Fruit Trees

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Fruit Trees

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Fruit Trees
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Advanced Fruit Trees

Fruit Trees > Advanced Fruit Trees


Advanced fruit trees, grown in 20 litre bags, they are the perfect size to start a productive orchard with. Please note that these are for Pickup only as they are too large for our couriers to transport.
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Asian Specialty Fruit Trees

Fruit Trees > Asian Specialty Fruit Trees


Asian Specialty Fruit Trees can be grown in Australia. There is a growing demand for these wonderful fruits that are idea for home gardeners.
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Berries Vines and Climbers

Fruit Trees > Berries Vines and Climbers


The big three in the vine world are the Passionfruit, Kiwifruit and Grape. All three require their fare share of care but they will reward you with an abundance of fruit in a relatively short time. All need a strong trellis, the Kiwifruit and Grape are more suited to pergola planting due to their deciduous nature. If you need all-round cover then go with the passionfruit. The Dragon Fruit - Pitaya is stunningly beautiful with a large flowers and melon like fruit. Berries, the most magnificent of the dessert fruits also need care because with neglect they will become the rampant monsters of your garden. They need a sunny airy location with some type of edging to stop them invading other parts of the garden. A trellis is a good idea as the long canes can be tied up allowing better circulation that will lesson the adverse effects of excess humidity. If growing in the subtropics it is highly recommended that some shade is provided.
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Bush foods Australia

Fruit Trees > Bush foods Australia


No garden could require less maintenance but give more rewards than an Australian native bushfood garden. Often referred to in Australian slang as Bush Tucker, the plants are well adapted to our harsh climate and their hardiness sees little use for fertilisers, pesticides and herbicides. Most bush foods are small due to the small amount of water they contain however they are packed with plenty of goodness and flavour. The bushfood industry is a growing one, however as a very new industry it has had to tackle species research, toxicology, cultivation practices, harvesting methods, market potential, consumer education and distribution networks all at once so many commercial growers are required to find their own markets. For the home grower there is nothing quite as Australian as growing our native bush foods and using them to create a truly unique and fascinating Australian cuisine.
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Citrus Trees

Fruit Trees > Citrus Trees


Citrus fruit trees are the most popular fruit bearing group of plants grown in Australia. The glossy green foliage, white scented flowers and colourful fruit make these trees just as suited to ornamental plantings and container growing as to the home orchard. The fruit is produced in abundance, is nutritious, versatile and can be left on the tree for long periods. Citrus grows best in an open and sunny position. Frost-free areas are preferable however most citrus will tolerate light frost once they are established. Correct planting and ongoing care as outlined in the catalogue is vital for long-term success. Selecting the varieties to grow is up to you, however we strongly recommend that your choice allows for the maximum spread of maturity times throughout the season. Frequently Asked Questions about Citrus
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Dwarf Fruit Trees

Fruit Trees > Dwarf Fruit Trees


There are many ways to have Dwarf Fruit Trees suitable for turning your small backyard into a thriving orchard. To grow dwarf trees successfully in containers all you need to do is supply a rich potting mix and re-pot regularly. Feed the trees every 6 months with a slow release fertiliser, provide plenty of sunlight, and keep the tree moist. The secret with keeping trees healthy and productive in containers is to re-pot and prune (roots and tops) at least every two years.
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Herbs and Spice Plants

Fruit Trees > Herbs and Spice Plants


Make your meals taste absolutely fantastic with the addition of home grown spices. As a culinary spice, there is virtually no such thing as an overdose and the spices are suitable for enhancing the flavour of a multitude of dishes. Fresh spices always taste better than the dried variety and offer many health-promoting benefits. Here are some of the more popular and hardy spices that are ideal for a kitchen garden.
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Multi Grafted Trees

Fruit Trees > Multi Grafted Trees


A Multi Grafted Fruit Tree is done through grafting different fruits from the same family onto the same tree. Another way to achieve the same outcome is to grow multiple fruit trees in the same hole.
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Nut Trees

Fruit Trees > Nut Trees


Growing nut trees in Australia is not new with pecans and macadamias being one of our most successful commercial crops. The Macadamia is a native of southern Queensland and northern New South Wales and is the only Australian native tree to be developed into a commercial crop. The Pecan is a native of America and is among the best of the multi-purpose trees providing a valuable nut crop and an excellent long-term investment. Chestnuts, Hazlenuts, Walnuts and Almonds are amongst the temperate group of nuts. We do not recommend them as commercially viable within the subtropics however they will bear adequate crops for the home orchardist.
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Perennial vegetables

Fruit Trees > Perennial vegetables


Perennial Vegetables make unusual, highly appealing ornamental plants that provide edible leaves or tubers for most of the year. Apart from being a plentiful food source they also serve other functions around the house such as screening (Arrowroot), ground covers (sweet potato), and edge plants used as a barrier against weeds (comfrey).
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Rare and Collectable Trees

