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Davidson's Plum

    43 responses

Phil@Tyalgum starts with ...
Can anyone help with a good recipe for Davidson Plum jam or jelly? I had a windfall of fruit today and would like to give them a go, the fruit are large, about the size of an Angelina or Victoria plum.
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phil@tyalgum
Murwillumbah
20th August 2010 9:52pm
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Tom says...
Hi Phil,
I hope you donít mind a recipe from far away and with a Caribbean twist. Our Davidson Plums are too young still to produce, but Iíve got this recipe just waiting for the first harvest day. Itís one of the reasons we planted them in the first place. I suspect, from all Iíve read about your native plums, that they have enough pectin in them to make a paste, like Membrillo (quince) or Guayabate (guava). If so, this recipe will produce the basis of a very fine hors-díúuvre. If not, it's probably not worth trying.

Iíll try to convert imperial units into metric, but forgive me if I miss it exactly.

Ingredients

4 pounds (1.8kg) fruit, washed, peeled, seeded, roughly chopped
1 vanilla pod, split
4 Key Limes (youíll use the rind as well as the juice, so washed, cut in half, squeezed, and cut out as much of the white pith as possible)
About 4 cups (I think thatís about 900 grams) granulated sugar Ė exact amount will be determined during cooking Ė we use the large crystal brown kind prevalent around the Gulf of Mexico, but I think any kind will do.

Method

1 Place plum pieces in a large saucepan (6-8 quarts / about 8 litres) and cover with water. Add the vanilla pod and squeezed lime halves and bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer, cover, and let cook until the plum pieces are fork tender (20-30 minutes).
2 Strain the water and discard the vanilla pod but keep the lime peel with the fruit. Purťe the plum pieces and lime rind in a food processor or blender. Measure the purťe, and add an equal amount of sugar. Return the purťe to the large pan. Heat to medium-low. Add the sugar. Stir with a wooden spoon until the sugar has completely dissolved. Add the lime juice.
3 Continue to cook over a low heat, stirring occasionally, for 1-1 1/2 hours, until the paste is very thick.
4 Preheat oven to a low 125įF (52įC). Line a 8Ēx8Ē (20cm≤) baking pan with parchment paper (donít use wax paper, itíll melt!). Grease the parchment paper with a thin coating of butter. Pour the cooked paste into the parchment paper-lined baking pan. Smooth out the top of the paste so itís even. Place in the oven for about an hour to help it dry. Remove from oven and let cool.
To serve, cut into squares or wedges and present with Manchego cheese. (We substitute goatís cheese or Camembert here because sheepís cheese is so hard to find and costs a bundle, but Iíll bet you have better access to it than we do.) To serve, take a small slice of the paste and spread it on top of a slice of the cheese on a cracker. Store by wrapping in foil, plastic wrap, or a tighted-sealed container and keep in the refrigerator.

Good luck,
Tom
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Tom
Orlando, Florida
21st August 2010 2:13am
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Phil@Tyalgum says...
Thanks Tom - I like the idea of the vanilla pod being added. I imagine you can grow that easily, vanilla being a Florida native. Will have to source a piece of that orchid for future use. I'm surprised at the size of the Davidson's plums, as big as any good European varieties, and a good rich color. Will boil them up tonight while watching the Australian Election. Phil.
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phil@tyalgum
Murwillumbah
21st August 2010 9:00am
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Tom says...
We're anticipating your election results will be available by the time we wake up tomorrow (our SAT morning) and have an interest in them as well.

I've never actually tried growing vanilla myself because the good stuff from Mexico is so readily available and not too expensive. Maybe we'll give it a shot just for the time when we can try the davidson plum paste recipe too. By the way, I've followed this recipe with Euro plums (extremely high in pectin, those), and it was perfection.
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Tom
Orlando, Florida
21st August 2010 11:05am
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amanda says...
Hey Tom - I'd lay a bet on a hung parliment (my tip for the day!) I love plum jam - so thanks for the recipe too!
Have u spent time over this way?
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
21st August 2010 11:09am
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amanda says...
Tom - sounds like u should do a botanical tour of Australia!

I really don't know about a hung parliament? - I imagine we get to go back and do it all again... :(

Anyway - it's always nice to hear from u too - better give the topic back now I guess...

