Testimonials Shop News Specials Catalogue Contact Forum Blog My Account My Edibles
50 percent off when you pre order
50 percent off when you pre orderAdvanced TreesNative MT buy 3 get 1 FREEPlants that we have too many of and that will soon outgrow their pot size so need to be sold fast
Forum Rules | Updates

<< Back to Daleys Fruit Tree Forum

Satsuma plum tree

    45 responses

Kath Kermode starts with ...
The Japanese varieties of plums can take 3-5 years to develop their flowering spurs, especially in the subtropics. It looks like it has been growing nicely for you.
About the Author
Kath
Cawongla
21st June 2007 1:31pm
#UserID: 2
Posts: 363
View All Kath's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Brian Hipper says...
Thanks for that info Kath. The tree certainly looks healthy and vigorous and is covered in new buds - but whether leaf or flower we'll just have to wait and see.
About the Author

Blackbutt
29th June 2007 6:33am
#UserID: 1
Posts:
View All 's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
jeanne says...
I grew up in so.cal and my mother had a fabulous satsuma plum tree.

I would really like to grow one here. Haven/t seen any for sale at home depot or lowes.

Any feedback would be appreciated.
About the Author
jeanne
houston,tx
14th July 2007 9:05am
#UserID: 163
Posts: 1
View All jeanne's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Brian says...
Hi Jeanne, have a look at this website. You may find some useful information,
About the Author
Brian1
Blackbutt, QLD, Australia
14th July 2007 12:31pm
#UserID: 16
Posts: 2
View All Brian1's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Brian says...
Silly me! Here it is . . .
http://www.garden.org/foodguide/browse/fruit/plum/1398
About the Author
Brian1
Blackbutt, QLD, Australia
14th July 2007 12:32pm
#UserID: 16
Posts: 2
View All Brian1's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Bill says...
I also grew up in So. Calif. with neighbor who had a wonderful Satsuma that was loaded with fruit every summer. I got one last March from Lowes but it never budded out when weather warmed up! BUT - will try again this coming Spring.
About the Author
Bill
St. Helens, Ore
14th November 2007 9:05am
#UserID: 426
Posts: 2
View All Bill's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Rev says...
has anyone grown satsumas from seed?

i know they are a complex hybrid themsleves but its the best ever plum
firm n spicy
and i never see them in the shops anymore

id be willing to wait for a seedling to bear satsuma like fruit

would someone do me a favour and crack open some stones this season and tell me if they have properly formed pits?
About the Author
RevNQ1
Tabulam
19th November 2007 1:04am
#UserID: 441
Posts: 31
View All RevNQ1's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Anonymous says...
I bought one recently at Armststrongs. It's budding up now. However am not sure if their wil be fruit as it isn't self pollinating???? Maybe the bees will help as I do have alot of them
Let me know how yhou make out.

Joanne
About the Author

 
31st December 2007 9:01am
#UserID: 0
Posts:
View All 's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | Edit | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Rev says...
i was under impression they ARE self pollinating at least partially

id love to grow progeny

but all so called blood plums ive tried are weak as piss soft pale flesh plums

what others have firm meat?????
About the Author
RevNQ1
Tabulam
1st January 2008 1:37am
#UserID: 441
Posts: 31
View All RevNQ1's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Bill says...
Hi Rev.... Satsuma's require a polinator, and it is usually the Santa Rosa plum. Lowes and HDepot often have both or one grafted with both varieties on sale in the Spring... but my experience is that these often are too dried out and are dead by the time you get them in the ground. Satsuma's are definately not mushy... and in my humble opinion, the best plums around.
About the Author
Bill
Oregon
2nd January 2008 2:17am
#UserID: 426
Posts: 2
View All Bill's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Brian says...
After starting this whole discussion six months ago with a photo and a question as to how soon satsumas produce fruit, I am pleased to say that at this time we do have fruit. They are not quite ready yet but the possums seem to think they are alright as they have taken three and a half plums. My wife ate the other half and said that it was delicious with nice, dark red flesh. I'd like to point out that the satsuma is the only plum tree we have - so unless there is another tree in the neighborhood, a pollinator doesn't seem to be required.
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1
  
About the Author
Brian5
Australia
2nd January 2008 3:41pm
#UserID: 533
Posts: 5
View All Brian5's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Anonymous says...
brian could you please humour me and chill any pits you get in the fridge a few months
and chuck them in a pot

or even send them my way

im keen to know if these complex hybrids make viable seed
About the Author

 
3rd January 2008 8:25am
#UserID: 0
Posts:
View All 's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | Edit | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Brian says...
It will be an interesting experiment Anonymous as the tree appears to be grafted. I will enjoy scoffing the remaining plums and popping the pits in the fridge.

