Testimonials Shop News Specials Catalogue Contact Forum Blog My Account My Edibles
50 percent off when you pre order
50 percent off when you pre orderBare root coming soonScionwoodHerbs and Vegegatables
Forum Rules | Updates

<< Back to Daleys Fruit Tree Forum

Citrus trouble

    3 responses

Christobel starts with ...
I have tried twice to plant a citrus tree in my backyard (first lime, then lime/orange splitzer) and it isn’t working at all. I have successfully grown chilies, grasses, pittosporums in the same soil, so not sure what the problem is. I planted in clay mixed with gypsum and chook manure and occasional citrus food. Any ideas based on the image?
About the Author
Christobel
Bulleen
11th November 2017 2:11pm
#UserID: 17267
Posts: 2
View All Christobel's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (1)
People who Like this Question Fruitylicious1
Fruitylicious1 says...
Planting citrus trees is a bit tricky I've seen a lot of my friends failed in their attempts for various reasons. The most common are;
1. Drainage - If you have heavy clay you might have to create a raised garden bed or plant it in a mound for good drainage. Mix horticultural sand, compost, a bit of aged manure and garden soil to create the mound or raised garden bed. In place of sand you can use perlite, vermiculite and pine bark. If you are planting it to a mound drive two or more stakes into the ground and tie your plant to avoid the plant to fall over.
2. Site - place your tree in a zone with minimal wind disturbance. This guys hate windy sites especially the chilly antarctic blast during winter and the hot desert wind from the interior during summer. Probably close to the western or northern side of a building or brick wall for additional warmth during winter if you have frost in your area. If you have an enclosed sunny courtyard even better. If you cannot avoid a windy site you can erect a wind barrier for your plant. Just drive four steel star post into the ground maybe 2 ft away from your plant and screw in a sturdy shade cloth around three sides of the steel post. Keep open the less windy side for plant maintenance.
3. Negligence/lack of info - some people thought that domesticated plants can survive on their own just like in the forest without human intervention. In most cases the neglected plant just wither and die within a short period of time. Unless the plant is already well established the plant has a higher rate of survival on its own.
If you can address these two issues namely good drainage and close to brick wall or building zone with minimal hot and cold wind disturbance you are more likely to succeed.
If for whatever reason you cannot address these two vital issues, plant it in a 25-35 liter pot, growing bag or 1/2 wine barrel. Choose the dwarf variety for easy maintenance. By planting in a pot you can instantly address the drainage and site issues because you can always move your plant to the most favorable zone in your place for your babies. You don't even need to amend your soil. Just buy a premium potting mix for Citrus. Don't buy cheapos for best and fast result. Just fertilize after 6 months when the goodies in the premium potting mix are exhausted.
After planting as per usual water your trees with diluted seasol or liquid fish manure as per manufacturers' specs. Don't over water though and apply mulch like lucerne hay or other similar organic mulch to keep them cool especially this coming hot and sizzling summer. Also apply epsom salt from time to time to keep them lush and green.
Hope my experience with growing these beauties will help you a bit.
HAPPY GARDENING :-)
NOTE: CAN'T SEE ANY IMAGE UPLOADED AT THE MOMENT.
About the Author
Fruitylicious1
TAMWORTH,2340,NSW
11th November 2017 7:36pm
#UserID: 16885
Posts: 617
View All Fruitylicious1's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Original Post was last edited: 12th November 2017 8:51am
Christobel says...
Thanks for the info Fruity! I’ll persevere.
About the Author
Christobel
Bulleen
12th November 2017 10:39am
#UserID: 17267
Posts: 2
View All Christobel's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(1) LIKE this Question (0)
People who Like this Answer: Fruitylicious1
Fruitylicious1 says...
Hi Christobel
Another technique in addressing poor draining clayey site though a bit harder to implement is to dig a hole one meter wide and one meter deep. Pour in 5 kg of clay breaker (dolomite), water in well. Don't plant straightaway. Water it weekly until the hole drains freely. Then incorporate a well draining mix of premium potting mix, perlite, coarse fine bark and also add in peat moss in a ratio of 40-20-30-10 in that order. It's a tall order but very effective if you don't want to create a raised garden bed or a mound.
Again Happy Gardening :-)
About the Author
Fruitylicious1
TAMWORTH,2340,NSW
13th November 2017 7:01am
#UserID: 16885
Posts: 617
View All Fruitylicious1's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)

REPLY to this forum

Email: Password:
display Name: Suburb:  
Pictures: Add Another Picture
Body:
 
Remember to include a picture if possible

<< Back to Daleys Fruit Tree Forum