Fruit Trees > Rare and Collectable Trees


Hard to find and collectable rare trees. Many have been sourced from rare fruit growers throughout Australia and further afield.
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Rootstock

Fruit Trees > Rootstock


A rootstock is a plant grown from seed that can be used to graft on a scion and create a named variety.
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Subtropical Fruit Trees

Fruit Trees > Subtropical Fruit Trees


Subtropical fruit trees such as avocado, custard apples and babacos reach their greatest potential in coastal regions from Sydney to Mackay. Many will grow well even as far south as Melbourne in sheltered micro climates, maybe not commercially but certainly worth trying in the backyard orchard.
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Temperate Fruit Trees

Fruit Trees > Temperate Fruit Trees


This category is largely made up of deciduous fruit trees. When selecting temperate fruit trees it's important to consider their pollination and chill hour requirements. As the coastal region or northern NSW and south east Qld has such a mild climate, care must be taken to choose deciduous fruit trees appropriate for our mild winters. The selected varieties we sell have the lowest chill factor of their groups. If you are looking for stonefruit we have selected lowchill varieties that are listed in the subtropical fruit tree category.
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Tropical Fruit Trees

Fruit Trees > Tropical Fruit Trees


Tropical fruit Trees or the 'exotics' grow naturally in lush forests where they are protected from cold winds and they thrive in warm and humid conditions. Growing conditions in home gardens vary substantially and will often determine the type of trees you can grow. Winter cold (chill factor), summer warmth (humidity and temperature) and the length of the frost-free season need to be considered. Many tropical fruits can be grown outside their ideal climate. We are constantly amazed by the fabulous home-orcharding success stories we hear from around Australia.

Native Raspberry - Peter's Thornless PBR

$27.00 ($27.00-$27.00 choose a size)

Take a walk along forest margins or your local creek in eastern Australia, and you will come across Native Raspberries. This cultivar however is completely Thornless, and was selected by local Peter Hardwick. Being completely thornless, it is a pleasure to pick the fruit from its scrambling branches. Berries are bright red, sweet and juicy when well watered and grown with plenty of organic matter. The canes can produce fruit in as little as 6 months and respond well to fertiliser, compost and mulch. Vigorous and scrambling to 1.5m, with a suckering habit which is easily controlled with mowing, the plant is best staked to keep the fruit off the ground and keep it tidy. The leaves of native raspberry can also be used in tea and skin care products. A tea can be made from an infusion for 15 mins from up to six shoots of fresh native raspberry leaf in a teapot. The leaf can also be used as a dried herb. The flavour of the leaf is mildly herbaceous and astringent. It mixes well with other native teas like lemon myrtle and cinnamon myrtle. Research on the leaf of native raspberry shows that it contains beneficial plant compounds like pomolic acid, euscaphic acid, gallic acid and ellagic acid. This plant has Plant Breeder Rights and is not permitted to be propagated and sold for a commercial purpose.
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Pistachio - Sirora - Female

$89.00

High yielding female tree, pair with a male for pollination. Grows to be a small tree or shrub. Best suited to areas with cold winters and hot dry summers, requiring 1000 hours below 7.5 degrees in the winter. Summer and autumn need to be dry to prevent fungal problems. Pistachios are dioecious meaning male and females flowers are produced on separate trees, one of each will be required for fruit set. Spreading habit, wider than it is tall. Pistachios tend toward biennial cropping, meaning they alternately bear lots of nuts one year, then very little the following year

Pistachio - Kerman Female

$89.00

The female Kerman Pistachio is popular in commercial production and has good flavour with a nice green colour to the kernal. Pistachio trees are best suited to areas with cold winters and hot dry summers, requiring 1000 hours below 7.5 degrees in the winter. Summer and autumn need to be dry to prevent fungal problems. Pistachios are dioecious meaning male and females flowers are produced on separate trees, one of each will be required for fruit set. Spreading habit, wider than it is tall. Pistachios tend toward biennial cropping, meaning they alternately bear lots of nuts one year, then very little the following year

Avocado - Shepard (B)

$64.00 ($64.00-$79.00 choose a size)

A small to medium pear-shaped fruit with thick, green skin that peels easily. The fruit has an excellent flavour, medium oil content and does not turn brown when cut. H Feb/March The tree has a spreading habit and is a high yielding. It displays good resistance to frost and anthracnose.

Lime - Tahitian

$37.00 ($37.00-$39.00 choose a size)

The small to medium fruit is pale lemon-yellow with smooth thin skin. The flesh is a translucent pale green, tender and juicy with a true acid lime flavour. It is best to pick the fruit green as it can suffer from rot if left to ripen on the tree.

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