I spent a bit of time in Far North QLD and there were a lot of these fruits where we bush walked - but I always went the opposite way to the tree as the Cassowary's terrified me there! I always carried a pop up umbrella just in case! :))
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
21st August 2010 8:23pm
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Tom says...
Say Phil, I saw in your edible plants that you have Burdekin Plum trees, and I'm wondering about those now. Wayne identified some seeds we got (not what we were after, which was more Davidson Plum seeds) as Burdekins. Looks like they're mostly a big stone with a thin layer of fruit wrapped around them from what I can tell on-line. Is that accurate? If there's more fruit on them, they also might make a good plum membrillo.

In any event, since we have the seeds, we're going to sow them to see what happens.

By the way, Amanda, I've been watching your ABC news live results. Looks like you were right and you're headed for a hung parliament, eh?
Tom
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Tom
Orlando, Florida
21st August 2010 10:44pm
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Phil@Tyalgum says...
My trees are very young Tom, so haven't seen the fruit as yet, but here is a pic from Google Images.
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phil@tyalgum
Murwillumbah
21st August 2010 10:50pm
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Phil@Tyalgum says...
The seeds I took from the Davidson plum were more like a star shape, see pic.
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phil@tyalgum
Murwillumbah
21st August 2010 10:55pm
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Tom says...
Yep - those are the two types of seeds we've gotten. The Davidsons love Central Florida, BTW, and are growing swiftly; we'll see about the Burdekins. I'm just not sure about the Burdekin fruit being much yet. Thanks for checking it out!
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Tom
Orlando, Florida
21st August 2010 11:46pm
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Wayne says...
You are right about the thin layer of flesh over the seed of the Burdekin Plum Tom, they grow wild up here and you need to be reeeeaaal!! hungry before you would eat them.

Good call on the election Amanda
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Wayne
Mackay QLD
22nd August 2010 11:36am
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amanda says...
Hey Tom - I see that capulin cherries grow around your area - have u eaten many and if so - what do u think of them? Do they taste ok - or are they resinous?
I have one that I was thinking of taking cuttings of when we move...but I am not hearing great reports about them...

Hey Wayne - QLD sure gave it to Ms Gillard hey?! Bit of a dog's breakfast this election.
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
22nd August 2010 8:02pm
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Tom says...
Sorry Amanda, I don't know that fruit. I checked a few Florida nurseries' online sites and found none carrying it. From the descriptions I saw, it seems it likes dryer places - Like California and Western Mexico - more than it would wet Florida. They must love WA then, eh? Do they grow in wet QLD?

What's a dog's breakfast? (Maybe I should get an English-to-English dictionary?) A shame you're moving away from all that you've established in your good gardens. Are you leaving Geraldton?
t
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Tom
Orlando, Florida
22nd August 2010 10:18pm
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Charles cant spell says...
A dogs breakfast is a shit fight :)
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Charlesstillcantspell1
Perth Innaloo
22nd August 2010 11:09pm
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Tom says...
There ya go - translated into UhMURkin English (ŗ la George W Bush) for me! Got a good outloud laugh on that one - thanks Charles c s.

In that case, we'll probably have a dog's breakfast too in NOV.
t
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Tom
Orlando, Florida
22nd August 2010 11:48pm
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Original Post was last edited: 22nd August 2010 11:49pm
amanda says...
Hiya Tom...trikus or Rev would know if u can grow them there...it may be possible - they are called the "tropical" cherry.
I thought Dog's breakfast meant a "bloody mess"...!
(I wasn't born in Aust (grandparents were tho') but I love the colourful expressions of the Aussie language...I wonder if it comes from their Irish heritage - which is very lyrical)

Anyway - yes are leaving Gero' - going south for more rain, less heat and wind.
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
23rd August 2010 10:38am
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Tom says...
Would like to know if those tropical cherries grow in Rev's and trikus' neighbourhood - then I'd know that they'll grow here. If either of you are monitoring, please let me know.

By the way, Phil, back on topic of D. Plum recipes, there sure are a lot of them available just through googling it. If you didn't want to make a paste like in my recipe, I'm sure you'll find lots of other ideas.

Well, Amanda, speaking as someone from a hot but rainy climate, I can only say sounds like you're making a good choice. I love the daily downpour as much as the plants - hope you will too.
All the best!
t
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Tom
Orlando, Florida
23rd August 2010 11:04am
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Tom says...
Hi Phil, since you have so many Davidson Plums this year, how 'bout a seed swap sometime after you gather a bunch? I have these things currently or will soon as we pull fruit or seed pods. If you're interested in any of them and know that AQIS will let them in, I'll happily send you some seeds.

