Testimonials Shop News Specials Catalogue Contact Forum Blog My Account My Edibles
Dwarf apple pack
Dwarf apple packHedge and Screen PackNative MT buy 3 get 1 FREEBuy 3 get 1 free
Forum Rules | Updates

<< Back to Daleys Fruit Tree Forum

Black Sapote - help me selecting variety?

    15 responses

db starts with ...
Hi All, I'm thinking on getting Black Sapote plant.. Which variety is better suited in Brisbane? Is there any dwarf variety? I was thinking on either Maher or Superb but not sure if is suitable here.. Any other suggestions?

Also, can it be grown in larger pot to keep it dwarf?

Thanks
About the Author
Db
Brisbane
3rd February 2012 11:00am
#UserID: 6427
Posts: 470
View All Db's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Speedy says...
Maher is a smaller growing tree i think, though not a dwarf.
can grow big fruit too.

About the Author
Speedy
Nthn Vic.
3rd February 2012 11:14am
#UserID: 2305
Posts: 250
View All Speedy's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Grant says...
Hi Db, I spoke to the guys at Tropical Fruit World near Murwill. and they reckon the Mossman tastes the best. Huge flatish fruit. I'm thinking i might graft on a branch or 2
About the Author
Grant
Lennox Head
3rd February 2012 1:22pm
#UserID: 6119
Posts: 156
View All Grant's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
db says...
Thanks Speedy and Grant for ur replies.. Which variety will be a smaller tree and so suitable for pots? I'm guessing Mossman will be bigger tree?
About the Author
Db
Brisbane
3rd February 2012 1:33pm
#UserID: 6427
Posts: 470
View All Db's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
epiphany says...
I have Mossman & Bernicker both growing in large pots here in Melbourne. I *did* have an unnamed variety growing in the ground & it did fine but I gave it to a friend in preference for having some named varieties. Mossman is flowering at the moment, so they can't be too unhappy in the pots...lol.
About the Author
epiphany3
 
6th February 2012 3:32pm
#UserID: 6506
Posts: 18
View All epiphany3's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
db says...
Thanks Epiphany for the reply.. How big is ur pot and how tall is ur Mossman now?
About the Author
Db
Brisbane
6th February 2012 3:45pm
#UserID: 6427
Posts: 470
View All Db's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
BJ says...
I'd go for Bernicker. I've not found Mossman particularly edible. Amazing looking fruit though. I've got a Bernicker at 1.2m that has 20+ fruits on that will hold to maturity. Fruit is formed on new growth, so you can prune back pretty hard after fruiting to get a bushy small tree, ratehr than the shade tree they might otherwise grow into. I also have a Maher, but have found it to be much slower. I've had a seedling produce fruit in a 50cm pot. Most grafted types should perform pretty well in a pot, given culture is good.
About the Author
Theposterformerlyknownas
Brisbane
6th February 2012 4:39pm
#UserID: 3270
Posts: 1552
View All Theposterformerlyknownas's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
db says...
Hi BJ, Thanks for the reply, really helpful..
About the Author
Db
Brisbane
6th February 2012 5:08pm
#UserID: 6427
Posts: 470
View All Db's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
epiphany says...
Yes...Bernicker is supposed to have nicer tasting fruit than Mossman but Mossman has a higher pulp percentage. Don't laugh but I grow them in the biggest versions of these (not the 15L ones): http://www.bunnings.com.au/products_product_15l-flexi-tub_3053.aspx Just drill some holes...scoria in the bottom & a mix of potting mix & something to retain a bit of water...bark on the top for mulch. They've been out for a few years now in full sun & have stood up well. And they're easy to move under cover during winter if we're at risk of frost. Yes, they're a bit garish but I try to avoid the *really* bright colours & stick to purple, green & white...lol. I also grow coffee, miracle fruit, bananas, green sapote, white sapotes, mango, ice cream bean, carob, peanut butter fruit...all manner of plants...in these tubs & they do very well.

