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Transplanting Older Citrus Trees

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Thea starts with ...
Hi
I have two citrus trees - one lemon and one Mandarin that my late father gave me. They have been in my garden for about 8 years and did not grow for most of those but over the last year they have shot up quite a lot. The Mandarin tree is about 10ft and the lemon tree about 6ft. My problem is that I need to move home quite quickly and would like to take them to my new home and I am not sure whether they would survive. How could I transplant them giving them the best chance of survival?
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Thea
Adelaide
21st April 2008 4:31pm
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Tony says...
There is an excellent book on Citrus by Alan Gilbert that explains in detail how to transplant an older citrus tree. The book is called "Citrus A Guide to Organic Management, Propagation, Pruning, Pest Control and Harvesting".
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Tony9
Warrnambool
26th April 2008 9:23am
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Thea says...
Many thanks for this info.
Cheers
Thea
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Thea
Adelaide
5th May 2008 3:10pm
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Anonymous says...
Hi Thea,

If you have any trouble getting hold of this book send me an email and I will photocopy the relevant part and send it to you.

regards, Tony Brown
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13th May 2008 3:44pm
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michael says...
I've just moved a mandarin tree within my garden, i've dug approx 15cm around the trunk and re-planted it immediately in the same garden (essentially, it was planted in a bad spot, so I've moved it).
I'm from melbourne.
Since moving the tree the leaves are now pretty yellow, I think its not going to survive....what can I do to keep it alive.
Its approx 1 metre high, not sure on age (but estimate at least 8 years).
I didnt put water in the hole which i dug for the replant (approx 40cm deep, but did ensure soil was fairly moist).
I'm now watering it every day, but no idea what else I can do.
any help would be great.
Michael
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michael8
melbourne
5th October 2008 6:43pm
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Mark says...
Hi Michael,
I'm no expert but if it helps here is what I would do. Firstly I think I'd prune it back. You've almost certainly lost some roots so that should make it easier for the left over roots to support the rest of the tree. Secondly consider applying an appropriate fertilizer that encourages root growth. Finally, be careful with the watering, perhaps keep an eye on the moisture content of the soil to so as to ensure you don't overwater it with kindness. Root rot is a killer. Use mulch to help the soil retain water instead of watering everyday. Good luck!
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Brisbane
6th October 2008 2:52pm
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Karina says...
Hi John, just wondering if I could bother you for those photocopies - I have a similar problem & can't find that book. Thanks
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Karina3
Sydney
9th December 2009 11:00am
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Peter says...
Thanks Tony,
I have two large i.e. 6 meter citrus trees to relocate in the garden. So I need the book "Citrus A Guide to Organic Management, Propagation, Pruning, Pest Control and Harvesting"? maybe the author should be on the forum...any other suggestions...thanks mate; peter
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Peter21
Mullumbimby
25th March 2010 9:45pm
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John Mc says...
Hey Peter,
I'm a fan of not pruning the branches back when moving large trees. I think the tree reasimilates the food and nutrients in the leaves untill the roots recover. It will drop a lot of leaves in the process but you will notice that the droppped leaves have had all the nutrients sucked out of them before falling.
I've successfully moved several large trees over the past year with 100% success rate.
The tree will have a better chance of survival if you can move it over the cooler months. You can do more for even better success, but,I'd have to write a small novel going through everything.
Here's a pic of a large mango tree I moved a month ago. As you can see it's picked up very well. One of the pic's shows how many leaves it lost while recovering.
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John Mc
 
31st March 2010 4:14pm
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Lukea777 says...
Hi John if there was any chance you could also email me that section of the book for transplanting the older tree that would be wonderful.
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Lukea777
Cooranbong
27th April 2010 9:04am
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John Mc says...
Hey Lukea777,

I moved a large Custard apple (Atemoya)from Cooranbong about three weeks ago. There's also two large Persimmon trees I'm contemplating on removing from there as well. I took pics of the move and upped them onto this very site. Small world I guess.
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John Mc
 
27th April 2010 4:31pm
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julia says...
HI Tony,

I need to move an old lemon tree -over 20 years old... I would very mach appreciate if I could get hold of the information regarding replanting citrus.
Any chance you could scan the info and send it via email?
much apreciated.
Julia
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julia4
perth Australia
5th July 2010 1:39pm
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amanda says...
Hey John Mc - u haven't moved citrus by any chance have u?

