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Which seedling do I keep on a Poly-embryonic Mango

    7 responses

Libb starts with ...
I've been doing some research on which seedling is a true representation or clone of the mother plant and I'm not having much success in getting a real answer, there seems to be 2 contentious issues, some people are say to keep the most vigorous and dominant seedling and it will be a clone of the mother, whilst others are saying to keep the weakest and smallest seedling because it will be a clone of the mother. Now which theory is really correct? Does anybody really know? If you do could you please provide a reason for your opinion. We are getting some seedling that have multiple shoots and are ready to be re-potted, it would be really nice to know which ones to keep so we don't waste many years on nurturing a plant that will yield unknown fruit quality
Thank you
Lib
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Libb
Baw Baw Vic
17th February 2018 10:19am
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Fruitylicious1 says...
HI Libb

According to the Government of Western Australia Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development, "e;The polyembryonic mango seed produce a number of shoots, one of which originates from fertilization. The fertilized seedling is often weak and stunted and should be discarded. The other seedlings are clones of the mother tree"e;.

You can contact Tara Slaven the W.A. Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development staff who authored the W.A. Government publication about growing true to type polyembryonic mango from seed for more in-depth info on Tel: +61 (0)8 9368 3333 or e-mail them at enquiries@agric.wa.gov.au

Other Australian Department of Agriculture State will tell you the same story. I am pretty sure the people who wrote these publications are reliable to give advice to thousands of farmers in Australia who earn their living tilling the soil and any wrong information given will greatly affect their livelihood which may be even a subject for litigation.

I am just curious about your address, Mount Baw Baw is one of the snow resort in Vic. Mango tree and snow is like trying to mix oil with water they don't go well together. But if you have a sizeable heated greenhouse or polytunnel its worth a try.

Happy Gardening :-)
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Fruitylicious1
TAMWORTH,2340,NSW
17th February 2018 7:30pm
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Original Post was last edited: 17th February 2018 8:04pm
Mango Mike says...
Libb... You are right that research shows a few different answers.... I would just re-pot the lot & after 12 months graft what varieties you want.... You will have a smaller tree and get fruit quicker......Otherwise its really pot luck....... Mike
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Mango Mike
KARRABIN,4306,QLD
18th February 2018 2:22pm
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Markmelb says...
I agree with Mike - plant them all - hope you can get them thru a Victorian High country winter. I managed to graft here in melb due to perfect timing of 20c nights in early December - KP onto its own Melbourne harvested and grown seedling.
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1
  
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Markmelb
MOUNT WAVERLEY,3149,VIC
18th February 2018 10:12pm
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Original Post was last edited: 18th February 2018 10:20pm
Libb says...
Hi, thank you for your response, so you are obviously under the impression that the strongest most vigorous shoot should be kept. Yes we are in the Victorian high country however our farm is not on top of Mt Baw Baw it is located at a place called Vesper which is not far away but is actually fairly close to the summit of Mt Toorongo, the farm is probably 550 to 600 meters above sea level, we probably get only a few weeks of snow per year at best. We were hoping to grow a Mango indoors and keep it pruned so the height does not get out of control. We managed to do it with a banana and thought it would be fun to have an indoor Mango tree. Here are some photos of the banana and our Mango seedlings on the worlds best propagating tray (hehehe)
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1

Picture: 2

Picture: 3

Picture: 4
  
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Libb
VESPER,3833,VIC
25th February 2018 11:45am
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Fruitylicious1 says...
Hi Libb

Wow!!! I am pretty impressed by your efforts. Fruiting banana near Mt Baw Baw. If you are that ingenious and resourceful, a mango tree in your place is not an impossibility. Again, continue doing your research and development with regards to your dream of having a mango tree in your nick of the woods. Please keep us hanging at the edge of our seat by your future updates.

And yes, I will go for the strongest seedlings.

As Always....Happy Gardening :-)
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Fruitylicious1
TAMWORTH,2340,NSW
26th February 2018 9:34am
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Original Post was last edited: 26th February 2018 10:02am
Libb says...
Hi Mike,
Not really understanding as to what you mean about grafting. Usually grafting involves choosing an scion off a mature proven fruit bearing plant and grafting it to a resilient root stock. Unfortunately we don't have access to a mature plant and are planning to grow these from seed. We just don't have the room to grow that many, so we wish to choose what we believe will be a clone of the Honey Gold mother plant.
Thanks again
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Libb
VESPER,3833,VIC
1st March 2018 7:24pm
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Mango Mike says...
Honey Gold is Polyembryonic & yes either a clone Or a sexual other plant can be produced..... What I am suggesting is that you germinate the seed from the mango when they have hardened off after appox 3 months and transplant into a pot each..... After appox. 12 months the plant (rootstock) would be then grafted as you said from a scion from the mother tree..... You maybe able to get scionwood for the Honey Gold but I think its under plant breeders rights..... I would still try to get whatever number you can to germinate as you then can either see if it is a clone up to say 5 years away or graft & have fruit the same year....... Mike
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Mango Mike
KARRABIN,4306,QLD
2nd March 2018 8:04pm
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