American persimmon (Diospyros virginiana),
Japanese wisteria (Wisteria floribunda - ours grew from seeds from Parc Andrť CitroŽn in Paris),
Chinese wisteria (Wisteria sinensis - from seeds from Giardini Pubblici Venice),
American Wisteria (Wisteria frutescens - from seeds from Central Park NYC),
Dwarf pomegranate (Punica granatum 'Nana') - these are hard to get a sprout, but we get one every now and then,
Blue Passionfruit (Passiflora caerulea),
Purple Passionfruit (P. edulis),
Lilikoi Passionfruit (P. edulis var. Flavicam),
Cattley (Strawberry) Guava (Psidium cattleianum),
Pink Tabebuia (Tabebuia heterophylla),
and I may be able to scrounge a few seeds from our Southern Magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora) whose cones I've been running over with the mower lately.
Cheers,
Tom
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Tom
Orlando, Florida
25th August 2010 10:21am
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Original Post was last edited: 25th August 2010 10:23am
Phil@Tyalgum says...
Sounds good Tom - would be happy to send you some fresh seed. I'd love some Diospyros and P. caerulea if you have any spare, what quantity of Davidsonia would you like? Phil.
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phil@tyalgum
Murwillumbah
25th August 2010 11:45am
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Tom says...
Thanks, Phil. I'll send the caerula over the weekend - they always set seed and grow quickly - a good one, especially with your Spring coming on shortly. It'll be about three or four weeks before I pull the fist Diospyros (unless a couple fall early). They're yours as soon as we pick 'em.

As for Davidsonia, I'm a newbie. Ours are still all too young to know what they are and how they differ; I think we may be the only folks who even have the plants within hundreds of miles. So there's not an easy way to "test" them. Aren't they mostly sour with sweet being the rare variant? In any event, I'll happily sow whatever you recommend.

You can send me a note at tjhuggett@aol.com to tell me where to mail them.
Tom
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Tom
Orlando, Florida
25th August 2010 9:40pm
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Original Post was last edited: 26th August 2010 2:04am
Tom says...
Oops, sorry, Phil, my Dyslexia kicked in, and I read "quantity" as "quality". (That stumped me 'cause I hadn't thought that there might be some such difference, and I interpreted it as either "sour" or "sweet". Thus the ramble on about that which must have seemed strange to you.)

As to quantity, just a few, thanks - just what would fit in a standard letter envelope without bloating it or driving up the postage. Besides, I expect it's going to be much easier for me to get cleaned seeds from the passion fruit and persimmons that it might be for you from the plums just due to the way they're put together.
t
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Tom
Orlando, Florida
26th August 2010 2:12am
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Original Post was last edited: 26th August 2010 6:00am
Rev says...
hey tom
if clean and labelled all those species will clear aqis/

ill have to let you know
hopefully heading sth to examine my experiment in sept/oct


also davidsonia is meant to be sour and inedible. thats the norm in australia - as paul recher says - we have no primates!
BUT - stew it with sugar and the full depth of its goodness comes out
its better than any foreign plum ive tried here.
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Rev
North qld
26th August 2010 8:18pm
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Rev says...
btw davidson plums are about the sae size as persimmon seeds give or take fluffiness.
i know because i used to buy in persommon and lotus plum seed by the 100
i hope some struck in inland Northern NSW
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Rev
North qld
26th August 2010 8:22pm
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Rev says...
sorry i havent read the post
but i read the question
\
the old gals say ist basically equal parts sugar and fruit
with all good jams

now in Australia a 'jam' can be a lower conc of fruit while a conserve is 40% plus????

but my wonderful old girls would stick to the 50"50 rule and its was wonderful!

if you want old school traditioanl preserves, and a few with a modern flair
try
www.louisas.com.au
they are a company that employs persosns with diasabilities and offere real quality of life, and also a quality of product. Their strength areas i feel are the preserves.
The sweet mustard pickle, the chilli sauce, sweet chilli, the chutney, teh tomato chill jam - whic is great on bbq goods! not just as a jam.
try them out and give them feedback, they are great people for a great cause.

R
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Rev
North qld
26th August 2010 8:29pm
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amanda says...
Rev - do u think Tom can grow capulins in Florida? He asked above...
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
26th August 2010 8:50pm
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Rev says...
i think probably yes
he could prob get better stock than us too
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Rev
North qld
29th August 2010 7:47pm
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Tom says...
Thanks for checking, Rev, and for asking, Amanda.