(Your thoughts about not pruning are really interesting and got me thinking about the loss of precious moisture thru the many pruning wounds also?)

My citrus are a bit big for the 35L tree bags i think - and the drive to future new location 7hrs... I am wondering if it's worth the hassle and if they would survive the trip.
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
27th July 2010 8:30pm
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Angie says...
I am clearing a house block to rebuild and have several fruit trees which my sister would like to move to her farm in Lorn (40 mins away). Thankfully they have a truck.

There's an olive, lime, orange, grapefruit and lilipilly tree. They're all approx 9yrs old and fruiting well.

Can anyone please advise the most successful method of moving these tree?
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Angie1
Merewether, NSW
2nd August 2010 11:28am
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James says...
Hi Tony

I now need to move three 8 foot citrus trees, I was wondering if you could possibly email me the pages of the book mentioned in this forum outlining the best practice.
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James14
Mandurah, WA
24th September 2010 12:18pm
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amanda says...
Hi James - Tony has not been around for awhile...
For what it's worth - citrus have shallow roots - but also some deep roots. Some of the best people to ask about these things are arborists etc. I have seen quite large olive trees being re-planted in Perth - the main thing I noticed was the very serious anchoring/staking of the trees - very professional job. And Olives have a tap root.

If u have nothing to lose with the trees - then it's really about how much u can afford to spend perhaps? If u can afford a back hoe etc - then you can dig up more of the root system etc.
Professionals can do the job 4 U also.

Do it very soon though - it will be too hot b4 long...

They will need special care to get thru a WA summer.

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amanda19
Geraldton Mid West WA
24th September 2010 9:49pm
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Yvonne says...
Hi I have enclosed pictures of an orange and mandarin tree we would like to relocate to another position in our garden. We believe the trees are approx about 20yrs old and would be devastated to lose them as they produce beautiful fruit. We have a bob cat coming to help dig them out and wonder and pray we are doing the right thing to keep these trees alive. I would love a copy of those pages you have to transplant the trees if you could email me to them I would be very grateful.
Kindest regards Yvonne
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Yvonne
South Australia
10th October 2010 1:31pm
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Wayne says...
A major job coming up there Yvonne, I doubt that a Bobcat could handle it. I trust the one you have organised has a backhoe attachment because it is needed. The trees are also very close to the fence so be aware that the tree roots are under it.

To remove those trees with enough root ball for them to survive you would be looking at possibly a tonne each in weight , much more than a bobcat can handle

Just the same, you can only try because such beautiful trees certainly need to be kept.
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Wayne
Mackay QLD
10th October 2010 6:23pm
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John Mc says...
I moved this Meyer lemon about 6 weeks ago. Still looking good. Plenty of Seasol around the roots and over the leaves. I kept the leaves wet with seasol twice a day for a fortnight.
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JohnMc1
 
10th October 2010 6:50pm
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Brendan says...
Nice job John Mc, but, can I ask you to please move the mulch away from the tree trunk? :-) I wouldn't want your Meyer lemon tree to get collar rot or scalely butt etc.

To simplify this process, I use these $10 plastic rings from bunnies :-) See photo of my 1 year old Lamb Hass avocado, with 'mulch ring' :-)
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
11th October 2010 8:10am
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John Mc says...
Yes mate It looks deceiving, the trunk is clear. I've seen those mulch rings at Bunnens but at $8ea, I'll take my chances, good idea though. I threw the lawn clippings around it in a hurry the other day and haven't got around to spreading it around properly as yet. Is that a phytophthora resistant Hass, Brendan? Mine is performing well ahead of the other varieties.
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JohnMc1
 
11th October 2010 10:09am
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Original Post was last edited: 11th October 2010 2:31pm
Brad says...
well done John - not even yellowing of the leaf to be seen. did it drop any?
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Brad2
leaving Como, Perth this week
11th October 2010 12:21pm
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John Mc says...
Yes, it dropped probably 1/4 of its leaves. I was a bit cheeky and left a lot of fruit on the tree untill recently. I thought I might have been stretching the limits there so I pulled them all (nearly) a couple of weeks ago. It's putting out heaps of flowers atm, I should pull all of them off to give the poor thing a chance to get settled. Otherwise, it's doing OK.

