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tree ID.

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woll starts with ...
any idea what these s are ! edible or not ?
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woll
mackay
14th August 2017 12:08pm
#UserID: 16684
Posts: 2
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woll says...
tree growing near home. 1st time ive noticed fruit on it,tried checking on sites but cant find any info !
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1
  
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woll
mackay
14th August 2017 12:12pm
#UserID: 16684
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Manfred says...
I think it's a loquat.
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Manfred
Wamboin
15th August 2017 7:51pm
#UserID: 9565
Posts: 174
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Possum says...
Hi Woll can you supply a photo of the tree..
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Possum
LOGAN CENTRAL
15th August 2017 9:07pm
#UserID: 12212
Posts: 7
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Pademelon1 says...
Definitely not a loquat.

Is it a street tree, on someone's property or native?

Photos of flowers would help immensely.
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Pademelon1
PADDINGTON,2021,NSW
16th August 2017 10:23pm
#UserID: 11938
Posts: 100
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Original Post was last edited: 16th August 2017 10:24pm
Possum says...
Yes correct not a loquat. If a full photo can be supplied this will definitely clear it up.. the only species I can think of is the common name Golden penda which has big yellow bombom flowers the size of a fist. This species once flowering does have big clumps of seed pods like this. The only thing which is thrown me off is the leaves these look bigger.
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Possum
Logan Central QLD
17th August 2017 4:02pm
#UserID: 12212
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Manfred says...
I agree, I was wrong to suggest loquat. I had a look at my loquat and the leaves are quite different. Shape is OK but loquat leaves not glossy.
Sorry! (Hangs head in shame and slouches off.)
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Manfred
Wamboin
18th August 2017 8:30am
#UserID: 9565
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jensen says...
I moved to Far North Qld a couple of years ago.
The garden - and environment - is full of plants I do not recognise.
Some of them probably edible, some probably not. ...
(I only dare eat what I have planted myself. ...)
-Any suggestions for books - etc - about identifying plants?

jensen

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jensen
INNISFAIL,4860,QLD
4th September 2017 3:17am
#UserID: 16572
Posts: 13
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Manfred says...
Tully Library (Butler Street) has a session on tropical fruits by the aptly named Trikus 2 to 4 on Thursday September 14. All welcome, bring fruit for ID.
4043 9138 for bookings (?) but no bookings necessary.

I think the Innisfail Library also has the Rare Fruits magazine which has current local contacts inside the front cover. (The thrice accursed one is in there.)
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Manfred
Wamboin
4th September 2017 10:21am
#UserID: 9565
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Pademelon1 says...
Hi Jensen,

Below I have underlined a method by which to
reasonably quickly develop a decent level of skill in identifying plants. If you are only looking for a basic way of identifying plants or just the plants in your garden and close vicinity, this may not apply to you.

Whilst there are books available on the topic of identifying plants, I do not recommend these as a basis for this skill as there are so many plants out there that it is near impossible to cover the subject, also it can often be very difficult to identify plants to genus or species level due to key features being inconspicuous or only present at certain times of the year.

In my opinion, a better approach is to first identify the general area you want to understand more, e.g. Edibles, Exotics, Natives etc. try and get as refined an area as possible, for you it might be plants of the Australian tropics.

From there, books that showcase a wide range of plants from your chosen grouping can be helpful by allowing you to develop an understanding of the general characteristics of more common plant families. There are also often specialist clubs, botanic gardens or nurseries that can help you further, for instance taking a look at Daley's range of fruit could help with identifying edible plants. If you are just trying to identify the plants in your garden & area, these resources are probably a good place to start.

Once you know the features of more common plant families, with help from a taxonomic key you should be able to identify the majority of plants with not too much pain.

A number of online resources that may help you with native plant identification:

Keys.trin.org.au is an online resource for Australian tropical plants which also has a great glossary of botanic terms.

Bie.ala.org.au is a database for all public Australian herbarium collections. It can provide a usually up to date list of species within genera and genera within families etc. It also has a map feature which you could use to find records of species within a given area.

Plantnet is a great taxonomic key of species found in NSW, including weed species. It may be a little useful for you in just understanding and identifying plant families and genera, rather than individual species due to location difference.

Anpsa is an Australian plant society that has a great online presence with factoids on a variety of more common native species in cultivation

Growing native plants is similar to Anpsa, but is government run and has links to a number of other resources.



If a particular species is especially eluding identification, you could try posting on a site like Daley's, or seek help from a herbarium or botanic society.

These are just tools and methods that I have used when trying to identify a plant and others may disagree or have different methods to mine.

Hope this helps!

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Pademelon1
PADDINGTON,2021,NSW
4th September 2017 4:14pm
#UserID: 11938
Posts: 100
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jensen says...
Thanks Manfred.

jensen
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jensen
innisfal
6th September 2017 2:53am
#UserID: 16572
Posts: 13
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jensen says...
Thank you very much Pademelon1.
I guess I have a lot to learn. ...
In some cases
"e;Plants of Tropical North Queensland, The Compact Guide"e; by John Beasley
has been a great help.
-Probably even greater if I learned some botany. ...

jensen
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jensen
innisfal
7th September 2017 12:28am
#UserID: 16572
Posts: 13
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