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Passionfruit dropping fruit

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kaiser soze starts with ...
Hi All

Hoping some one can help me with my passionfruit vines I have 2 a panama red and endure gold 2 years old the fruit on both is shrivelling up and the new fruit is dropping off I was hand pollinating but stopped the bees are all over them before I get a chance not sure what is going thoughts?
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kaiser soze
Geraldton
14th April 2019 1:49pm
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David01 says...
Hi kaiser soze,

Passionfruit needs a lot of water and fertilizer, mainly potassium (K) during fruiting. My tree needs water twice a day and fertilizer to set/develope fruits. Reduce/stop water and fertilizer in winter. See attached photos of my tree. Cheers
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David01
CRAIGIEBURN,3064,VIC
30th April 2019 11:45am
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Amanda says...
Agree with David01 ...especially as you are in Geraldton - which is a semi-arid zone. I had the same problem there too. When you get any of those really hot easterly winds (the 'Beasterly'!) you need to water morning and evening also.
You won't need to hand pollinate - they are both self fertile varieties and you will get tonnes of fruit from your panama red's up there - they love it in Gero.
Use a balanced fertiliser with trace elements also....
I road tested Enduro Gold down here in Bunbury and it's going great guns also...get's really big fruit and loads of them - very precocious too, like the Sunshine Special - fruits in it's first year.


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Amanda
Bunbury
7th May 2019 11:05am
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Ricky Bobby1 says...
Cheers for the feedback we did have fluctuations in weather over that period I thought I was overwatering and fertilizing I have been putting all the chook poo on them the Enduro gold is loaded with fruit same size as your photo so I thought it might be just aborting some fruit because there is too much the big red panama has been off this year still massive fruit just not as much as previous years. I got some sulphate of potash today that seems to have a lot of potassium should I use that?
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Ricky Bobby1
w.a
8th May 2019 10:18pm
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Amanda says...
It could be dropping those fruit because of the weather also - especially if it has rained and/or got colder. Our Sunshine special has done the same to all the flowers that made fruit a few weeks back...when we got our first rains/storm.
As long as it's not too many it should be fine. I wouldn't worry too much about overwatering if you are on sand, as I left the sprinkler going on ours overnight a few times and it wasn't at all bothered by that!
They do have a shallow rootsystem that like to spread right out - so make sure that it's watered out to at least a 1m radius from the trunk - preferably 2m - that way it can harvest more water.
The Enduro Gold did shrivel up large fruit here over winter - but I thought it was just because it was in a more shady spot and was cold and wet - so I ahve started a new vine in a much warmer spot for winter - so I will be interested to see if it still happens.
I can't grow Panama Gold here, for eg - as it's too wet and cold over winter, and Panama Red grows and fruits well but it fruits too late in the summer and the fruit tends to go rotten at the stem as the rains come.
Enduro Gold is a new variety so we don't know much about it yet.
A little potash is fine - but don't over do it.
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Amanda
LESCHENAULT,6233,WA
9th May 2019 4:25pm
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David01 says...
Yes, you can apply some potash if the temp still above 20C. Apply small dose at a time as Amanda suggested. Reduce water and no fertiliser when the winter is coming as plant is not active if temp drops below 15C. Cheers
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David01
CRAIGIEBURN,3064,VIC
11th May 2019 1:41pm
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Original Post was last edited: 11th May 2019 1:47pm
Ricky Bobby1 says...
Hi thanks for the feedback daytime temps are still around 25C I will put a small dose on once a week for 3 weeks see if it settles down.
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Ricky Bobby1
w.a
11th May 2019 5:44pm
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Amanda says...
This is interesting because kaiser soze/Ricky Bobby1 is on sand, on the mid west coast. This is a growing environment that is completely different to where you are David01...no offence hey.
I fertilise all my evergreen plants over winter here - and I did up there too. I jsut gave them less.
They are still actively growing - but certainly slower in the more southern places. Geraldton is like Brisbane in climate - but with only about 300mm of sky water in winter.
My climate is a bit like Los Angeles...and yet Bunbury is on the same latitude as Sydney, Santiago, Cape Town.
We also have the Leewin Current - which is quite unique for a west coastal land mass - it brings warm waters down from the equator..
WA is really different to the east coast when it comes to specifics. Reducing water is not an option for anyone in Geraldton right now - it's not even an option for me - 700kms south..I still need to water every second to third day - and yet winter is only a few weeks away - along with a total watering ban.