Somewhere here on the forum you will find a large custard apple tree I moved just before winter. It went into shock and dropped everything. I now see signs of revival after a long dormant winter.
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JohnMc1
 
11th October 2010 2:27pm
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amanda says...
John Mc - that's pretty impressive! It looks big too - out of interest - how tall is it?
Did it have much of a tap root?
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amanda19
Geraldton Mid West WA
11th October 2010 6:38pm
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John Mc says...
Hi Amanda,
The tree stands about 2.5m tall. I dug it out of a vege garden where an old guy threatened to cut it down while I was there doing a job for him. There was no deep tap root, only large shallow side roots. All this with only a plumbers shovel and crow bar. I wedged it onto a heavy tarp and skull dragged it to and up on the trailer.
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JohnMc1
 
11th October 2010 8:17pm
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amanda says...
Good on u John Mc! I always find your 'transplant' posts inspiring - I may dig my West Indian lime to take too now :) It's only 1.5m tall/4yrs old and is one of my fave's.
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amanda19
Geraldton Mid West WA
12th October 2010 1:25pm
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BJ says...
I transplanted a 3m native frangipani on the weekend. I realised it would become too large for my yard and moved it to my father's acreage. I am not expecting the results to be as good as yours, John Mc, but its such a lovely tree that it would have pained me not to have at least tried... I have a small reason for optimism, as I moved a 1.8m flame tree to my mother's house recently, and it is going fantastically!
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The poster formerly known as...
Brisbane
12th October 2010 1:43pm
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Yvonne says...
Thanks for the info Wayne took your advice about getting a backhoe im going to get the backhoe to dig around the circle concrete ring bottom of trees do you think i will have enough ball roots for it to survive making a start this saturday thanks again
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Yvonne
South Australia
19th October 2010 1:28pm
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Wayne says...
I think so Yvonne, and follow John Mc's instructons about getting them started.

All the very best luck to you
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Wayne
Mackay QLD
19th October 2010 4:29pm
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Chris Hutch says...
Hi all,
I'm in the process of buying a house where I live in the south of Italy. The back yard needs re-organising : I'd especially like to move a couple of lemon trees that look to be approx. 20 years old. Reading all the posts I see repeated references to the Alan Gilbert book. Could anyone please take pity on me and send a copy of the relevant section that would help me? Thanks in advance to anyone who goes to the trouble! Chris.
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Chris Hutch
 
4th February 2011 9:21pm
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Amanda5 says...
hello,
It is great to read in this forum about the success people are having moving their tress.
I am also planning to move an old lemon tree (approx 2 meters high, age unknown) to a more appropriate spot in the garden. I would love to read the relevant section in the Alan Gilbert book. Could someone kindly email me a copy. Thanks. Amanda
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Amanda5
Melbourne
5th February 2011 9:18pm
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Susan M says...
Hi

Due to drainage issues with the house I am most likely going to have to chance moving a well established lemon tree that is a great producer. It is about 20 years old and 3 m high. At least we personally know an arborist who may be able to help.

