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Transplanted Mango Tree

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Ember starts with ...
I planted this Mango Tree five days ago. It's been getting lots of water and as you can see I put up a partial shade house for it a few days ago. I've also given it a little SuperThrive to help with transplant shock. I live in Kihei, Maui where it's very hot and dry but planted another Mango Tree a few months ago without any problems. My question is, is this tree still alive? What else can I do to help it? Thank you!!
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Ember
Kihei
22nd July 2017 7:54pm
#UserID: 16563
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Original Post was last edited: 22nd July 2017 7:56pm
Manfred says...
Not enough information. What sort of plant was it. Was it in a pot or is it a recent layered propagule? (Anything else and it almost certainly won't survive.)

If it had a poor root system or the root system was exposed or reduced during planting it is always better to reduce the transpiration surfaces (leaves) at planting. In the condition in the photo I would be removing all the mature leaves and about two-thirds of the laminae (leaf surfaces) of the younger leaves. Leave the tips if they are still tender, but if they have dried out too, cut the whole thing down to just above the best leaves on each branch.

Still reduce the leaf area. Do it by cutting the leaf off and leaving the leaf stem (petiole). Don't rub the old dead leaves off, because there is a bud called an axillary bud in the crook of each petiole. If you get a good strike from these, let them grow for a season before you reshape the tree by cutting off the spare shoots.
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Manfred
Wamboin
24th July 2017 8:33pm
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Ember says...
Thank you for responding. It is a two year old golden glow Mango tree that was grown from a seed in a pot. I'm attaching a photo of what it looked like before planting. I'm also attaching a photo of the area where the leaves attach to the branch. The branches are still green. Also the little branch at the base of the tree seems healthy. I will admit I am really sad and worried about the tree but I had a bread fruit tree that I planted from a pot that looked bad for a month and now is doing great. Photo attached. How much should I be watering this tree? Is it possible to over water? It's very hot and dry here.
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Ember
Kihei
25th July 2017 8:46am
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Markmelb says...
Your breadfruit looks great - but dont flood it. mangos are quite bullet proof - theres a root issue with the seedling since your in Hawaii suggest you get a new grafted replacement to save time - should be lots where you are and good waves too.
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Markmelb
MOUNT WAVERLEY,3149,VIC
25th July 2017 8:40pm
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Ember says...
Thanks! I do have a grafted Mango tree that's doing well. What I don't understand is why it has a "e;root issue"e; now when it didn't have one in its pot. I was careful not to damage the roots when I planted it. 🤔
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Ember
Kihei
27th July 2017 4:43pm
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Manfred says...
In hot dry weather exposing the roots can cause the plant to lose too many of the fine new roots before they can re-establish. Fertilising a week or two before replanting and watering just before planting can help, and no fertiliser until it rehydrates is the rule when there's any doubt.

With tiny seedlings it's a bit different. Firstly, you are more careful to ensure all the roots get lifted and replanted, and secondly, they are generally well hydrated and planted in a tenderer more actively growing state.

Your superthrive is not the wrong thing to do, but not necessarily the right thing either. You just need to be confident that the osmotic pressure draws moisture from the soil to the plant and not the other way around. Too much dissolved nutrient in the soil and not enough in the plant makes it impossible for the plant to draw in water.

The plant's roots need to be in intimate contact with soil moisture at a lower level of nutrient than that within the plant, so build up the plant's reserves before you replant, not after.

(I just did a seedling avocado this week - same deal - given to me just dug out of the ground, wilting badly, but it picked up within an hour after I cut most of the leaves at the petiole, leaving more at the youngest leaves and all of the tip. The cool moist weather we've been having sure helped, but after only a day I have given it a liquid feed and it's looking great.)


(Trikus uses seasol which zhe keeps in a sink outdoors, to soak all seedlings' roots well before disturbing them, potting or repotting. It seems to work well for hir. )
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Manfred
Wamboin
28th July 2017 12:17pm
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Original Post was last edited: 28th July 2017 12:24pm

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