Brian
About the Author
Brian5
Australia
3rd January 2008 10:28am
#UserID: 533
Posts: 5
View All Brian5's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
rev says...
that was me

enjoy

i have such fond memories as akid of scoffing tree ripened satsumas in fly free south Australia
About the Author
RevNQ1
tabulam
3rd January 2008 11:11am
#UserID: 441
Posts: 31
View All RevNQ1's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Ray says...
I was browsing at Lowe's and came across a Satsuma plum bare root. It's going in the ground today! I haven't tasted a Satsuma in over 35 years.
About the Author

Placentia, CA
9th February 2008 6:16am
#UserID: 0
Posts:
View All 's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | Edit | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
John says...
Hay Ray dont for get to trim it by a thrid or you will have to do it next year and add 2 years before fruiting. Goodluck
About the Author
John10
SB South Australia
9th February 2008 7:40am
#UserID: 549
Posts: 127
View All John10's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Alice says...
A big Satsuma tree was in our yard when we bought the house and property in 1963. We get a tree full of these great delicious plums every year. We eat them fresh, then I make pints and pints of the best plum jam you ever tasted. Everybody says this jam is the best they have ever tasted. After my husband died, the boys have not trimmed the tree at the proper time. It has long whips on it, and has already begun to bud, so I think it is too late to trim it now. I think it should have been done in January, but not sure. Does anybody know when is the right time to trim the tree back? One son said he has already trimmed some long whips recently; I think the tree will produce less fruit because of that late trim. I can't seem to find the right information on the right time and how to prune a Satsuma plum tree, at least not on Google online. anybody know? Alice
About the Author
Alice
So. California
10th March 2008 2:03pm
#UserID: 756
Posts: 1
View All Alice's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
aNON says...
Looks pretty dry, some water would help.

(if you got any !).+
About the Author
aNON
 
10th March 2008 4:09pm
#UserID: 700
Posts: 194
View All aNON's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Brian says...
Hi Alice, I recently needed to find out when to prune fruit trees and found that Winter seems to be the accepted time for pruning most stone fruit.

Like you, we once purchased a property with a large satsuma plum tree growing and can agree with you that they are the most delicious plums on earth.
About the Author
Brian5
Blackbutt, Queensland, Australia
11th March 2008 9:46am
#UserID: 533
Posts: 5
View All Brian5's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Brian says...
Hi again Alice, I forgot to add the paragraph on pruning plum trees . . . .


Winter is the best time to prune deciduous fruit trees such as apples, pears and plums. These trees will fruit well whether or not they are pruned. But if the trees grow too tall the fruit is high and hard to reach, and when there is unproductive wood they don't tend to crop reliably. The aim of pruning fruit trees in the home garden is to assist the tree to produce reliable quality crops, with good size fruit on a manageable size tree.

Cheers and good luck,
Brian.
About the Author
Brian5
Blackbutt, Queensland, Australia
11th March 2008 9:51am
#UserID: 533
Posts: 5
View All Brian5's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Itdepends says...
You can see my plums in the left of this pic- one is a santa rosa for pollination and the other a mariposa blood plum. I planted them just after the house was built- this is their 5th growing season since planting.

Love the flavour- so much so that I've planted another blood plum (ruby blood) in the garden this year (just behind where I was standing to take the picture)
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1
  
About the Author
Itdepends2
WA
19th April 2008 6:47pm
#UserID: 884
Posts: 41
View All Itdepends2's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Ron says...
I have also been searching for information about pruning Satsumas.
We had one already on the property when we bought it.
Our problem is that, after pruning, it keeps shooting new canes (is that what they are called) that are way too long.
Is there a technique to prune them so that they don't get the long single stems?
About the Author
Ron3
South Australia
9th July 2008 12:54pm
#UserID: 1145
Posts: 1
View All Ron3's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
John says...
Tie the canes down to horizontal.
About the Author
John20
Perth
9th July 2008 5:51pm
#UserID: 1094
Posts: 287
View All John20's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Brian says...
Hi Rev,
I just thought I'd let you know that after a few weeks in the fridge, the Satsuma plum stone was put into a pot and is now a good looking seedling about 4 inches tall. As to whether it will eventually bear fruit, we'll just have to wait and see.