If possible I would appreciate a copy of the relevant section of the Alan Gilbert book please. Our library system doesn't appear to have it.
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Susan M
Canberra
17th February 2011 11:05am
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Sue says...
Hi I want to move Lemon/Lime tree approx 2 metres high not sure of the age at least 8years old. We are rebuilding and the tree will be in the way. We live in Torquay in Victoria. If anyone has a copy of the relevant section of the Alan Gilbert book re transplanting could you please please email me a copy.. I was hoping to move the tree this May Many thanks in anticipation
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Sue22
Torquay Victoria
26th April 2011 11:58pm
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Sam says...
Hi, I have a lemon tree that I planted when I was in the 6th grade and I just graduated college. I would like to keep the lemon tree. Can someone send me the relevant section of Alan Gilbert's book also? Thanks!
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Sam9
Pasadena
15th May 2011 7:28am
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Greg says...
I would also like to have a look at the refrenced sections - we are going to have a go at moving a very old lemon tree and also an orange tree to make way for a retaining wall. The idea was to use a large excavator to first dig around the trees and then lift them into a new location. I as also thinking about giving the tree a decent prune with a chainsaw first to knock off old overgrown branches.

Any experiences out there with seriously big?

Cheers
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Greg17
Barossa Valley
30th May 2011 3:12pm
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Georgia says...
Dear Tony (or anyone else who has it)
Me too - please can you email me (georgiatrench@optusnet.com.au) the sections of the book on moving citrus? Thank you so much!
Georgia
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Georgia2
Brisbane
4th June 2011 6:49am
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till says...
Hi Tony
Can you email me a copy of the section on moving citrus trees also. (hill.tony@people.net.au)
Many thanks
Tony
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till
Brisbane
4th June 2011 10:52am
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kurt says...
hi all
we have an old orange and mandarin tree at an old house site that was burnt down years ago. but the trees are fine. i want to have a go at moving them. on the mandarin there are some suckers with big spikes. i guess they are from below the graft. if i cut them off can i stop them from growing again? also it has a lot of fruit at the moment. when should i move it?
if any one could please send me parts of that book and any advise would be much appreciated
kurt@thepeeles.com
cheers Kurt
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kurt
wodonga
5th June 2011 7:43am
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Original Post was last edited: 5th June 2011 7:47am
KathyW says...
Citrus, by Allan Gilbert
ISBN: 9781864471038

Available on eBay (Australia). Might ship international, they don't say.

We dug up and moved three over 10 year old citrus - a tahitian lime, myer lemon and orange - 4 or so years ago. Moved in the middle of summer during a drought (very bad but no option). Two of them, the orange and lemon, survived. Still struggling but starting to fruit again. Staking till they re-establish is essential. Ours went into much better soil, with much better airflow circulation, but no protection from strong winds.

Now I want to move a Kafir lime and small lemon - but at least it's winter now :-)
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KathyW
Albury, Australia
19th June 2011 12:44pm
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dean says...
Could someone please email me these parts of the book also. I have a orange tree that I would like to transplant ASAP and it appears from above that now is the time to do it. Greatly appreciated.
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dean3
Bendigo
10th July 2011 2:08pm
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Kyle W says...
Hi everyone
tomorrow I will be transplanting 6 mandarin trees from a commercial orchid to my flower orchid (something for the kids to nibble on). I was feeling rather confident but even more so now after reading everyones experiences and advice.
CHEEERS.
Fingers crosed.
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Ngataki, New Zealand
11th July 2011 8:15pm
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Mike says...
Kyle you may be committed to follow a plan at this late stage.I have seen other move quite large fruit trees of a number of species.Common practice is to trim the tree right back at least a week beforehand and cut the roots and it is optional whether to excavate around it at this stage but provide water.Roots will be predominantly close to the surface.On the day waterand take as much soil as possible.After planting erect shade and water well but be careful not to waterlog soil for long periods.Desiccation is the greatest hazard.
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Cairns
11th July 2011 9:03pm
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Mike says...
And another thing,use steriprune on all the cuts on the day.
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Cairns
11th July 2011 9:09pm
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Kyle W says...
Hi Mike
thanks for your advice. Trees have been pruned a few weeks ago and will be dug up by excavator to keep a large root ball. I also have a digger so handling will be kept to a minimum if all goes well.
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Ngataki New Zealand
12th July 2011 6:17am
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Flossy says...
All those ppl looking for that book - try you local public library! They will have that and many more. I am moving a small lemon tree about 2 meters in my garden. Want more room for the kids, previous owners had lots of fruit trees all over the place!
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Flossy
Perth
21st July 2011 1:35am
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Alex says...
Relocating a 3-4m mandarin tree, as the person who owns it wants to chop it down because it is blocking his rear yard access.
Can anyone who has the relevant pages, How to transplant an older citrus tree, from the book "Citrus A Guide to Organic Management, Propagation, Pruning, Pest Control and Harvesting" by Alan Gilbert.
Please e-mail them to me at fitzroyhouse@hotmail.com
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Alex7
Adelaide
23rd July 2011 9:36am
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S.O.P says...
Long term transplants are usually better odds of survival. Long term as the length of the process, as opposed to dig and move on the same day. If this applies to citrus, I don't know.

