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Fruit/nuts for Canberra

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KitschWitch starts with ...
I'm wanting to add some productive species to the north wall area of the house, which has a small eave. It still gets frost, but I can cover small trees for the first two years or so if necessary.

It can fit maybe 3 more smallish trees, including 1-2 espaliered. Additional smaller bushes would also fit.

So far, in the same area, I'm growing:
Lemon, Meyer and Lisbon
Tamarillo, red
Sweet Granadilla climbing the wall
banana passionfruit climbing the wall

I've tried black passionfruit twice--they are our favourite fruit-- and killed both. Maybe not enough water?

I'd like to use this space for marginal species, since there is plenty of other garden area for frost tolerant species.

I've thought of avocado (Bacon), black passionfruit (try again!), dwarf navel oranges, Tahitian lime, macadamia (too big?) ...?? What else would make good use of this position?

Note that we already have:
apples, blueberries, lots of stone fruit, brambles, black mulberry, pomegranate, fig.

Thanks for any suggestions.
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KitschWitch
Canberra
28th October 2013 4:35pm
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ringelstrumpf says...
I wonder that you can grow tamarillo in frosty areas and granadilla. How much frost do you get?
We grow feijoas in the Upper Mountains they like it here, but you should buy a named variety. Mandarins make it through the winter too and kumquats.
My banana passionfruit died but the normal black one didn't. Maybe it was the lack of water.
Oranges and grapefruits grow here too but the taste is not so great, you can replace the grapefruits for lemons. And the oranges I bought at the local coop lacked taste. Olives grow well too and figs. and Ugni. Gooseberries and currants are good too or Josta, but don't buy the thornless gooseberry it's useless.
I want to try out some more "tropical" fruit too, but often the frost hardiness is not so clear.
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ringelstrumpf
 
31st October 2013 8:59am
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KitschWitch says...
This year was fairly mild as you would know, perhaps -4C was the worst frost. In a cold season we could get -8C once or twice.

But this spot is in front of a north facing brick wall and doesn't get nearly as cold.

The tamarillo was badly hit by frost in its first two winters. This year it was tall enough (right up under the eave) adn not as cold anyway, and it hardly lost any leaves. The previous two winters we've lost all of the leaves and even much of the trunk. But it always reshoots well. This winter it flowered and the flowers are still on. Last year the flowers didn't come on until spring, the fruit set in autumn, and was only ready in late autumn--and it didn't have a lot of flavour.
I'm hoping this this fruiting season will be better due to the earlier flowers. Hopefully the longer ripening time will mean more tasty fruit.

As for the sweet granadilla, I was surprised it survived, but it has and is growing slowly but consistently. Lost of new growth at the moment. I hope it will flower and fruit--time will tell.

Thanks for your tips on fruit to try. Some of those I have already, I forgot them in my list (currants, josta, fig). I have another spot for olives and gooseberries since they will take the cold. Will look up ugni!
Thanks for your tips. And I'm glad to hear your black passionfruit has survived--perhaps I will try again.

In case you're interested, I've been looking at Glowinski's book and am considering some subtropical options: jujube, sapote and cherimoya--all are quite large trees, so I would need to find small/dwarf varieties.

Otherwise I'll go for dwarf oranges and maybe a Tahitian lime.
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KitschWitch
Canberra
1st November 2013 12:01am
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ringelstrumpf says...
I am thinking on sapote jujube and cherimoya. We have a sheltered spot under a willow tree, but there is as well a gum tree nearby. Everything citrus I planted survived so far, but they need water manure and a bit of Epsom salt. Jackie French lists a lot more fruits which are supposed to survive frost in her book "wilderness garden" amongst them capulin cherry p. salicifolia and cherry of the rio grande e. aggregata and sapote, but there are a lot of sapotes and she does not deliver a latin name. And grumichama.
But it is one thing that the tree survives and another that it bears fruit in reasonable quantity and quality.
I will try the tamarillo as it does cost me only a packet of seeds.
There is as well the Chilean hazel, genuiva avellana I hope I got the spelling.
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ringelstrumpf
 
1st November 2013 8:44am
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BJ says...
I guess white sapote is the only sapote to come close to surviving -4 to -8. The only other subtropical I know fruits well in Canberra is Loquat. There were big fruiting trees next to the old hotel a few blocks from the national gallery.
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Theposterformerlyknownas
Brisbane
1st November 2013 9:17am
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ringelstrumpf says...
Thanks for that. Yes our Loquat does well, but it hasn't fruited yet. It is a named variety naga... or so. I wonder if you need late or an early fruiting variety to set fruit, but what I'm after is fruit as early as possible.
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ringelstrumpf
 
1st November 2013 10:36am
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ringelstrumpf says...
Maquie berries. You get them at Bunnings. They have not fruited yet but survived winter in an unsheltered position. They grow very good.
There are two trees that did not survive here even everybody tells they are frost hardy: the ceylon hill gooseberry and the strawberry guava, which survives but does not grow well.
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ringelstrumpf
 
4th November 2013 1:34pm
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KitschWitch says...
Thanks for your feedback! I too have lost a strawberry guava, and recently bought another one to try. Fingers crossed.