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Amanda
LESCHENAULT,6233,WA
11th May 2019 9:11pm
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Amanda says...
I am also wondering where the caveat about not adding potash below 20C comes from? I have never heard this particular myth...where did it come from, so that we can nip it in the bud please?
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Amanda
LESCHENAULT,6233,WA
11th May 2019 10:45pm
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Amanda says...
Here are some of ours that I spoke about RikkyBobby1 - but the Sunshine Special variety. I am not worried about these at all as this is normal for the time of the year/situation. As long as your older/bigger fruits are still normal (like ours here, for eg) then all should be ok.
Our vine is properly fed and actually got the second small side dressing of potash a few weeks ago - but not for flowering (as that is a Myth)

f you haven't got Sunshine special and you have space or want to try a purple passionfruit one day - then I can highly recommend too btw. It was bred in WA, for WA conditions - and it's a ripper vine.
It grows well in Geraldton also - I had an enormous one there (see pic also) It's a lovely passionfruit - large, sweeter than the usual black/purples - but still has that great strong passionfruit flavour...it's my favourite and it also fruits in it's first season in the ground...very precocious.

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Amanda
LESCHENAULT,6233,WA
12th May 2019 6:32pm
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David01 says...
Hi Amanda,
In general the growth will stop when the temperature drops approx. 10C below or 17C above the optimum growth temp. Passionfruit has optimal growth temp range from 20C to 25C. And Panama gold or red is less hardy than black so I don’t apply potash when the temp drops below 15C. However, there is another important parameter we need to consider that we are in middle of May, the winter is around the corner thus temp could drop further and because the feeding taking effect after few weeks. That is why the figure 20C was suggested. You can continue to apply potash during winter but this just do more harm than good for the tree. However, sometimes the term winter is not clear as our winter has temp drops below 5C while Brisbane winter may be more than 10C. Thus for tropical stop fertilizer when temp drop below 15C regardless locations and reduce water accordingly by checking the soil moisture to ensure it is not too dry. Cheers.
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David01
CRAIGIEBURN,3064,VIC
12th May 2019 9:47pm
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Original Post was last edited: 13th May 2019 10:06am
Amanda says...
Ah ok David01 - makes more sense now. Very different in Geraldton to Vic -yes. Soil temps still 25C at 1m depth up there. Their growing season is the reverse in many ways - the summer being scorching and super dry and windy - so it's "e;maintenance"e; mode for most stuff then - most of the growing action occurs over winter..!

Also - they have to irrigate pretty much all year round, in their gardens...I think they have had less than 30mm of rain in the past 6months, for eg. So they have more control over water application.

I still have to apply it because the rainfall is higely leaching on our well-draining deep sands :/

But agree - I apply a lot less for sure. It's also why I have clayed our sand - to help prevent that leaching of mobile elements.

I try never to add anything that is not indicated/necessary because of that knock-on effect also. Have learnt that lesson the hard way over the years...and if I had a buck for everytime someone told me to add Epsom salts I'd be a bit richer...haha...
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Amanda
LESCHENAULT,6233,WA
13th May 2019 12:39pm
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Ricky Bobby1 says...
Hey good conversation I didn't know any of that stuff so learning heaps!

I was chucking on blood and bone plus dynamic lifter/seasol whenever.

Amanda I would like to grow another one but not much room left with the 2 I got cant really remember the other variety besides it was called the Big Bopper lol.

I was probably getting a little greedy with the fruit I have had hundreds given some way and traded the rest of the pulp is vac sealed in the freezer so a bit of dead loss isn't a big deal plus they are still loaded with fruit.

On to the next challenge I have advanced mango and avocado trees coming this week nothing is easy to grow in Gero so I will probably be asking for some more advice which is much appreciated cheers!
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Ricky Bobby1
w.a
14th May 2019 11:11am
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Amanda says...
RikkyBobby1 - I should just mention that I only add the small amount of extra potash for improving fruit quality - when the vine is fruiting - not for any other reason (ie: not for flowering, and not because it's deficient in potash, or it has sappy growth etc...it's perfectly healthy)
It's only about 2 tablespoons spread about a meter out from the trunk and only twice over summer.
The fertiliser I use 9N:2P:7K:12S.
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Amanda
LESCHENAULT,6233,WA
14th May 2019 12:59pm
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Amanda says...
Looks good RikkyBobby1 - nice one. Are you are on the dunes there also - near the coast or in the hills?
We were in Wokarena Heights - on 30acres of sand dune 1km from Drummonds beach - hell-windy and salty. The hardest gardening gig I have ever had to be honest - as the tap water was also shocking (I had it tested at a lab) and then blasted by that 40C plus easterly furnace wind in summer.
My old profile is still here in My Edibles - but I have learnt a bit more since then.
A lot of folks have not got fruit from Big Boppa btw - so it's great to see yours there. I suspect it needs cross-pollination so that interesting.