First, cut lengths on the point of the compass (NESW) with a sharp shovel, using a saw on anything of size that gets mashed. Back fill these trenches with a sandy loam. I would do this on the drip line or thereabouts (or whatever is manageable for the transplant hole).

Wait a couple of months during the active growing season, then cut again on the opposite of the points, so they join up in a circle with your original cuts. 4 cuts = total 180 degrees on compass points. 8 = 360 degrees.

Theory is, your original cuts will be 'root-pruned' and start growing new feeders at the location of the cuts. Then when you transplant, those feeders will be ready to go when you cut the other older roots and transplant. Remember, most trees have 90% of their roots in the top 150mm of soil, if you snap a tap root or any deeper, just tidy up with a sharp saw.

Consider your climate when you start the process (rain, heat and transpiration levels). Again, citrus may be different, particularly in cold climates. That's how I would transplant a tree. Follow up care is Seaweed, applied to roots and leaves and keep moist, not wet.
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SOP1
Brisbane
23rd July 2011 4:39pm
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Alex says...
Thanks for the info S.O.P.
Unfortunately I donít have the luxury of time as he wanted the tree gone asap.
I managed to dig the tree out yesterday and replant it.
I saved a good portion of the roots. I havenít cut the tree back at all.
Gave the tree a good soaking and just as I finished it started to rain, with showers from late afternoon yesterday, today and possible drizzle tomorrow.
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Alex8
Adelaide
24th July 2011 11:12am
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Laisla says...
Hi Alex,

I am in a similar predicament with a Mandarin tree the previous owners left in my backyard. It has become shaded by overhanging canopy and doesn't fruit very well as a result. I've decided to give it to someone who can give it a better aspect. How is your one surviving the transplant?
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7th August 2011 7:30am
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AS Al-Buainain says...
Hi everybody, I have a farm that has 200 lime trees that just started fruiting for the past three years, the age is about 8yrs and would like to relacomate them to my new farm. Any help, or could any body e-mail me the copies of the book "Citrus A Guide to Organic Management.

Many thanks, Adnan
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AS AlBuainain1
Saudi Arabia, Jubail
21st September 2011 1:48am
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Mani says...
I could not find the book(Alan Gilbert) on citrus trees in Bay Area California!!
Is it possible to bother you for scan and email of the portion for the old lemon tree transplant???
This is greatly appreciated.
manisigaroudi@comcast.net
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Mani
San Francisco California
12th October 2011 12:43pm
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Jimmy says...
you can buy it easily on-line.
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12th October 2011 3:39pm
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leilton says...
Have a mandarin tree given as a gift believe now two years old,only a small one.
Had a builder on site, who, although told to be careful, tried his best to destroy it, so I dug as large a hole as I could, filled it with water, dug the tree out, covered in clothe and watered it. Next day planted replanted thee tree.
Nothing untoward, until today (two weeks later), noticed leaves dropping, have I done any damage?
Hate to think so as couple who gave it me are a lovely Spanish pair.
Any info or help appreciated
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leilton
spain
17th October 2011 3:49am
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hogie says...
hi, can someone please email me the relevant sections of the book on transplanting older citrus? thanks much.
(earthangelhogie@hotmail.com)
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hogie
 