***edited to add***
There are two types of those flexible tubs...I use the pots branded "Rosie's Homewares." The other ones seem to be made of a slightly different plastic & are stiffer. They also tend to be more prone to cracking when you drill the holes & don't seem to fare quite so well outdoors. The more flexible ones last much better.
About the Author
epiphany3
 
6th February 2012 8:11pm
#UserID: 6506
Posts: 18
View All epiphany3's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Original Post was last edited: 7th February 2012 10:03am
db says...
Hi Epiphany, again thanks for ur reply.. Wow, u r growing those big trees in a pot.. Have u gradually moved ur trees to larger tubs or planted directly in large tubs? How do u usually make ur potting mix?
About the Author
Db
Brisbane
6th February 2012 10:18pm
#UserID: 6427
Posts: 470
View All Db's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
epiphany says...
I move them into larger pots as required. And I honestly think the main key to pot culture is pruning (incl root pruning when you repot, which you need to do every couple of years) as required. It's the same in my garden...I have over 200 varieties of permanent edible plants (not incl all my seasonal fruit & vege) in a regular suburban block...I can't afford for them to get too big - not only is it a hassle to harvest them but I'd run out of room. So I prune. Most of the trees aren't dwarf but I keep them under control - even my beloved apricot tree is small (& productive). I don't have room to espalier much as I use the fences for all my berry fruit & for my kiwifruit.

These plants are mainly in pots because of the potential for frost. It's much easier to just pick them up & move them as required than fluff around with frost coverings. So far it seems to have worked. Obviously I'll never get as much off them as I would if they were in the ground but given the number of plants in the garden, I'm totally fine with that...lol.

I don't do anything super special with the potting mix...I just get cheap stuff & add a touch of homemade compost if I have some avail & a wetting agent (even if it already has some in it). I feed the plants worm tea regularly (well...when I can be bothered...it's probably not as regular as it sounds...lol) & they get some chook & guinea pig poo as required from the coop/cage sweepings (depends a bit on the individual plants as to how much they get & when). Sometimes I'll add rock dust if I remember. It probably sounds like they're all very meticulously maintained but I don't really pander to them too much. I figure if it doesn't survive in the garden, it wasn't meant to be. But so far everything is doing well, so I guess I must be doing something right.
About the Author
epiphany3
 
6th February 2012 11:44pm
#UserID: 6506
Posts: 18
View All epiphany3's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
MaryT says...
That's good advice re pot culture, epiphany. I agree you do need to keep an eye on pot plants - yours are lucky to get worm tea; I must look at getting a worm farm. I had a home made one that did well then I went away and my friends didn't feed it so it 'died' but perhaps it didn't because I gave up and put the stuff in the compost and now I have a never ending compost bin; things just disappear so quickly - must be still some worms living there.
About the Author
MaryT
Sydney
7th February 2012 8:10am
#UserID: 5412
Posts: 2066
View All MaryT's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
db says...
Thanks Epiphany for great advice, it really helps someone who is new to growing fruit trees, like me.. I was bit hesitant to put bigger fruit trees in pot but now I know it is possible and can be managed. Cheers..
About the Author
Db
Brisbane
7th February 2012 8:48am
#UserID: 6427
Posts: 470
View All Db's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
epiphany says...
Mary...there might have been worm eggs in the farm. Often if the worms die off, you get more worms appearing once conditions become favourable again due to the eggs hatching. We have a couple of farms set up indoors to take the kitchen scraps. Our house had an annoying little alcove thing by the laundry door...dead space normally but just the right size for two worm farms. so there's never any issue with hot summers killing the worms off or pests getting in (& no, no one even notices they're there unless I mention them...lol).

DB...your results may vary but definitely give it a go. And good luck!
About the Author
epiphany2
Melbourne
8th February 2012 1:40am
#UserID: 703
Posts: 84
View All epiphany2's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
MaryT says...
epiphany, an indoor worm farm would be so cool; alas I don't have the room. Fortunately my inner city home is so small that everything is but a few paces away, inside or out :) I just put my scrapes in a bowl and take it out once it's full.
About the Author
MaryT
Sydney
8th February 2012 8:59am
#UserID: 5412
Posts: 2066
View All MaryT's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
db says...
I ended up buying grafted 'Superb' variety.. I hope its really superb ;)
About the Author
Db
Brisbane
11th February 2012 9:58pm
#UserID: 6427
Posts: 470
View All Db's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)

REPLY to this forum

Email: Password:
display Name: Suburb:  
Pictures: Add Another Picture
Body:
 
Remember to include a picture if possible

<< Back to Daleys Fruit Tree Forum