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dead!

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Ylang Ylang starts with ...
I brought the Ylang Ylang tree from you last year, and I've pampered it, kept it warm and covered it in frosts (Melbourne has a contrary weather pattern) . No good, the entire top, branches and leaves turned black as coal, as though burnt in an oven. What have I done wrong? Is it worth trying again under different circumstances? I'm heart broken!
Hope you can help
Sheila
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dead
Melbourne
13th August 2009 3:57pm
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Greg says...
Hi Sheila, ylang ylangs are very cold senstitive. Probably the only real hope of success in Victoria would be in a greenhouse to generate some warmth and protect from frosts. Very challenging and frustrating at the same time trying to succeed with a ylang ylang in the cooler regions. good luck, Greg
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Greg
Kyogle
13th August 2009 5:17pm
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Speedy says...
As Greg said,
Ylang Ylang is a chalenge in cooler regions.
Even NNSW they can be a challenge let alone Vic.
I'd go so far as to say you'd need a heated glasshouse.

Ylang ylang start suffering when temps get down to 5-8degC and dont get back up to at least 18-20degC during the day.

The common ylang ylang in that situation would need to be pruned drastically to keep it from hitting the roof.
They flower from leaf axils on lateral growth anyway so it
shouldn't be too much of a problem.

Dwarf forms do exist that will flower at less than a metre high,
though I dont know of them in Aust. (not to say they're not already here).

Another plant that has equally intoxicating perfume and while
different, I rate it in the same league, is the White Champaka (Michelia alba).
'Cempaka Putih' in Indonesia
'Champee' in Thailand

Not to be confused with the yellow Champaka (M.champaca) whos perfume is not as refined as the White C.
- kind of like comparing the balanced sweetness of Osmanthus with
the sickly 'rude, in-your-face' sweetness of Jasmine-
(scents are so difficult to describe!)
M.alba will grow outdoors in Melbourne and I've seen it in a nursery there.
They're usually grafted onto M.champaca and are expensive, but I reckon worth it.

Mine got a bit frosted here in North Victoria this year with some -3degC overnights but it's
a bit exposed atm. and I'll have no probs in future with it as things grow.


There's also climbing ylang ylang (Artabotrys hexapatalus) that
doesnt seem as sensetive to cold.
Not quite as floriferous as Cananga odorata.
There are a few at MtCoot-tha and at city Botanic gerdens in Bris.
Dont know about Sydney BG.
Could be worth a try if you can locate someone who has it.

Desmos chinensis is another climber from the same family worth tracking down
as it's popular in SE Asia for it's perfumed fls.
I haven't seen it in Aust.

Melodorum leichardtii (M.odoratum?) from NNSW rainforests is worth a look at too.
Beautifully sweet perfumed fls. , small understorey shrub, also in Anonaceae.
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Nth Vic
14th August 2009 3:50pm
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Dead! says...
Wow thanks Greg and Speedy. I'm a new gardener so I don't feel like a murderer now! I cut back the Ylang Ylang, and the colour of the trunk near the roots is O.K. But would you still consider this (Twig ) dead and dig it out? You know I had plastic and Doona covers over it, it only went 'crispy' when I decided to water it, over the top.
ABC garden online made mention of a small bush variety called Desmos Chinensis, which I can only trace to a wholesale nursery up north. But I wont bother if Melbourne cold is too much. I am now going on the hunt for the White Champaka (Michelia alba)and maybe the others. I'll try again, and thank you so much for your help
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dead
Melbourne
15th August 2009 12:39pm
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Speedy says...
I was at a nursery early july that was closing down.
they had a lot of Michelia alba (M.longifolia)in 60or80 litre bags
Most things were price reduced to 50%.

worth giving them a call.

http://www.denisestropicalgardens.com.au/products.php?base=21

I'd be very interested in getting the contact for the people with the Desmos chinensis, I've been looking for it for years.
Cheers ;-)
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Nth Vic
15th August 2009 10:46pm
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dead says...
Thanks Speedy, I'll get in touch with that nursery. I found the Desmos chinensis at: http://www.equatorialexotics.com
Sorry I can't make this a link! They're in Queensland. I'll look some more for you.
Also, should I dig up my Ylang Ylang do you think?
Cheers
Sheila
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dead
 
17th August 2009 6:48pm
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Speedy says...
Thats ok, I found it.
thanks.
Yeah, I'd lift it, pop it back into a pot, put it in a warmer and
more protected position (if there is one), till weather warms up.

Be careful though, pots are more prone to variations in temperature,
so if you dont have somewhere constantly warmer,
you may be better to leave it for now.

there are risks either way.

If it goes back into a pot, water with warm water, say 25-30degC to take the chill out of the pot.

My experience over the years with low temp sensetive trop. plants is that they can often
get through winter, only to die in late winter- spring.
Its as if they hang on , and by the time the weather warms up they're just exhausted.




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N .Vic
17th August 2009 10:44pm
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dead says...
Thanks Speedy, what a dilemma. The D' Chinensis only appears on their price list (quite cheap!) Will you let me know if you get one and can keep it alive, outside of a greenhouse. I'm interested to see if it's stronger than it's mate the Ylang Ylang.
Cheers
Sheila
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dead
 
18th August 2009 1:35pm
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Tropicdude says...


