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Keriberry

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Kenzie starts with ...
Would anyone know if the keriberry could be grown in a large pot to stop it spreading? Thanks for your help.
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Kenzie
South Nanango
8th February 2016 4:31pm
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denise1 says...
I would dig a hole about 2 meters wide with straight sides then line the sides with strong plastic sheet or similar, then fill back with the soil. It would then be at ground level and the roots/ runners would be retained. Maybe the sides should be about 70cms deep.
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denise1
auckland NZ
11th February 2016 8:05am
#UserID: 6832
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berrymaniac says...
I have been experimenting with Keriberries in cold climate for several years now. I think I have planted about 5 in various locations but the only survivor was the one I planted in full summer sun in the worst spot in my yard. It thrives but shows very few signs of spreading and when it does so it's usually by tip rooting which is easily controlled and has the benefit of producing new plants. The lousy thing is that the fruit bear no resemblance at all to the whoppers one sees from time to time in the supermarkets. The fruiting buds are prolific but the fruit when it does set and ripen tends to be no bigger than a small wild blackberry fruit. It's tasty enough but not much more so than a blackberry. I think the fear of uncontrolled spread is a furphy. From what I read on the net it will spread prolifically if not managed and where it did become a pest in WA it was in a riparian position...it likes creek banks...pretty much like wild blackberry and also can be controlled by the same chemicals. If you are growing the things in your garden they will be easily controlled. They are also heavy drinkers and need a lot of water..as they tend to wilt fairly easily in direct sun. I don't know but suspect that the plants on the market on ebay and from nurseries are not the same as those grown commercially as the difference in fruit size is huge. Commercial keriberries are up to 40 or 50mm long and elongated. the fruit I am getting despite careful feeding and watering are as I said a disappointingly small size. I would like to see photos of fruit from the parent plant that Daley's are using for propagation. For the record the plant copes easily with minus five degrees and heavy frosts in winter....no issues at all.
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Berrymaniac
ACT
28th June 2017 6:25pm
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Original Post was last edited: 28th June 2017 6:27pm
denise1 says...
I believe that the keriberries were so named because they are common in some areas near kerikeri in New Zealand. They occur mainly where they are spread along unsealed stone roads by maintenance machinery, mainly road graders. I plan a visit to try and find some superior fruiting specimens this coming summer. I have seen them twice , that were far from kerikeri, but with poor fruit. I dont know if there is a way of making them fruit better.I prize the fruit of the japanese wineberry that can be easily coaxed to give a very thick crop of good quality fruit from virtually every seedling. It is Rubus phoenicolasius
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denise1
auckland NZ
4th July 2017 7:29pm
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Berrymaniac says...
Keriberries originated in Southern Asia not NZ. They may well have come to us via NZ but at some point they would have been introduced to NZ. They are farmed here commercially and the product is quite a large berry. There have been issues with spreading in the Margaret River area in WA which led to the invasive weed alert. As I understand it that infestation was along creek banks an environment that suits other bramble type berries. Digging large holes and installing root barriers is absolute overkill in relation to this plant in domestic cultivation. In the cold temperate climate here in Canberra it is way less invasive than raspberry plants and only marginally more vigorous. A friend on the mid north coast of NSW reports similar behaviour from his keriberry plants. In terms of coaxing them to produce better fruit I don't believe that the plants I bought from Daleys are a commercial cultivar. If that's not the case cultivation notes and pics of fruit from the parent planting would be appreciated.
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Berrymaniac
GOWRIE
5th July 2017 9:19am
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