So I went checking again to see where these are available. Let's just say, Amanda, that I won't be the one who answers your question "Do they taste ok?" any time soon if ever. I couldn't even find a site which listed seed for them; and all my favorite nearby tropical fruit suppliers don't have them. Must be a reason even though, as you both say, they do appear to be able to do well here. Now, it'll become a mission to get one just because they're so elusive here!
t
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Tom
Orlando, Florida
29th August 2010 10:35pm
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Original Post was last edited: 30th August 2010 1:22am
amanda says...
Hi Tom, the scientific name is Prunus salicifolia - if it's any help. In Susanna Lyles book she states they are a native of southern North America and into Mexico..? also - extensively naturalised in Central America and much of Western South America...grown to a limited extent in NZ, California and Florida.
Maybe it has a different common name over there.
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
30th August 2010 9:50am
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Tom says...
Hey - you're up early, eh? Well, I suppose that's typ since it's MON now on your side. Yep, that's what I checked, but I promise no good results over here. I've noticed a few other Floridians check in on this forum sometimes - any of y'all grow or know Capulin Cherres and could answer Amanda's question? I'm stumped (no offense to Ms. Lyle.)
t
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Tom
Orlando, Florida
30th August 2010 10:31am
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amanda says...
Hey Tom - just on the subject of Wisteria (as I see u have a few)...I have a japanese mauve double bloom - it starts off looking good in spring but then gradually deteriorates.

I am thinking it is maybe too hot and dry for it here? The summer easterly is like a blast furnace when it's over 40 degrees C - no humidity at all.
It is on reticulation - but I am thinking it may need summer shade and humidity to do well? How do yours cope with your humidity? thanks!
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
31st August 2010 9:27am
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Tom says...
Hi! I was wondering where you were. You know, I never thought our wisterias would really ever do well enough to bloom here since the seeds were gathered in cold places. But the vines have flourished in our heat and humidity, and this year (with a little colder push than usual last FEB) they popped lots of flowers. Our plants get more rain water than their parent plants in their respective homes, itís just warm water compared to cold or the frozen type. I think youíre right, though, that your spot in WA is too hot and harsh for any wisteria I know to be really happy and responsive even if you irrigated them well. I donít think wisterias flourish in our Southwest, for comparison (though they probably donít get the winds like you get). Maybe bougainvillas would be a good substitute? Are you taking the wisteria south with when you move? Itíd probably appreciate it. (Iíd be happy to send you some seeds at your new place if you want to start some new there.)
t
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Tom
Orlando, Florida
31st August 2010 10:19pm
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amanda says...
Hey Tom - thank you for your kind offer but I will dig it up I think - it will just get bulldozed in the long run :(

I see your email there though - will keep it handy just in case if that's ok? I am trying not to buy any plants now (as we are moving) - but it's so hard to deny my addiction! :)))

But yes - I have lots of "Bougies" actually - are they as popular over there as here? We seem to have 100's of varieties! My favourite is "Smartie Pants".

Anyway Tom - as u seem to like flowers - I am going to change the photo for u - it's one of my grevillias....flowers all year round - bee heaven :)
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
31st August 2010 10:52pm
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Tom says...
I've never heard of a grevillia, but it's certainly outstanding! Looks like it grows on a rosemary or florida mint shrub. Are you taking that one with you when you move as well? How are you going to move all you've got?

Sounds like you and I have the same afflication - just yesterday I bought an Emperor Lychee even though I'll have to figure out how to accommodate it still. But, you know, the other Lychee needed a mate for cross polination, and it was a good deal, and there was nothing else in the back of the wagon to prevent me from putting it in the car.

Yes, please keep the email handy - I'll always happily send you (and anyone else on the forum) seeds from our side when they're available and if you know that they'll clear AQIS.

As far 'Bougies' - we're about the same - they do exeedingly well here, and there are more varieties than I could ever count. They don't bloom well in the humid Summer, but they're brilliant throughout the Winter.

It's a bit odd to see the date change on this post to 01 SEP as while I'm writing, we're still in AUG.
t
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Tom
Orlando, Florida
1st September 2010 2:35am
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amanda says...
No Tom - unfortunately natives don't like being dug up at all. Have never heard of an Emporer Lychee!? It seems there are some great choices of varieties of fruit trees in the US.

