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Very narrow leaves on new citrus growth

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Gk starts with ...
Hi there, I have a lemon, orange and mandarin which all have extremely narrow and curled new growth as seen in the photo. I have applied a large range of fertilisers (without over fertilising) and apply plant/seaweed regularly. I tested the soil about a month ago and found it was nitrogen deficient, so put some urea on, but it hasn’t made a huge difference as yet. I’m out of ideas what is causing this - would appreciate any help!?
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Gk
Seven Hills
13th December 2017 9:24am
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Julie says...
Have a look at this site:

www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/agriculture/horticulture/citrus

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Julie
Roleystone WA
14th December 2017 5:27pm
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Fruitylicious1 says...
I'm pretty sure you have already eliminated the usual suspects that can cause leaf curl and narrow leaves like the sap sucking insects; aphids, mites and psyllids and leaf miner which tunnels through the leaf tissue given the assiduousness of your search for a cure. Another interesting line of inquiry is zinc and magnesium deficiency. This problem can be easily corrected by making a potent brew made of 1 cup seaweed concentrate , 1/2 a cup of fish emulsion , 3 teaspoon of zinc sulphate, and 3 teaspoon of Epsom salt all dissolved in 10 liters of water. It would be preferable to use weaker solution. Just dilute one part of the potent mixture to 10 part h2o. The diluted mixture can be sprayed over and under the leaves when the temperature is under 30c . Can also be used in other leafy veggies.
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Fruitylicious1
TAMWORTH,2340,NSW
15th December 2017 1:24pm
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Original Post was last edited: 15th December 2017 1:29pm
Gk says...
Hey guys, thanks for the feedback. I emailed the photo to Yates who asked a citrus grower, turns out the problem is likely glyphosate poisoning - either from drift or using an old sprayer which was not cleaned properly. I can’t recall when this would have occurred but I do use glyphosate to control weeds/turf nearby so could easily be the culprit.I have used every fertiliser under the sun so ruled out mineral deficiency - anyway, great to get some closure!

Thanks

Greg
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Gk
Seven Hills
15th December 2017 5:49pm
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Julie says...


From the site: Zinc (Zn)

Zinc deficiency, described as ‘little leaf’, ‘mottle leaf’ and ‘rosetting’, is one of the most damaging and widespread nutritional disorders of citrus. Leaf analyses conducted by NSW Agriculture have shown that over 60% of citrus orchards are low in zinc. The deficiency is most acute in alkaline soils. It also affects citrus growing on acid coastal soils.

Even in its earliest stages, zinc deficiency lowers yield, reduces tree vigour and makes fruit small and poor in quality. Leaf symptoms include small, narrow leaves (little leaf) and whitish-yellow areas between the veins (mottle leaf). Leaves also crowd along short stems (rosetting), and smaller twigs die back. Symptoms are often more pronounced on the northern (sunny) side of the tree.
Zinc deficiency 1

Zinc deficiency produces a bright creamy-yellow mottle. Leaves remain small and narrow (‘little leaf’) and stems are short, giving growth a bunched appearance. Symptoms are usually worse on the northern (sunny) side of the tree.
Zinc deficiency 2

Zinc deficiency is usually most severe in the spring growth. Note that leaves from the previous summer flush are not affected..
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Julie
Roleystone WA
15th December 2017 7:30pm
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Gk says...
Thanks Julie, yes i thought for awhile it was zinc deficiency but I applied zinc and Manganese chelate feed 3 times but didn't make any difference unfortunately!
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Gk
Seven Hills
18th December 2017 9:32am
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