Season's greetings to you and yours.
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1
  
About the Author
Brian5
 
24th December 2008 9:32am
#UserID: 533
Posts: 5
View All Brian5's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Jeanne says...
Looking for pruning info for my satsuma plum and came accross info online taht said not to prune plums until June. Am I the only one that finds that a little weird? I thought I should trim it when I prune my peach. Any info would be appreciated.
About the Author

Houston,Texas
22nd January 2009 10:20am
#UserID: 0
Posts:
View All 's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | Edit | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Phil. says...
Yes winter pruning can leave stone fruit trees open to disease as the plant is unable to heal until the sap starts flowing. A good time to prune is after harvest and the tree can recover in time before it becomes dormant again.
About the Author

Carlsruhe, Vic
22nd January 2009 10:40am
#UserID: 0
Posts:
View All 's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | Edit | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Julie says...
You should always seal pruning cuts. There is a special paint called Steriprune, but a local orchardist I know just uses any old acrylic paint - as long as the cuts are sealed. He looks for half-tins of paint at the tip!

Large cuts are made in winter, but there has been a trend to more summer pruning in the last few years - it produces less unwanted growth.
About the Author
Julie
Roleystone
14th February 2009 5:47pm
#UserID: 154
Posts: 1723
View All Julie's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
jim says...
i have a satsuma plum tree that i planted in may of this year 2009 it is now the middle of sept it has not grown an inch nore has it any new growth at all its leave seem to be drying up and falling offis it dying or in a state of shock i bought the tree at lowes they also told me it was self pollanating in need of some info please thank you so much jim
About the Author
Jim1
san bernardino ca
21st September 2009 1:05am
#UserID: 2811
Posts: 3
View All Jim1's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Itdepends says...
Jim it's getting cold up there (autumn coming on in the Northern hemisphere)- so the tree is just going dormant for winter (all the leaves dry up and drop off).

Cheers,

Daniel
About the Author

 
21st September 2009 3:03pm
#UserID: 0
Posts:
View All 's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | Edit | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
JIM says...
THANK YOU SO MUCH DANIEL
About the Author

SAN BERNARDINO CA
22nd September 2009 6:39am
#UserID: 0
Posts:
View All 's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | Edit | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Itdepends says...
No worries.

P.S.- although Satsuma is partially self pollinating you will get heavier crops with a cross pollinator. Santa Rosa is a good pollinator for most Japanese plums. No need to buy another one though- if you can find someone with one (or another suitable pollinator) it's easy enough to graft a bit on to your existing tree in late winter.

Daniel
About the Author

 
23rd September 2009 1:26pm
#UserID: 0
Posts:
View All 's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | Edit | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Jo says...
I planted a satsuma plum approx 8 weeks ago ( august) It has lots of green folliage but no blossom , is this normal...I am a first time fruit tree planter.
I also planted a stella cherry which is looking a little sorry for itself, with only a few gren leaves coming out,and a pear tree which is similar to the plum with lots of green folliage...can anyone tell me if I need to plant others for pollinating forgot all about the fruit law
Thanks Jo
About the Author
Jo14
adelaide
21st October 2009 8:58pm
#UserID: 2925
Posts: 1
View All Jo14's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Jason says...
Cherry and Pear I dont know. (Dont think so). Plums yes.

Ive just bought a Satsuma and Blood Red.
Ill check the flowers on the satsuma as its young and just planted also.
About the Author
Jason1
Perth
21st October 2009 9:08pm
#UserID: 2491
Posts: 111
View All Jason1's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Jason says...
Oops just went to check, didnt get either of them right. Ruby Blood and Santa Rosa.

But no flowers on Santa Rosa. A few small ones on Ruby Blood.
About the Author
Jason1
Perth
21st October 2009 9:24pm
#UserID: 2491
Posts: 111
View All Jason1's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Itdepends says...
Plum trees take 3-5 years to start bearing fruit. You won't get many flowers the first few years. If it goes well- you might get 1-2 fruit the second growing season- increasing from there. You may want to take the first fruit off to get the tree to put more energy into growth- but if you're like me- you'll be dying for a taste.

Mine didn't start fruiting heavily until they had been in the ground for 5 years.

Cheers,

Daniel
About the Author

 
22nd October 2009 3:36pm
#UserID: 0
Posts:
View All 's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | Edit | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
GardenerGeorge says...
Brian .... We have inherited aged neglected stone fruit woody trees in Southern Western Victoria .... I assume that I prune in Winter especially all the old mossy wood ... Your advice with respect to fertilisers etc to re-invigorate these trees please ... George ... Tks ..
About the Author
GardenerGeorge
Birregurra Victoria
7th February 2010 2:04pm
#UserID: 3353
Posts: 1
View All GardenerGeorge's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
amanda says...
Pruning Japanese Plums: (from Diggers club) "Japanese plums carry their fruit on one yr old wood, much like peaches and nectarines. They are very vigorous trees and are best summer pruned with the leading shoots cut back to about a quarter of their length, leaving the sie shoots that will bear the fruit unpruned. These side shoots can be pruned out after 2 yrs"

I did this with mine (satsuma, gulf ruby etc) and got a bumper crop (see pic) had to thin! (pic of this seasons)
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1
  
