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Late season mangoes in warm temperate climates

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Amanda starts with ...
Sorry to start yet another thread on mangoes but I couldn't find a thread that specifically addresses this tricky issue?
I am really keen to hear how others manage their late season mangoes in the lower latitudes - both pruning and feeding.
For eg: we have Mahachanook/King Thai (Bunbury WA) and I only harvested the last fruits barely 1 month ago. Now the tree is flowering again - with no chance to prune and/or encourage new growth?
These flowers are a waste of time of course - as it's winter wet and cold here - so they won't set fruit.
This tree keeps flowering for the next 3-4months now - until it sets fruit. (must be exhausting for it?!)

Will I have to settle for biennial fruiting on this tree perhaps?
ie: cut all the flowers off every second season and then feed in late spring to encourage new growth...
or - cut all the flowers off until late winter and then take a reduced harvest from those secondary lateral flowering stems?


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Amanda
LESCHENAULT,6233,WA
10th June 2019 9:50pm
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David01 says...
Hi Amanda,

It happened with my Nam Doc Mai. I have to cut off the flowers 2-3 times from April to July otherwise the tree will be exhausted but no fruits set. The links below may be the answer for your case. Cheers.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hWOlyvE-UP4
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David01
CRAIGIEBURN,3064,VIC
11th June 2019 9:32am
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denise1 says...
I had mango growing and fruiting in Auckland, NZ. They were in barrels or in ground against the north wall of house. The fruit ripens well into winter and because of the extended time and focused heat of sunshine they had a strong agreeable taste. It is probably easiest to allow fruiting every year and just thin them a bit. The trees didnt get any frost due to sheltered microclimate. Now in the far north they grow and fruit much easier.
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denise1
auckland NZ
11th June 2019 11:03am
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Mango Mike says...
Amanda.... You are correct in that if you let it continue to flower due to winter fruit won't set.... Growth on mango is due to full moon & mangoes will usually one month send more roots growth & the next month push leaf growth when not in flower or fruit stageor dormant winter stage.. I would remove the flower stems just before the full moon in June.... You will then have a chance of new flowers not coming until August/Sept. Then it may be hot enough in temps to set fruit..... If not just repeat the process..... Mike
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Mango Mike
KARRABIN,4306,QLD
11th June 2019 4:53pm
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Amanda says...
Thanks for the replies - very interesting and helpful. What about growth flushes and feeding between picking your last fruits and then the later flush of "planned"

flowers then?
Most of the references are for more ideal climates but this fertilising chart is probably a reasonable one for us warm temperate/mediterranean folks do you think?
(my mangoes and avocados definitely need some boron at this time of the year - as we experience heavy rainfall for the next 2 months and we have light sandy soils - so they get quite leached of boron here..plus I find the mahachanook sensitive to low boron levels anyway)

Anyway - I usually just give my trees a good handful of a very slow release organic manure pellet fert about now - to last them/the soil organisms until very late winter, when I gear everything up for spring?
Is that what you guys do too?

Do your mangoes flush with new growth after you cut off the flowers, now?
Does this use up their carbohydrate reserves do you think?

I have read a bit about the phenology stuff (pic included)- and realise that we are probably not going to be able to have our cake and eat it too, in our warm temperate and/or mediterranean climates - but maybe we can tweak some things?
(or - at least not until someone breeds a mango variety more suited for our locations..!)
Or am I being over ambitious maybe?




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Amanda
LESCHENAULT,6233,WA
12th June 2019 1:37pm
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David01 says...
Hi Amanda,

The info you needed for your King thai is very specific to your own soil and climate, only few people in WA can answer correctly. However, if you can provide few facts from last year then I may be able to assist. For example:
1. Your King Thai had flowers in which month last year.
2. fruit set in which month
3. fruit harvest in which month
4. wet season in which month.
Cheers.
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David01
CRAIGIEBURN,3064,VIC
14th June 2019 10:17am
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Amanda says...
Hi David. I don't think I can remember very accurately :(
My best guesses are:
1. June - maybe July (but it's just started flowering now, 2019)
2. maybe November
3. April-May
4. wet months are reliably June/July & August.

