Testimonials Shop News Specials Catalogue Contact Forum Blog My Account My Edibles
Fruit Tree Packs
Fruit Tree PacksUse Code PickUp15 to get 15% off when you pick up in our Kyogle ShopRare Fruit magazinesOur New Look Magazine is Out Now
Forum Rules | Updates
<< Back to Daleys Fruit Tree Forum

Containing mulberry tree roots

    6 responses

Jacelyn starts with ...
About 4.5 years ago I planted a Hicks Fancy (I think) morus nigra in my little backyard in Nollamara. The description on the tag had the word 'compact' in it so I thought this meant small. I was so wrong lol In ignorance, I planted it about 50cm from my boundary fence. In the past 4 years it has become a giant monster of a tree and is easily 3-4m high, despite being cut back every year.

A few nights ago, my neighbour from the other side of the fence came to tell me that our dividing fence (which was already leaning to her side when I moved in) has started to form cracks at the base and she believes this was a result of the tree roots causing damage to the fence (there are no cracks on my side that I can see but I don't disbelieve her).

She was very lovely about it is happy for me to continue to enjoy this harvest (it has been fruiting like mad) and not rush to make any decision regarding the tree straightaway.

I guess my first questions is, is it possible for me to dig down between the tree and the fence, sever any roots that may be growing in that direction, and somehow block future roots from growing towards the fence with say a concrete slab or something?

I had intended to cut it back quite severely after the harvest ends and see if I can get any cuttings to strike from the pruning, but is it possible to have such a tree dug up, moved and still survive?

I really love this tree and will be sad to see it go. Hopefully I can keep a part of it going by way of cuttings!

Thanks in advance for any help or advice :)
About the Author
Jacelyn
NOLLAMARA
31st October 2017 5:15pm
#UserID: 2336
Posts: 21
View All Jacelyn's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Fruitylicious1 says...
Yea, if you really love the tree you can dig a trench between your tree and the fence about two feet deep at least 3 to 4 meters long. Insert concrete hollow blocks or large concrete pavers in the trench. You can stabilize the structure with crushed rock or pour concrete along the gaps. Its hard work because you only have a small room to work with but, its doable. If you really really love something you have to do something to save it rather than starting from scratch again. After pruning your tree try to bend down the young pliable branches that grew from the stumps by tying them with bricks to almost horizontal. Its also one way of controlling their excessive vertical growth called apical dominance. This way they will be easier to harvest and prune next time. I have done that in some of my trees with great success. Another method is to tie the pliable immature branches to a peg in the ground until almost horizontal. Happy gardening.
About the Author
Fruitylicious1
TAMWORTH,2340,NSW
2nd November 2017 8:09pm
#UserID: 16885
Posts: 709
View All Fruitylicious1's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(1) LIKE this Question (0)
People who Like this Answer: Jacelyn
Jacelyn says...
Thank you so much for your reply! At least I know there is hope it can be saved, and also thank you especially for the tip regarding controlling its vertical growth. I will definitely give that a go. After the 2nd year I had all but given up with pruning, because every time I would cut one branch, 3 more would rise to take its place and it was just becoming more and more work to keep it contained (I also sometimes call it my hydra tree!).

Thank you again for your advice :)
About the Author
Jacelyn
NOLLAMARA
3rd November 2017 1:57pm
#UserID: 2336
Posts: 21
View All Jacelyn's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
allybanana says...
Hi Jacelyn

Instead of concrete blocks you could try thick plastic maybe sheets of roofing poly-carbonate as a barrier. Bending branches down is a great idea if they start low enough. I prune my mulberry twice a year to keep the tree small and fruit low. The first prune is done when the first fruit finish, I take off the top and thin rather than hedge the remaining branches allowing light penetration to lower branches. I still leave, this prune stimulates new growth and a second crop. The second prune I do early Autumn when the second crop finishes. I cut off the top again, then focus on thinning the remaining branches to let light down to the lower branches, if the leaves stay on for another couple of months the bottom branches get enough light to fatten the buds before leaf fall. If I forget the second prune I get minimal low fruit and lots of the low fruiting twigs die.
About the Author
allybanana
EDEN, NSW
7th November 2017 8:40pm
#UserID: 4544
Posts: 370
View All allybanana's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(1) LIKE this Question (0)
People who Like this Answer: Jacelyn

Original Post was last edited: 7th November 2017 8:50pm
Jacelyn says...
Thanks!! I had suspected that my tree fruited twice, it's good to have that confirmed, and thanks for the tips re letting light penetration through - this very much explains why the inner branches didn't fruit as much as the outer this season. I also like the roofing polycarbonate idea, as it might be much lighter to carry than concrete!
About the Author
Jacelyn
NOLLAMARA
8th November 2017 3:23pm
#UserID: 2336
Posts: 21
View All Jacelyn's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
allybanana says...
Hi Jacelyn

Here is an example of low Mulberry fruit and my son Benny picking them.
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1

Picture: 2

Picture: 3
About the Author
allybanana
EDEN, NSW
12th November 2017 10:07pm
#UserID: 4544
Posts: 370
View All allybanana's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Jacelyn says...
Oh WOW!! Your berries look amazing!! (and your gorgeous little boy - LOVE the sheer bliss on his face =D)

I have started trying to take off the higher branches that are coming up vertically on my tree as I can't reach the berries on them anyway. I filled one green bin yesterday, and as you can see, it doesn't even look like I've done anything, eep.
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1
  
About the Author
Jacelyn
NOLLAMARA
13th November 2017 12:55pm
#UserID: 2336
Posts: 21
View All Jacelyn's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)

REPLY to this forum

Login or Create Account

<< Back to Daleys Fruit Tree Forum