Avocado and mango are going to need some very special care for you to grow them there - especially the avocado.
I actually never knew anyone who had a mature avodado tree growing there - in the 8yrs we were there. I failed with 2 also.
The mangoes also struggled with the salinity issues and crap sand.

Not to put you off - but advanced trees cost good money so you want the best start for them?
If you are using scheme/tap water - do you have problems with scale buildup in your kettle and on your shower screens?
If so - it would be worth getting it tested (you can do this with Think Water if they are still there?)

When I had ours tested, after having many problems, it was pretty bad. It had class 3 salinity and was very hard - with high calcium carbonate levels.
This is not good for many sub tropicals that prefer slighty acidic soils.
The salinity from the water and the ocean winds (gales in Gero!) can cause stunting and tip and margin burning - as most fruit and nut trees are sensitive to salts (most mediterranean plants are ok though)

The scheme water comes from various bores in Gero - and some are worse than others. You may have a decent bore source where you are, but we didn't.

The link below has the Quality testing results for last year, from the water corp. It's still not too flash and I would be tempted to get it tested - as ours was worse than their QA results.
Anyway - forewarmed is forearmed I say...so if you have any rainwater stored then you may want to save it for your avocados especially - to either shandy your tap water - or use it for a fesh water flush every so often - to leach away salts and chloride.
See how you go first I guess? But people expect their tap water to be good enough for plants, because they drink it....but this is not the case - plants don't have kidneys - and the salt and lime really affect the soil chemistry also.
The avocado is going to need serious wind protection there - they hate wind.
You also really need to improve your sand for these kinds of trees. I am the biggest fan of a local WA product made by Soil Solver - called Clay Plus, for our conditions. I have been using it for nearly a decade, in our coastal sands, and I won't plant anything without it now (I have been claying sands for longer tho - like our farmers do here?)
It is an amended kaolin clay that has been fully tested (for heavy metals etc) has the added minerals/trace elements and has high clay and silt content (beware as some products may be high in sand and not have been tested or balanced - so ask for their lab results (as I have checked some out that has not been up to scratch at all)
It very easy to apply and water in because it has been milled/pulverised.
(and no I am not paid to say that - I genuinely love this product - as I do the Brunnings fine coir too...you can see the results for yourself, in the before and after pics I will add..)
Don't use benonite clays or benonite based granular wetting agents - benonite clay will increase your pH further. Be very careful of it - if you decide to go down that path - but I wouldn't recommend it - having had so many dramas with it, like many others, on the coast.

Add some good quality compost as well (pH test it first if you have alkalinity problems where you are - either in the sand - or the water...you don't want to add a dodgy alkaline compost) and mix it all together with your sand - in the planting hole, with lots of water...
I don't use manure anymore - it causes too many problems in our situation - but it's up to you.

I do use the Brunnings brand of fine coir, the Mega Block (from Bunnings) in my planting hole also - avocados also love it and it will really help get them established - as they need moisture at all times in our sands and summers - especially up there with those drying winds.
Pre-charge your coir with a little bit of liquid fertiliser in the water.
You really need to get an idea of your pH tho (soil and water) because you may need to stick to acidifying fertilisers.

Anyway - that's probably enough for now and I have my fingers crossed for your avo's! Maybe David can add some other tips too.