(PS: Grevillias are an amazing group of natives - from huge silky oak trees down to small groundcovers - all with the most incredible flowers I have ever seen in a genus of plants. You really should do that botanical tour one day Tom :)
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
1st September 2010 9:35am
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Tom says...
Amanda, you're a Temptress! There's no place I'd like to come back to for a real stay than your beautiful country. Work & $$ will keep me home for a long while, though.

I've been googling grevillias since you introduced them to me, and it seems we have very limited access to them. You know, in a way that suits me - that not everything should be available everywhere. Maybe that'll be what draws me back to Oz eventually, eh?

As for Emperor Lychees, I'm as surprised that you don't know them as you were that I didn't know Capulin Cherries. It's a slower gowing, smaller size tree with big fruits and little seeds. (It's perfect for the ever-decreasing space on our property - or so I've reasoned in order to
justify getting it.)

All the best!
t
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Tom
Orlando, Florida
2nd September 2010 2:32am
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Original Post was last edited: 2nd September 2010 2:33am
amanda says...
Hey they look good Tom - can't wait for my tree to grow up.
(PS - Grev's generally like hot, dry and sandy!)
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
2nd September 2010 9:38am
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BJ says...
I believe we do have Emporor Lychees, just under a different name - Chacapat or something like that. It does sound like a good one, as does the Sweetheart, which Im not sure we have here? As for Dwarf Lychees, the more readily available one is a Wai Chi (Mine is covered in flowers right now).

Back on the Davidson's Plum - Of my three I can give a bit of an update on their behaviour

Davidsonia puriens - It has grown tall, single trunk, 4ft, no sign of flowers (although it did have a bit of a setback during winter while I was away on holiday)

v Jerseyana - 1.5ft, lots of new growth, but mostly branching. Lots of tiny red flowers. (younger than 1st tree)

v Johnsonii - Looks like a cross between D plum and Atherton Raspberry. Slower growing - slightly under 1ft, a few tiny bright red flowers.
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Theposterformerlyknownas
Brisbane
2nd September 2010 10:05am
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Original Post was last edited: 2nd September 2010 10:55am
Tom says...
Should the pruriens species be called Ooray (and only the pruriens)? I googled Ooray and found a site www.ooray.com.au/) that said Ooray's are incorrectly called Davidson's Plum - that the English name really means the jerseyana species. Do y'all agree?

Thanks too for the info, BJ. I like hearing how others are doing with these interesting plants, especially when they flower.
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Tom
Orlando, Florida
2nd September 2010 10:48am
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Gerard says...
The term Ooray definitely refers to the tropical variety Davidsonia pruriens.
This was the first species described.
The indigenous names for the southern varieties have not been recorded.
The term Ooray has always been used to identify Davidsonia pruriens.
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Gerard
North Queensland
5th October 2010 7:08pm
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Tom says...
Thanks, Gerard! Calling them by their indigenous name makes them all the more enticing to us foreigners.
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Tom
Orlando, Florida
7th October 2010 2:31pm
#UserID: 3912
Posts: 101
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Gerard says...
Ooray are easy to germinate and fast growing in the wet tropics. Only one of the two seeds is usually viable. They are also not endangered as are the related species.

Some people describe the taste as tart but I enjoy the juice with just a little water so that it is not too thick.
I get a disappointed when people feel that fruit needs to be sweet to appeal to the pallet.

Not all of us have an unadventurous range of tastes we like to enjoy.

Check out https://rirdc.infoservices.com.au/downloads/09-133.pdf
to find out more about the phenomenal health benefits of Ooray.
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Gerard
North Queensland
8th October 2010 6:29pm
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Tom says...
Are Quandongs and Burdekin Plums the same fruit just with different names? Thanks for the reference link, Gerard - that was very interesting; and I hadn't run across that one in the research about Oorays. Brings up something else I was wondering about, and the picture of Quandongs in the reference reminded me to ask the question about them and Burdekins.
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Tom
Orlando, Florida
10th October 2010 2:14am
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Jantina says...
Hi Tom, Quandongs and Burdikin Plums are two completely different plants.
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10th October 2010 8:54am
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BJ says...
Quandongs are a desert tree. Eumundi or Blue Quandongs (or Blue Fig) are a rainforest tree with small blue fruit with a large, hard seed. Burdekin Plums are like little purple-black pumpkins, closely related to Mango trees. I planted one each (more) of these on the edge of my father's rainforest patch today.
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Theposterformerlyknownas
Brisbane
10th October 2010 8:50pm
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