Fruit set is a hard one as they set over a period of 2 months...it's quite staggered? Hence picking is a bit staggered also...

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Amanda
LESCHENAULT,6233,WA
17th June 2019 11:59am
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David01 says...
Hi Amanda,
Based on your info from flowers to fruit set took 2-4 months and to fruit harvest took 7-9 months that is a bit longer than expected. Last year if King Thai had flowers in June-July then I guess King Thai did not have many fruits set because of cold snap and wet season during winter time (June-August). I have 2 ideas as below if you find it is possible to improve your situation:
Solution 1.
Leave the flowers as it is but cover the tree with fabric/plastic/density shade cloth 3sqm for couple of months. You will need to install 4 posts to support the cover. Apply NPK 2:2:15 add Mg:1.2 S:8, Calcium and Zinc to ensure the tree is healthy to widthstand cold and wet weather much better. Also, Add Boron to ensure fruit set during this period. Remove the cover in Sept. This technique will have more fruits set and avoid black spot or anthracnose but it may not work if weather drops below 10C for long period as embryo death in the early stage and due to pollen viability reduces substantial. Another drawback is fruiting cycle is not changed so the tree needs to cover 2-3 months every year during winter time.
Solution 2:
As flowers initiate by cool night (around 12C) and dry condition after the second dormant when leaf flush matured which supposes happened 4-8 weeks after fruit harvest (April-May). The flowers cycle repeated in June-July same as last year. Usually in cold climate growers restrict water after fruit harvest for 1-2 months to delay the flowers but it is too late for your case. The other option is to remove 2/3 of flowers and expect the secondary flowers from axillary buds in a month or two i.e. August or September when the weather improves so more fruits set. Also, this technique will shift the whole cycle forwards 1-2 months for next season. The reason only removes 2/3 flowers as just in case if flowers do not re-shoot as plan then you still have some fruits on the terminal buds. Apply NPK 2:2:15 add Mg:1.2 S:8, Calcium and Zinc and Boron to ensure the tree is healthy. Boron needs to apply before the buds break to increase the chance of fruit set.
In both cases continue to apply NPK once a month from Sept to April. Prefer slow released fertiliser for sandy soil. For mature tree I prefer very low N to promote flowers and fruit quality. However, N higher but K lower at flush. The NPK figure can be modified to suit your soil and growth environment. Cheers

https://static1.squarespace.com/static/53b0ef57e4b04ed3debabc4f/t/588aaf711b631b40f0d0dff9/1485483898659/Mango+crop+nutrition.pdf
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David01
CRAIGIEBURN,3064,VIC
18th June 2019 1:49pm
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Original Post was last edited: 19th June 2019 9:22am
Amanda says...
Thanks for your reply David01 - that all makes sense to me and is very interesting. Thanks for taking the time for such a comprehensive reply.
I use big market umbrellas as shade in summer sometimes, which would work great - only trouble is they tend to blow away in winter storms...lol...
I think I will go for chopping the flowers hey....it's a bit more straight forward.
This particular variety flowers like crazy - it's quite different to the KP's and R2E2's we have.
If I cut off these flowers now then it will reflower straight away - and the weather doesn't improve until Sept?
I should maybe wait another month b4 cutting off the flowers perhaps?

We had such a mild summer this year and last spring was weird - most folks got very little stone fruit, pome fruit flowering - but on the other hand I got fabulous avocado, longon and Wampee flowers (all the sub tropicals)

This mild summer may have delayed the ripening of these mangoes?
The tree is only about 5yrs old (and 3m tall and 3m wide) so still young - hopefully I can get it into a better fruiting pattern...

It's a healthy tree as you can see. Not as impressive as what it would look like in a mroe tropical climate - but pretty good for my climate and in-ground...!? Very happy with it and will be planting another.

Thanks again!


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Amanda
LESCHENAULT,6233,WA
20th June 2019 11:07am
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