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Bramley Cooking apples

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Sunnygal starts with ...
Is there anywhere I can get a Bramley Cooking apple tree and will it grow in Queensland?

Thanks
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Sunnygal
Sunshine Coast
29th January 2015 7:39pm
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Brain says...
Can be purchased from tassie. Not sure if it will fruit in qld, as apples are considered a temperate climate plant, but some apples can be grown, but not reliably. It may also need a second var of apple as pollinator. Its worth a try if you are very keen.

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Brain
Brisbane
31st January 2015 2:00am
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Diana says...
I have the kuffle creek book that says bramley is one of the good ones (but be aware it is triploid). I got lots of my apples from Woodbridge http://www.woodbridgefruittrees.com.au/wft/. They are going well and fruit (not just the tropical ones).

Applenut says 'Bramley England, 1800 Bramley is the national cooking apple of England and many will find it odd for it to be on this list, but it has proven to be very reliable in a tropic climate. It is very vigorous (the original 200-year-old tree is still growing and bearing apples in Nottingham) and annual bearing. It is quite tart until completely ripe and makes an applesauce that will about blow your head off with an intense flavor. For an apple from such a cool climate it sure is not bothered by the heat any, tolerating 45 C. with no problems.'

Re warm climate apples: See post from applenut in the 'pinkabelle apple' thread, e.g.

Applenut says...
Just stumbled upon your forum, and great questions here; I wanted to clear up some questions about winter chill.

I grow about 100 varieties of apples in Inland Southern California in the USA where we have very hot summers and warm winters, averaging about 200 hours of chill; citrus is the main crop in the area, but we also grow avocados, bananas, and other sub-tropicals. My nursery specializes in growing apple trees in hot climates and the tropics, and we ship to the African tropic lowlands. We have re-imported apple varieties from the Grove Research Station in Tasmania that originated in the USA in the nineteenth century, but are now extict from cultivation here.

Chilling hours for apples will affect it's behavior and timing, but any apple will fruit here. Blossoming will be delayed or extended, but the trees do bear a full load of fruit by the end of the season which extends months past the normal apple season in cold climates. We start out harvesting Anna and Dorsett Golden in June and wrap up with Lady Williams in February, after Anna is already blossoming again. We have grown many apples considered "high chill" such as Northern Spy, Winesap, Honeycrisp, Red Delicious, Arkansas Black, and Gravenstein.

Do not let someone tell you that apples will not grow in your area until you actually try it. We heard that for years here in Southern California until somebody who didn't know better actually planted them, and got a ton of apples. Now the quality may not be as good on some varieties, but we've found plenty that are as good or better than when grown in a cold climate.

Having a pollinator can affect the fruit quality; Anna is tall and skinny unless pollinated with Dorsett Golden, and the seeds will just be little specks. But when pollinated they get nice and fat, as does Dorsett. However, they blossom months before our Pink Lady does and will not pollinate it.

You can see a list of 20 of our favorite apples in a hot climate at http://www.kuffelcreek.com/favorites.htm
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Diana
Brisbane
31st January 2015 8:56am
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Original Post was last edited: 31st January 2015 8:55am
Brain says...
Very good research diana, what apples do you grow? And have you found any troubles with fruit flies and possums in brizvegas?
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Brain
Brisbane
1st February 2015 12:56am
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Diana says...
Hi Brain,

Thanks.
You have to net them like tomatoes. We have no possums here.

granny smith- not that productive
anna- very productive
pink lady- moderately productive
rome beauty- very productive
golden dorsett- very productive
huonville crab- very productive

Also more recently planted, still small:
sundowner
bonza
gravenstein
king david
dr hogg
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1
  
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Diana
Brisbane
1st February 2015 6:53pm
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Diana says...
That picture is some Rome Beauty apples now (they ripen in May)
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Diana
Brisbane
1st February 2015 6:56pm
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Brain says...
I would also agree that pink lady isnt all that great in brisbane climate. Anna flowers a lot but i did not quite like the taste. I think you will find sundowner does very well.

I also have fuji, red delic and gala, all doing great.

I am tempted to branch out and get some pears and even a sloe.

