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Chewing on Chufas!

    5 responses

Linton starts with ...
I would like to know how long Chufa plants, Cyperus esculentus or Tiger Nuts take to develop mature tubers and if it is too late to plant them now.

While chewing on these Tigernuts got to thinking it would be a good idea to grow some but as you probably already know they are usually planted in Spring and harvested in Winter. If I plant them now do you think the tubers will be ready by Winter as they need to be harvested then so they don't rot.

Another thing, what sort of containers do you usually plant them in? I saw that some people use the white polystyrene foam boxes for growing Tigernuts in and they achieve substantial crops in those boxes. But they are not nice. Is there something better I could use? Thank you.

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Linton
NOBLE PARK,3174,VIC
6th February 2018 6:29pm
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Fay says...
Last year I planted mine late in January and from 2 cups of tigernuts I harvested 5 litres. I was late harvesting because we had a wet winter and I didn’t want to sit in the rain and the mud (raised garden bed). I found that only the original nut rotted. It took ages to harvest because it was a very tedious job. I finished harvesting in August. Also, they sweetened with age. Straight out of the ground, they were a bit bland. I can’t suggest a pot except to tell you that they are extremely hardy so in my opinion, they’d grow in anything. I didn’t plant any this year because, even though I thought I had dug them all up, they came up all by themselves by the hundreds. They didn’t need any care either.
I’ve made tigernut milk and flour but they are so good just on their own. I’ve also got black tigernuts that have a higher oil content.
I’d still plant them Linton. Mine even took a bit of frost before finally dying down.
The plants are taller than normal nut grass, but they are just as invasive. Mine were contained (I thought) in one garden bed, but somehow, some escaped into the sawdust paths.
They take about 5 months to mature but they are cold hardy. If you grow them in pots, you could just move them away from a frosty area to finish off. Near that big tea pot/bong type thing of yours would be good.
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Fay
Toowoomba
8th February 2018 3:29pm
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Original Post was last edited: 8th February 2018 3:39pm
Fruitylicious1 says...
Hi Linton

According to greenthumbs in Europe, Canada and U.S. tiger nuts can withstand -5c, very rare that you get -5c in Vic. Most of them start them in the greenhouse during early spring and harvest in winter. I think they can survive winter in your place. They can also tolerate water logging because they are originally bog plants. Some growers even put a plate of water underneath the pot to give them constant moisture. Just ease up the watering a bit during winter. By spring time you'll have some sedge nuts to chew again.

They share the same characteristics with the water chesnut (eleocharis dulcis) that being boiled without losing their crispiness. I used to eat E. Dulcis when I was growing up in the Philippines in my late grandpas' rice paddy. I remember them being crisp with a lightly nutty refreshing flavor. And they are not nuts but corms or tubers.

With regards to container we as humans are only limited by our own imagination and self preference. Let it run wild then you can see the possibilities.

Happy chufa chomping :-)
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Fruitylicious1
TAMWORTH,2340,NSW
10th February 2018 6:20am
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Original Post was last edited: 10th February 2018 4:01pm
Linton says...
Thanks for your advices which was most appreciated. Hello Fay how you going. Since you previously planted some tigernuts in January, I have planted them now and will see how they go come the time to harvest. They were sowed in pots as suggested and didn't put them in the ground as I don't want them to go wild and take over.

Thank you.
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Linton
NOBLE PARK,3174,VIC
15th February 2018 11:46am
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Fay says...
I grew a couple in styrofoam boxes the year before. Even though I planted a good handful, I didn’t get many come up. It’s because I made the silly mistake of planting them with the point up and the crown-looking part down like planting garlic. 🤪 Turns out that it’s point down and crown up.
There’s a secret to making tigernut milk too. I found that making the milk from soaked raw tubers would make the milk go thick like gravy when heated. When I soaked the nuts and then boiled them before making the milk, the end product could be reheated for hot drinks without thickening. It also made it last longer than the uncooked milk (which is understandable).
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Fay
Toowoomba
15th February 2018 4:48pm
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Linton says...
Thanks for the tips on the tigernuts. I had also planted most of them with the points up so I went to turn them around last week. However they had all grown too big as the stems were several inches high by this time and there's no point in replanting them with the stems growing down.

It doesn't seem to have hindered them from sprouting at all. Easiest things I have ever gown!
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Linton
NOBLE PARK,3174,VIC
26th February 2018 3:45pm
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