Book Discovering Fruit and Nuts by Susanna Lyle

$79.00

This book is a comprehensive guide to temperate and subtropical fruit and nut plants that explores old favourites as well as many little known yet exciting food-producing plants. An inspiration to people to grow and try new foods, the A to Z guide presents over 300 species, with information on cultivation and propagation, harvesting times and yields, storing and using the produce. There is particular emphasis on the nutritional and health benefits of the fruit or nut described. Within these main entries, there are brief descriptions of over 250 similar species, expanding the coverage of this book still further.

Nectarine - White Satin

$46.95

White, aromatic fleshed nectarine requiring 250 hours chill. Beautiful red skin and excellent quality fruit. Prune after fruiting in summer to encourage fruiting wood for next season. Thin fruit for good fruit size.

Amla

$27.00 ($17.90-$79.00 choose a size)

The Amla or Indian Gooseberry is a small leafy tree that grows throughout India and bears an edible fruit. Amla oil is extracted from its seeds and pulp. The amla fruit is often referred to as the "Indian Gooseberry" because of its edible, very tart taste. The pectin content makes it ideal for jam and chutneys. The tree begins to yield fruit from the third year onwards and the productivity levels are good. Amla oil is prepared from dried amla berries, which have been soaked in coconut oil for several days. This oil is one of the world's oldest natural hair conditioners.

Ambarella

$27.00 ($19.75-$27.00 choose a size)

Despite being tropical the ambarella has proven to be quite hardy and are very fast to become established in the subtropics and fruit set begins after only three years. Tastes like a mix between pineapple and mango but with a crunchy texture. The part nearer to the peel is quite sour getting sweeter near the seed. The ripe fruit is also much sweeter than the less mature green fruit. In Indonesia, they are steamed and eaten as a vegetable with salted fish and rice and in Sri Lanka the raw fruit is mostly eaten fresh and cooked as a curry with chilli. As they mature the skin turns golden-yellow with an orange-yellow pulp surrounding a single large spiny seed. When ripe they have a pleasant pineapple-like fragrance. Growing conditions Like the Mango, the tree thrives in humid tropical and subtropical areas growing up to 2 metres in a single growing season. It grows on all types of soil as long as they are well drained. Trees are cold sensitive when small and should be protected from serious frost and strong wind. Trees do best in full sun, but will produce some fruit in light shade. As a large and vigorous tree they prefer not be planted underneath other large trees and unlike some mango varieties they are not too fussed on salt spray.

Jaboticaba - Yellow

$14.90 ($14.90-$79.00 choose a size)

Yellow fruiting species with a distinctive sweet tangy flavour reminiscent of pineapple. We consider this tree a showpiece. Its lime green leaves have an unusual soft, almost powdery appearance and its beautiful golden green pendulous branches make it a worthy feature in the garden for its highly ornamental nature. The fruit of the black jaboticaba is becoming more popular and widespread (I even found some on the shelf of a local grocery store here in Lismore last week) while the yellow jaboticaba still remains a mystery to many. A prerequisite for enjoying the fruits of the Black Jaboticaba is patience. They can often take 6-7 years to come to fruit. However, we have found the Yellow Jabot produce fruit in as little as 3 years. It is a small bushy tree, usually growing to 3-4m in the subtropics of Australia, however I have seen photographs of the tree, in Brazil (its place of origin), with a couple of young boys perched high in the branches. These trees must have reached 9-10 m tall. The tree has a moderate cold tolerance but is best protected from frost. It is a suitable container grown tree in those areas that do receive frost and can be moved to a sheltered position during the cooler months. They are happy in full sun or part shade and are generally small enough to find a place in most gardens. They are relatively wind tolerant but will not enjoy salt spray. They particularly enjoy deep rich soil pH 5.5 to 6.5 but with regular nutrient application can be grown in most soil types. While the fruits have some similarities to the Black Jaboticaba, they are quite different in appearance, having a slightly furry yellow skin instead of the smooth shiny black skin. The fruit contains a gelatinous whitish pulp which has a pleasant, slightly acid flavor. A single tree will produce fruit, but cross pollination has shown to increase productivity. When planting a jaboticaba, the crown (uppermost) roots should be 2 to 3 inches higher than the surrounding soil levels to provide water runoff. Peat, compost or rotted manure may be mixed with the soil from the planting hole to improve it. The soil should be a well-aerated mixture.
  • Postage Free Truck
  • Plant List
  • Calculate Freight
  • Daleys Fruit Tree Forum