Here are some pics of my two sand-gardens. It has cost a lot to improve the sands but it has been 100% worth it (but these are pretty big gardens - so they are never cheap - lol - just ask my poor husband)
The Gero garden ws 7yrs old when we left. It was a bare paddock (prob's not impressive to anyone who hasn't been to our Mid-West tho) The garden here is also nearly 7yrs too. The climate and rainfall are far more plant friendly down here though - so it has been easier.
And way less WIND...! :D

I hope some of this can help - and any other Sandgropers struggling on the coastal sands...



https://www.watercorporation.com.au/-/media/files/residential/about-us/our-performance/drinking-water-quality/annual-report-2017.pdf


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Amanda
LESCHENAULT,6233,WA
18th May 2019 10:46am
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kaiser soze says...
Hi Amanda

Thanks for the info I am going to need all the help I can get!!!

I am in Drummond Cove west side of Chapman Rd the soil on the north side of the house is about a foot of black clay then red loam.

Yep cost me a small fortune buying advanced trees hopefully have a better chance of survival the look hardened grafted also and I reckon about 2m tall.

Funny you should mention water I was just reading that I don't get any scale but I am worried about the water its very dodgy and I don't have rainwater yet. None of my other trees or plants seem to suffer but they aren't avocados.

I was going to plant the avos in a mound of sandy loam from patience sandiland mixed with premium potting mix and gypsum I have the brunning coir with pine mulch over top? I will grab some clay plus.

Your gardens look great I have a long way to go before mine looks anything like that lol.
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kaiser soze
Geraldton
18th May 2019 3:14pm
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Amanda says...
Hi Kaiser soze...well that's interesting about your black clay and red loam in Drummond cove. My folks lived there also and I am trying to picture where that is because there's not much of that around in the area - but there are patches of red loam etc there, as there was a natural floodway through there once upon a time - coming from the Dolby Drive area.

You shouldn't need to add any more clay then - as you have it already - did you bring it in - or is it there naturally?
What's the pH like of the red loam and black clay?

What is the drainage like? (how long does it take for a hole filled with water to drain, for eg?)
What other fruit trees are you growing? (might give some clues to what your soil and water are like)

What you are planning to do sounds ok to me, so far.

(Edit: Looking back over your historical posts and pics you have posted - your previous avocado and mango trees have suffered from salinity and/or lack of water burning.
Are you still at the same property?

This is not unexpected in the area due to the strong ocean winds bringing in salt - and then the harsh drying conditions dehydrating the plants as well - which then causes the burning (as does too much fertiliser 'salts' without adequate watering, for eg)

I had the same problems up there - you need to water quite a lot to have any success - plus choose your fertilisers carefully)

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Amanda
LESCHENAULT,6233,WA
20th May 2019 11:27am
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Original Post was last edited: 20th May 2019 11:31am
kaiser soze says...
Hi Amanda

I am next to the floodway west side of the 440 the soil is all natural but varies a lot on my block the north side is as mentioned I was surprised too thought it would be all sand.

I did a quick ph for blueberries a couple of years ago and it was on the alkaline side from memory so I grow them in pots now straight coco peat with blood and bone going great guns.

Drainage is good for the whole back yard there is two big soak wells besides the passionfruit trees I have paw paw bananas and a wicked kaffir lime out the front all going well people are amazed by how well they are doing and I sell a lot of the fruit or trade for crays etc. lol

I was in Tom Price with the previous posts thinking I was moving back home and could plant them out didn't happen they stayed in pots eventually died a slow death.

Round 2!!!

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kaiser soze
Geraldton
20th May 2019 11:58pm
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Amanda says...
Tom Price would have been hell for the avo's for sure kaiser soze...eeek!
Maybe that soil will be a saving grace for you in Drummonds hey.
You can actually grow a very wide range of fruit trees there because the winter is so much warmer than Perth.
White sapote was a star performer for us there....and all the citrus of course. Chiku also did really well.
Must admit that I miss those winters - for plant growing, down here!
There are some things that just won't handle the summers there though - or at least are not worth the effort of trying to keep them going - but that is the same wherever we are isn't it.
You avo will need wind and sunburn protection - using a light shade cloth and/or something like Drought Shield perhaps.
Keep it really bushy as sunburnt bark can spell the end of an avo tree. Some folks will paint the trunk and branches with white paint - to protect them also (not sure what type - never done it myself but others here know what to use)
They grow avocados in Carnarvon - but they have had dramas....
https://www.abc.net.au/news/rural/2013-05-13/wach-low-carnarvon-avos/4686222

The Ag Dept has some really helpful info also
https://www.agric.wa.gov.au/crops/horticulture/fruit/avocados

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Amanda
LESCHENAULT,6233,WA
26th May 2019 11:18am
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