My only concern with loquat is that I've heard they give fruit flies an early host/place to overwinter. I don't know whether that's relevant for Canberra (in terms of fruiting times etc.) We do get fruit fly!
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KitschWitch
Canberra
14th November 2013 10:44pm
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sternus1 says...
Kitsch,

strawberry guava is one of the less nice eating guavas, but is a highly attractive ornamental tree. I suggest china pear over strawberry as the fruit is high quality and it is also a very attractive tree which is easy to keep small. I rate it over the mexican cream.

s
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sternus1
Brisbane
15th November 2013 7:49am
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KitschWitch says...
Would the China Pear grow and fruit in Canberra (in a sheltered position)?
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KitschWitch
Canberra
19th November 2013 3:27pm
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sternus1 says...
Not sure kitsch. I'd drop daleys a message, they usually get back to you the same day.

s
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sternus1
Brisbane
19th November 2013 3:46pm
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KitschWitch says...
Thanks for all the suggestions.

In my most protected area I'm going to try:
babaco, China Pear guava, longan, and more passionfruit (black and Panama!)

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KitschWitch
Canberra
24th November 2013 1:30am
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KitschWitch says...
@ringelstrumpf-- my tamarillo is (finally) doing well. It's as tall as the eaves and survived this winter without losing many leaves. Flowers were coming on in winter and weren't frosted off. So now, we have thousands of flowers and hundreds of tiny fruit.

They should have plenty of time to ripen and sweeten before it gets cold next year!
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KitschWitch
Canberra
24th November 2013 1:32am
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sssforu says...
Hi Kitsch

Just wondering how is your sweet granadilla doing? Did it survived and fruited ? I am also thinking of giving it a try in Canberra
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sssforu
MacGregor
3rd May 2017 3:03pm
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KitschWitch says...
@sssforu

I moved to the Bega Valley a couple of years ago, so I'm not sure how it's doing. When I left it was still growing well but no sign of fruit.

A banana passionfruit nearby took off and thrived. Lots of flowers and fruit (which tasted better than I remembered).

The tamarillo was also a big success. Plenty of fruit each year once it was tall enough to reshoot well after frost.

Hardy kiwi (yum!) and gold kiwi were also doing well when I left, though not old enough to fruit.

When I next visit Canberra I'll stick my head over the fence and see how the sweet granadilla is doing.
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KitschWitch
Canberra
4th May 2017 11:48am
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Original Post was last edited: 4th May 2017 11:49am
Manfred says...
Hi folx - I haven't seen this thread before so I read through it all. Has anyone (or does everyone) planted kiwifruit. I have seen some really productive vines in the suburbs. Heaps of fruit.

My place near Canberra is too dry and windy. I can't even grow beans because the hot dry winds burn the growing tips in summer. Kiwifruits were one of the first things I planted and after a northwesterly one afternoon I could crumple the leaves into powder, but in a sheltered area they do super-well.
Loquats are great. The kangaroos won't let me grow them but in the suburbs (and in Queanbeyan) they produce amazing fruit. Check out the fruit on the tree on the corner/circle opposite Byrnes Mill around christmas. I have given away heaps of seedlings from that one and they are very popular for size and taste.
Endless amounts of gingko nuts around about now at the Treasury Building ramp entrance side. Go on a Sunday - the security guards are totally cooperative.
Chowne Street Campbell for black walnuts, also around about now. Real walnuts hard to find. A few trees in Queanbeyan back streets, Blue Ridge Camp, the Wee Jasper road, the pottery in Tharwa and a big one right opposite Torpy's in Braidwood (householder very friendly).
Horse chestnuts in Weston Park. Real chestnuts near Blundell's cottage and in Kendall St Qbn. Also lining the street in front of Havelock House.
It's a great resource. Spread the word.
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Manfred
Wamboin
4th May 2017 8:09pm
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