I got someone to pick up a white sapote (Lemon gold) for me whilst they were up that way. Very large (appx 10ft including pot) and healthy tree for the price ($68). Definitely cheaper than equivalent at other nurseries.
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Jim
Fremantle
3rd May 2012 9:49pm
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MJ says...
I'm heading out toward Bloomings tomorrow. If I get time I will pop in and have a look.

Julie, we got a really good (well, old and a bit sad, but we fixed it!) steel compost tumbler from the verge one year.
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4
Perth
3rd May 2012 10:33pm
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grub says...
heres some pictures of some mangoes grown in harvey wa the middle one is a nam doc mi there other 2 are bowens and the fruit on them are huge easy 1kg.they just had fruit of them and the doc is throwing flowers again .i did get a seed of the nam doc mi so we will seee how she goes ,next year im going to grapht some of the nam doc on to my other mangoes.they are 20 years old and the clay they are growing in is as hard as a rock,
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grub
dardanup
13th May 2012 9:31pm
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Original Post was last edited: 14th May 2012 7:10pm

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