Kwai Muk

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Kwai Muk Fruit Trees for Sale

The Kwai Muk is native to China. It is a slow-growing, slender tree that can be grown as an ornamental specimen plant due to its erect growing habit and attractive long slender leaves.

The round fruits have a velvety, brownish, thin, tender skin.The fruit is best when harvested from the tree completely ripe. When mature the pulp is orange-red to red, soft, acid to subacid and of an excellent flavour. The fruit can be seedless or may contain 1 to 7 small pale seeds. The pulp is delicious eaten raw or can be preserved or sundried. Self pollinating, Ripening from February to April.

The trees are not as cold tolerant as initially thought and are injured by brief drops in temperature to -2°C. Mature trees have endured -3°C which is similar to a mango or jakfruit.

 

Kwai Muk

$24.90 ($17.90-$24.90 choose a size)

Kwai Muk produces a 5cm wide orange fruit that is subacid and excellent flavour. It can be eaten fresh when fully ripe, dried, or preserved. The tree grows slowly and good for landscaping. More cold hardy than the Jakfruit.

Kwai Muk - Richmond

$34.95 ($34.00-$34.95 choose a size)

This selection has been grown and fruited in Northern NSW, producing orange fruit that is subacid and excellent flavour. It can be eaten fresh when fully ripe, dried, or preserved. The tree grows slowly and good for landscaping. More cold hardy than the Jakfruit

Kwai Muk - Richmond

$34.95 ($34.00-$34.95 choose a size)

This selection has been grown and fruited in Northern NSW, producing orange fruit that is subacid and excellent flavour. It can be eaten fresh when fully ripe, dried, or preserved. The tree grows slowly and good for landscaping. More cold hardy than the Jakfruit

Kwai Muk

$24.90 ($17.90-$24.90 choose a size)

Kwai Muk produces a 5cm wide orange fruit that is subacid and excellent flavour. It can be eaten fresh when fully ripe, dried, or preserved. The tree grows slowly and good for landscaping. More cold hardy than the Jakfruit.

Kwai Muk Reviews & Tips

Star Rating

David Mcminn
6y ago

Blue Knob, NSW, Australia

Kwai Muk

I have found this species to be quite cold hardy after going through the black frost in 2007. 6 trees lost all their leaves but recovered well. One tree was completely unaffected.PS We recorded -4 degrees C at 8 am in the morning.

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