6th December 2011 7:33am
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Millermob says...
Hi we have just transplanted a 3m lemon tree that was about to be bulldozed. We have given lots of seasol on the roots before covering, also some soil activator. Then seasol again once planted, I was wondering if someone could please email me the relevant info as well, or let me know what else we should be doing to keep it alive. It was transported from the city to Rockingham, so a good 50km or more, and it is summer. Email me @ sgk078@hotmail.com
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Millermob
Perth
8th January 2012 7:28pm
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Brendan says...
Hi Millermob,
A big mistake people make when transplanting trees is they over water it.
What is 'soil activator'? I hope it's not the surfactant 'Activactor'?
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
11th January 2012 8:36am
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Millermob says...
Hi Brendan, the soil activator we used is the Naked Farmer brand, this is what it says on the website


Rich Source of Organic Carbon


Naked Farmer Soil Activator for†Organic Gardens†is extremely rich in Organic Carbon, Humic Acid and Fulvic Acid. It is perfect for constructing great quality soils and will improve the condition of the existing soil by stimulating biological growth, optimising the chemical composition and improving the physical structure.


The Soil Activator key benefits to your garden are...†

Brings your Soil to Life: For the past 20 years, gardeners have been told that plants require chemical fertilisers for strong growth. Soils have left to deteriorate due to the lack of organic matter being returned to the soil & in some cases have become lifeless. Soil Activator for Organic Gardens is extremely rich in Organic Carbon. Organic Carbon is a nutrient source for microbes & bacteria in the soil. Microbes are responsible for breaking down nutrients & making them available to plants to absorb through the root systems.

Stronger Healthier Plants: Growing trials have shown that plants have bigger root balls, thicker leaves & stems. Stronger plants are naturally more disease & pest resistant.

Breaks Down Clay Soils: Soil Activator for Organic Gardens contains humic & fulvic acids which will breakdown the clay chemically while the concentrated organic matter will keep the clay particles separated.

Builds up Sandy Soils: Soil Activator for Organic Gardens is concentrated organic matter that will add structure to sandy soils & assist in holding water & fertilisers.

Stops Fertilisers Leaching through the Soil: Soil Activator for Organic Gardens is negatively charged & through the cat-ion process will attract fertilisers & nutrients that are not absorbed by the plants & store them until needed. It also helps lock-up unwanted chemicals in the soil.

No Smell or Animal Waste: Soil Activator for Organic Gardens is 100% naturally sourced product & does not contain any animal waste & is smell free. Soil Activator for Organic Gardens is 100% natural & is certified by NASAA for use in Organic Gardens.
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Millermob
Perth
12th January 2012 10:19am
#UserID: 6368
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Shannyn says...
Hi there, I am getting 12 varieties of 6ft fruit trees (for free!!) and have to dig them out and replant them at my place. This site has helped me with 1) putting fertiliser in the holes that we dig and filling holes with water before planting 2) seasol watering 3) not overwatering it but rather using mulch.
I am wondering if they are supposed to be in full sun and how I could protect them as its the middle of summer here. Can I put up some tarps over them for a little while maybe?
I'm so very excited =)) but alot of hard work ahead of us with all the digging!! Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
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Shannyn
Glass House Mountains
19th January 2012 9:24pm
#UserID: 6430
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pam says...
Hi, I have a mandarin tree that I would like to move, has been in the ground for approx 35 years produces lots of fruit but now it has to be moved to make way for a bbq area, please help me with any info you can on how to prevent loosing it, thank you.
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pam8
fulham gardens SA
9th March 2012 10:28pm
#UserID: 6676
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John Mc says...
Pam, 35yrs it must be nearing the end of it's life, surely. IMO, it might consider buying a new more modern cultivar and start a fresh.
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JohnMc1
Warnervale NSW
10th March 2012 7:53pm
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Sharon Meredith says...
Hi

I also have fruit tree I would like to transplant, a small young mandarin and a lemon tree. I would really appreciate it if anyone could email me the parts of the book you spoke of in previous threads. Many Thanks.
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Sharon Meredith
Perth
25th March 2012 2:51pm
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Kenneth Ferguson says...
Hi,
my name is Kenneth Ferguson Email kenlive1951@hotmail.com & I would a copy of the page that tells you how to transplant a grown citrus tree to another location.
Kindest regards,
Ken
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Kenneth Ferguson
NSW
25th September 2012 9:18am
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Sue says...
Hi,

My name is Sue and greatly appreciate if I can have a copy of that page that tell u how to transplant a grown citrus tree to another location.