What type of netting have you got and where from?
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Brain
Brisbane
1st February 2015 10:22pm
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Diana says...
Hi Brain,

I use the sleeves and large bags from Green Harvest (and tomato bags when I run out of the mesh ones, but mesh is better for apples). It works really well except for the one time rats chewed a hole in some- usually we don't have that problem. The bags last for years. https://www.greenharvest.com.au/
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Diana
Brisbane
3rd February 2015 8:54am
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Slicko says...
Hi Diana,
The bags in your pic don't appear to be the Greenharvest bags that I have been using, so I am wondering about their origin. They appear to be some sort of open woven net.
I put in two apples a month or so but I had no idea that some of the more temperate varieties could be grown around here. Do you know if high chill varieties can be grafted onto low chill trees and still fruit successfully in our climate?
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Slicko
Carindale
3rd February 2015 3:32pm
#UserID: 1775
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Diana says...
Slicko- look up applenut's posts, and buy his book if you are really keen. it is not as simple as 'high chill' and 'low chill' with apples (it is with stonefruit though). He has tested a lot and thinks they all fruit but some are not as productive and don't taste nice in warm climates.

I don't understand you're point about the green harvest exclusion products.
http://greenharvest.com.au/PestControlOrganic/ExclusionProducts.html#MeshSleeve
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Diana
Brisbane
3rd February 2015 7:35pm
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Brain says...
Thanks diana for your advice, would defn check out the bags.

You should be able to graft apples, the only catch is, you will likely to have a rootstock and an intermediate (existing scion) and the new scion. So the new combination might generate interesting results. Its worth a try for sure.

Or wait for a shoot below the graft.

As for fruiting, it can be hit and miss. But it would appear most apples can fruit in the subtropics, can being the key word here.
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Brain
Brisbane
3rd February 2015 10:31pm
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jakfruit etiquette says...
In Citrus different rootstocks can alter peel thickness, fruit sweetness/ acid ratio and ripening times, and deciduous rootstocks such as trifoliata and flying dragon can induce lateness/dormancy.

"Do you know if high chill Apple varieties can be grafted onto low chill trees and still fruit successfully in our climate?"
I'm thinking that it might be a stretch to get that happening. Not sure if other stresses can induce apple flowering.
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jakfruit etiquette
vic
4th February 2015 8:44am
#UserID: 5133
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Slicko says...
Thanks for that info Jakfruit. Up here my limited experience is with citrus and low chill stone fruit together with some of the more standard tropical trees like longan and star apple. The pomme fruit have never entered my mind until I started to read some of the forum posts as I had always assumed that they were high chill and only an option around Stanthorpe, so it opens up a whole new world for me.
I followed your advice Diana and read Applenut's posts and took in his web site. It is quite amazing what he has growing in what I suspect a similar climate to ours and where he is sending his apples to. Also followed your link to the greenharvest net bags. I thought that your bags may have been made from some sort of fabric like mosquito net, but I know differently now.
Thanks everyone for your thought provoking posts.
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Slicko
Carindale
4th February 2015 12:28pm
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Diana says...
Thanks. The green harvest bags are like soft mosquito mesh for screen doors and windows- the nylon rather than metal mesh.
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Diana
Brisbane
5th February 2015 8:50pm
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Janet harlow says...
I live in Kinglake West Vic. I’m from the UK originally and miss the Bramley Apples. I was wondering if it is possible to buy a tree to plant in our garden.
Thanking you
Janet
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Janet harlow
Kinglake West
14th December 2017 10:39am
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HansP says...
Hi Janet,
yeah, you should be able to buy a Bramleys Seedling apple tree in Victoria. I am not far from you and I have one. You could try Pete the Permie, and you could try Edible Forest gardens, and you might also try Bulleen Art And Garden

http://www.petethepermie.com
https://www.facebook.com/edibleforestgardensoz/
http://www.baag.com.au

call around and see who has one or who can get one for you.
If you can't get that to work you are welcome to a cutting from mine, and I can even graft it onto any apple tree for you (during winter) if you don't want to do it yourself.
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HansP
Nth Warrandyte
15th December 2017 9:19pm
#UserID: 17532
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Fruitylicious1 says...
Hi Janet
Definitely you can successfully plant Bramleys seedling cooking apple in kinglake Victoria. Some of the nurseries that stock them are; woodbridge nursery in Tasmania, Heritage fruit trees in Ballarat Victoria and Yalca nursery also in Victoria. They will start taking orders though by April 2018 next year.
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Fruitylicious1
TAMWORTH,2340,NSW
16th December 2017 6:42am
#UserID: 16885
Posts: 119
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Original Post was last edited: 16th December 2017 6:42am

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