About the Author
amanda19
Geraldton. WA
11th February 2010 8:26pm
#UserID: 2309
Posts: 4607
View All amanda19's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Damo says...
Manda, only one word for you..thin !!
About the Author
Damo
 
13th February 2010 2:03am
#UserID: 2803
Posts: 77
View All Damo's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Ragtime Willie says...
termites got my sat plum n alb peach just like they got Rick and Richard RIP gonna have to plant a new one. Will give some to Mr Dylan when he comes by the gallery
About the Author
Ragtime Willie
 
30th July 2010 10:35am
#UserID: 3998
Posts: 1
View All Ragtime Willie's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Jo says...
I have flowers this year fingers crossed I get some fruit. We live in an area that is approx 30 years old so hoping that someone has a pollinating plum tree around here !!tree has been in about 18 months
About the Author

 
26th September 2010 10:45pm
#UserID: 0
Posts:
View All 's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | Edit | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Itdepends says...
Don't be disappointed if you don't get any Jo- they take 3-4 years before they really hit their stride.
About the Author

 
27th September 2010 8:24pm
#UserID: 0
Posts:
View All 's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | Edit | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Ili says...
Hi,

I also have newly planted plums a Santa Rosa and Mariposa, they went in last winter (2010). I cut them back by a third as I had been advised. They were not looking great this summer so I started to pay them some attention. Some food and more water. I'm using dynamic lifter for fruit & citrus. They are looking much more spirited now.

Originally I had been told winter pruning but have since read and heard from more knowledgable and reputable sources that confirm what amanda says. Late summer being the best time, allowing the fruit tree to heal prior to winter dormancy. Early Autumn the latest. In winter there is no sap flowing through the tree to heal the wounds from the cuts as there is at the end of summer. Another important tip I read was to wipe the shears with a disinfectant between all cuts.

Just been reading about the green gage - sounds delicious which is terrible as I already bought too many fruit trees last year.

Good luck all!
About the Author
Ili
Meadows by the bay
3rd February 2011 10:18am
#UserID: 3156
Posts: 5
View All Ili's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Ili says...
Also most cherries and pear do need a pollinator. Flemings has info on pollinators. I'm not experienced enough to know how correct this is. Louis Glowinski's 'the complete book of growing fruit in Australia' says williams are self-fertile while flemings say no. Stella is one cherry that is self fertile. Santa rosa is partially self fertile, do will do much better with a pollinator.
So many plums, pears, apples, cherries need pollinators while nectarines, peaches and apricot seem not to.
About the Author
Ili
Meadows by the bay
3rd February 2011 10:23am
#UserID: 3156
Posts: 5
View All Ili's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Itdepends says...
Yes- but if you can get grafting material- the stonefruit aren't that hard to graft onto - getting aroudn the pollination issue.

BTW- your fruit and citrus fertilizer is probably higher in nitrogen than you'd need for a plum tree- simple NPK blue or similar would be fine.
About the Author

 
3rd February 2011 11:53pm
#UserID: 0
Posts:
View All 's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | Edit | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
blazeaglory says...
Just put a nice 3 in 1 Plum Tree(Santa Rosa, Satsuma, Italian Prune)in the ground. The tree was bare root and a good 7 feet tall! It is showing signs of vigorous growth with all 3 types starting to produce nice green leaves. I hope I will get some flowers.

I know the Italian Plum (or prune) is a high chill hour and that the other two types of plums are good until zone 9. Its funny but I am in zone 10 and I know of several Satsuma and Santa Rosa in my neighborhood that fruit heavy every year. So Im hoping mine will also. My red baron fruited the same year I put it in the ground and made the most tasty of peaches and this tree has the same chill requirements as the 2 of 3 plums. Fingers crossed Im glad I found this site!

Also got a nice big clementine mandarine orange tree from home depot. Oh BTW, I only paid $8 for the 3 in 1 plum at the home depot on beach and katella. They have TONS of bare root fruit trees HALF OFF!
About the Author
blazeaglory
Central Orange County CA
5th March 2012 2:15pm
#UserID: 6654
Posts: 2
View All blazeaglory's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Original Post was last edited: 5th March 2012 2:30pm
Kizza says...
I have been picking bagfuls of fruit from a delicious Ruby blood plum this weekend. Magnificent fruiter - does anyone have any tips on how to take a graft? Do I need rootstock?
About the Author
Kizza
Melbourne
10th April 2012 10:50pm
#UserID: 6841
Posts: 1
View All Kizza's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)

REPLY to this forum

Email: Password:
display Name: Suburb:  
Pictures: Add Another Picture
Body:
 
Remember to include a picture if possible

<< Back to Daleys Fruit Tree Forum