I have a citrus tree from my old house that I want to move to my new house.

My email is pentlandav@yahoo.com

Best Regards,
Sue
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Sue24
Sydney
23rd November 2012 10:59pm
#UserID: 7454
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paul and & ellen says...
Our son is about to remove a 3m lemon tree and we are thinkng of transplanting it to the peninsula in the hope of saving it.
But its now Dec / summer in Melb.
Are we wasting out time ??
Should we prune it and keep it in a bag until winter or attempt to replant it now ??
Any information would be much appreciated.
Regards Paul
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paul and ellen1
Melbourne
2nd December 2012 12:15pm
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MaryT says...
I know if I'm a tree I would rather be in my new home than be put in a bag then transplanted again. I'm not a tree but my garden philosophy is do what you want to do when you want to do it; don't wait for the "best time".
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MaryT
Sydney
2nd December 2012 12:47pm
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GardeningAustraliaWanabee says...
The "do what you want to" philosophy results in failure and disappointing results. It goes against the collective wisdom of years of experience and science.
If you transplant a mature citrus in the heat of summer it will die. Late autumn or spring is the time. Pruning back a third would help your chances when moving a mature tree.
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Chris
 
4th December 2012 7:20pm
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MaryT says...
Putting it in a bag then in the ground later is transplanting twice; worse in my view. The question was to transplant it into a bag or to transplant it in the ground, in the heat of summer either way, GAW. At least that's how I understood the question. As to my gardening philosophy which I stole from a couple of famous gardeners, fortunately it has not caused too much failure and disappointment. Just lucky, I guess. In any case, I can't wait for autumn or spring; might be dead by then.
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MaryT
Sydney
4th December 2012 8:19pm
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ricky davis says...
Can you please also let me knowhow to transplant mature ciyrus tree please I am moving and would like to move it. I is about two meters high.
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ricky davis
 
4th June 2013 8:07pm
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denise1 says...
The following is simple and how it was done ages ago.Cut a ring down a spade depth at least (can use a ditch spade) around the tree about 70 cms diameter (depending on variable factors). Any twig pruning should also be done at this time. A few weeks later it is ready to dig out and shift. At planting, water in fully with a rim around the puddle to help lots of water to soak in. Then dont water it for maybe a week. In friable/ loose soils you dont want to make the rootball too much wider as it could collapse and break some valuable roots. It should only be done in the planting seasons =autumn and spring.
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denise1
auckland NZ
5th June 2013 6:19pm
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Dreamlord Joe says...
Is it possible to take a branch from an existing, healthy but old lemon tree and grow it from a pot? I'm moving house and obviously can't/don't want to take the whole tree with me!
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Dreamlord Joe
Cloverdale
6th June 2013 12:42am
#UserID: 8038
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rowan says...
Joe, lemons are easy to grow from cuttings but you cannot get a larger branch to grow like that. It might be better to buy a whole new tree.
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Rowan
Casterton
6th June 2013 6:47am
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Dreamlord Joe says...
What a shame. It's such a healthy tree.
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Dreamlord Joe
Cloverdale
7th June 2013 12:52am
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Brain says...
If you have sentimental values attached to the lemon tree, then yes, try with the cutting, but do a few, as not all of them will be successful. If you really want lemon fruit production, then yes, get antother dwarf tree - that is ideally suitable to grow in a pot. Otherwise, you can try buying a Citrus Rootstock of some kind and try grafting the old lemon tree to it. In that way, you 'retain' your lemon tree. Mind you, this process can take a while, so better get started.
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Brain
Brisbane
7th June 2013 11:33am
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