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Mysterious root problem

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Jogardener starts with ...
I had some tomatoes and capsicums growing and noticed the roots had cankers when I dug them up. Do I need to treat my soil for fungal issues before planting anything new? I brought 2 beautiful Grumichamas that I am reluctant to plant out.
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Jogardener
BIRKDALE,4159,QLD
27th January 2018 11:10pm
#UserID: 16535
Posts: 7
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Original Post was last edited: 27th January 2018 11:11pm
Fruitylicious1 says...
Hi Jogardener

Your tomato roots was attacked by rot-knot nematodes. They are neither fungal or bacterial but microscopic worms causing havoc to your plants most especiallt tomatoes. The upper symptoms is usually stunted growth and overall decline of the affected plant.

They like to attack areas that are not crop rotated or fallowed for quite a period of time.

There are a few cultural practices that you can easily perform before bringing in the big chemical gun as a last resort:

1. Practice crop rotation. Don't plant the same family of plants in the same spot year after year. Nematodes thrive in non-diversified field.

2. Solarize the affected area for at least 6-12 weeks to cook the bugs. Use a polyethylene clear plastic tarp over a wetted area weigh down at the edge and middle to stabilize it. Its also advisable to incorporate manure to increase biological activity that will fight the nematode population.

3. Flooding. You can also flood the area if you have a lot of surplus water to kill the worms. Alternate between 2-3 weeks of flooding and drying to be effective.

4. Chemical (nematicide) Do this as a last resort. There are some nematicides available in the i-net but since your area is not huge solarization or flooding with manure amendment are your best option to get rid of those pesky soil borne microscopic worms.

After the treatment you can plant your beautiful grumichamas with peace of mind knowing your soil is as good as any.

As Always....Happy Gardening :-)
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Fruitylicious1
TAMWORTH,2340,NSW
28th January 2018 7:11pm
#UserID: 16885
Posts: 709
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Original Post was last edited: 28th January 2018 7:21pm
Jogardener says...
Thank you for that. Sounds like a long process to get rid of them! I have actually emptied out the raised bed onto my general garden bed and have already planted my Grumichama and two Olive trees that were in pots. Yikes! Maybe chemical is the only way to go. I also have an established dwarf mulberry in that bed that has had a terrible year for fruit...I'm guessing the nematodes are probably everywhere in the garden. Thank you for the advice.
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Jogardener
BIRKDALE,4159,QLD
2nd February 2018 1:29pm
#UserID: 16535
Posts: 7
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