There is a "new"? hybrid variety called: Champee Si Nuan, simalar to michelia champaca but with larger flowers that are creamy orange/yellow color. I was wondering if anyone has experience with them, do they grow in pots? how is the fragrance compared to other varieties?
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Tropicdude
 
3rd November 2009 3:26am
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Sampa says...
Does anyone know where I can get hold of climbing ylang ylang vine? "Artabotrys siamensis"
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Sampa1
Vic
2nd February 2010 1:42pm
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Diana says...
Hi Sampa,

http://www.paraplants.com/

(just don't read the newsletter that they include with their plant orders, if you don't want to be annoyed by anti-science ranting).

Diana.
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Brisbane
2nd February 2010 6:30pm
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Sampa says...
Thanks Diana,
Actually Im looking for a rare kind of ylang ylang.This flower has shorter petals than the one you've mentioned. This site has the detail of the plant. http://www.rareflora.com/artabotryssia.html

Samap
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Sampa1
Vic
5th February 2010 11:29am
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Speedy says...
yeah I know the one , in Thailand they call it 'Karaweg'.
I dont know where to get A.siamensis in Aust.
You'd be best to try FNQ,
but as i mentioned earlier in this thread,
I do know where to get A.hexapetalus.
It is easy to grow and really,
most people would't know the diference between the two.
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Nth Vic.
6th February 2010 12:09am
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Speedy says...
I'm not even sure that they're different species anyway....
I'll have to look into that...
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Nth Vic.
6th February 2010 12:13am
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Pieter Bekkers says...
I have 1 of 1+ varieties of A. siamensis
Virginia N.T.
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Pieter Bekkers
 
24th June 2010 10:36am
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sampa says...
That's wonderful Pieter Bekkers. Is it the one with the greensih yellow flowers? Were you able to grow with seeds? Sampa
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nunnu
Pascoe Vale South
2nd July 2010 4:34pm
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Original Post was last edited: 2nd July 2010 5:20pm
Pieter Bekkers says...
There are no people in Australia who have overall experience in identifying different species in the genus Artabotrys.
My friend dr. Piya Chalermglin from Thailand is a specialist. I received from
FNQ what was supposed to be A. hexapetalus
and probably is a hybrid thereof. I received this one in good faith. I imported the seeds of A. siamensis from BKK in person. They germinated quite well and have thorn like appendages much like the hybrid hexapetalus I have. There is very little perfume on my siamensis. A little only on my hexapetalus hybrid. The real A. hexapetalus is everywhere in BKK and has no thorns and very strong pleasing perfume. It is generally without fruit, but I have seen exceptions. It is generally propagated from markots. I believe the real hex. is not present in Australia. The petals on the siamensis have little red spots on the top.
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Pieter Bekkers
Virginia N.T.
28th December 2010 9:13pm
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fruitist says...
I have a Ylang Ylang tree bearing flower for the last 3 years. The seeds came from overseas about 8 years ago.
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28th December 2010 10:11pm
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fruitist says...
I think I barked up the wrong tree, so to speak. My Ylang Ylang is Cananga odorata. I am now crawling back into my own cave again.
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28th December 2010 10:31pm
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trikus says...
fruitist , you are correct ylang ylang is the common name for Cananga odorata , and some people tend to use the same name for other much rarer similar fragrant plants . I know Pieter , he is a passionate collector of fragrant plaNTS . I am also friends with the owners of equatorial exotics and they often wonder at the tropical plants people insist on buying and killing in less than tropical places . And Pieter I do know an Australian who can identify most exotic flowering trees but he is still in Brazil right now and will be returning to his parents home in FNQ very soon . He was curator of Palms and Flowering trees at Nong-Nooch in Thailand for many years after working at Flecker Botanic gardens. Anyway here is my large Ylang-ylang tree growing behind a Philo , just out front , I have a few other very fragrant shrubs planted there asd well a Tabernaemontana and some others I have forgotten names of . smell should knock me out I hope
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Trikus
Tully
29th December 2010 10:35pm
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Pieter Bekkers says...
Of the Cananga odorata there are 2 kinds.
They are entirely different trees. They are taxonomically not legally recognised as such. Here goes. The one which is native to FNQ is Cananga odorata var. macrophylla. It is conically shaped and has a checkered history of success around Darwin. Basically it is too hot here.
This one is also native to Thailand.
I grow Cananga odorata var. genuina. It is definitely not conically shaped, but has branches hanging off it at all sorts of angles. A very untidy tree. It is in flower 100% of the time. I doubt it would grow well South of here. The other variety would have a much better chance, say in Sydney, I believe.
There are many forms of Desmos chinensis,normally yellow flowered, there are red flowered varieties.
Please call him Chinese Desmos, if you must give him a common name. The name dwarf Ylang ylang should be used only for Cananga odorata var. fruticosa. Not known to set seed in Australia, so only grown from cuttings here, with a ridiculously low strike rate.
Now on the subject of Champee si Nuan.
Its correct name is Magnolia alba x champaca. In the Darwin Botanic Gardens there is a splendid example labeled Michelia alba, I believe, next to the Wesleyan church. My friend dr Chalemglin was the first one to identify it, during his visit in 2009
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Pieter Bekkers1
Virginia N.T.
18th January 2011 10:39pm
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Megan Quinn says...
Pieter, have been wondering if a Cananga would grow in Sydney. Do you know where I can get the macrophylla variety you believe could work down here?
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Megan Quinn
Sydney
7th March 2011 12:05pm
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Pieter Bekkers says...
Hi Megan,
The correct variety would have to be traced from Yuruga nursery near Cairns.
They sell minimum quantities of plants.
Check their website. Maybe ask them for the name of a native plant nursery in your area where they send stock,
Happy growing.
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Virginia N.T.
9th March 2011 7:20am
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