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Garcinia intermedia

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Anonymous starts with ...
Is this plant/fruit available in Australia?

Charichuelo fruit AKA Lemon Drop Mangosteen, Garcinia Intermedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lemon_Drop_Mangosteen

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15
Sydney
17th August 2007 12:23pm
#UserID: 249
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John says...
Yes, I saw some for sale at the Richmond market behind the townhall a few sturdays ago.

John
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Melbourne
22nd October 2007 4:43pm
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Bikolanong Layas says...
This is our Garcinia intermedia, we call it Minerva
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Bikolanong Layas
Philippines
2nd January 2009 11:39am
#UserID: 1808
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Jodie Barr says...
from what I've just researched that fruit is Garcinia madruno. Can be called Madrono or lemon drop (?mangosteen I think) which causes obvious confusion with the Garcinia Intermedia or Edulis which is also called lemon drop mangosteen or Monkeyfruit! We have the G Intermedia and it is a lovely tree, but we have been mistakenly been calling it a Madrono.
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Jodie Barr
Australia
9th January 2009 9:35pm
#UserID: 1837
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410 says...
Hi There,
Has anyone from Melbourne tried growing Garcinia madruno (Garcinia Intermedia), Garcinia Humilis or any other garcinia?
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410
DERRIMUT,3030,VIC
27th December 2018 11:42pm
#UserID: 12919
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Markmelb says...
Achacharu or Achacha is the fastest grower here in melb - all the rest are quite slow - Achacha fruit is available now in asian markets so get a few and plant seeds - my 3yo seedling appears quite cold tolerant in my micro climate and will plant in ground instead of the Mundu which is very slow grower as well as Intermedia - good luck
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Markmelb
MOUNT WAVERLEY,3149,VIC
29th December 2018 9:48am
#UserID: 7785
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410 says...
Hi Markmelb,
Thanks heaps for the reply. Pleased to see people like you trying to grow garcinia in Melb and that encourages me to try them here in temperate climate. I ordered Luc's Garcinia from Delay's about a month ago and already have 2 Intermedias and 1 Achacha (all 1-2 year olds). Intermedia overwintered without a problem but not grown any new leaves at all, painfully slow. Achacha on the other hand has already started nice fresh growth in the summer which has now been grafted into an intermedia rootstock to improve cold tolerance, At least that's what I expect it to be :).

Do you think they will ever bear fruits in cold climate? I read that they usually flower in the winter in Queensland and will the flowers hold on with much colder winters here in Victoria? Only time will tell I guess :)
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410
DERRIMUT,3030,VIC
30th December 2018 12:25pm
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Markmelb says...
I think Achacha would be the best rootstock for all the others as I think is the most cold tolerant of them all ~ even Lucs is cold tolerant but flushes less often than Achacha does per year ~ my almost 4yo Lucs is just beginning a flush now.
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Markmelb
MOUNT WAVERLEY,3149,VIC
31st December 2018 10:21am
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410 says...
Markmelb, can you post some pics of your Garcinias collection? Thanks
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410
DERRIMUT,3030,VIC
10th January 2019 11:12pm
#UserID: 12919
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Markmelb says...
410 - i will eventually put on my Edibles page - cheers
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Markmelb
MOUNT WAVERLEY,3149,VIC
11th January 2019 8:19pm
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Mike Tr says...
Intermedia is here and looks much like a G.brasiliensis and G.gardneriana.These 3 have smaller and yellower fruit than achacha but taste similar.Several species are referred to as Madrono including G.magnifolia,madruno,mountain madrono and several others found further north with larger fruit. The most sought after of the new world Garcinias are Luc's Mexican,lindero and the mountain madrono really.
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Mike Tr
Cairns
14th January 2019 12:20pm
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Linton says...
I've also tried growing various Garcinias in Melbourne but lost a few of them last Summer as they don't seem to like the hot Summers we have here. They definitely need to be grown in the shade but they still seem to get burned and droop on hot days.

The ones I've got left are Achacha Picture 1, Lucs garcinia which is wilting in the heat even in full shade Picture 2, and Mundus Picture 3 which also got a bit scorched.


Cheers!

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Linton
NOBLE PARK,3174,VIC
14th January 2019 8:56pm
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Bangkokii says...
Linton how hot are your summers?

My achacha's do great but are in half shade...If didn't prune them they would be 5-6 meters now.

My Luc's is in full sun but grows very slow. It always looks healthy though, no matter what..We had 36 celcius for some days this winter...maybe i should move it to half shade? It's 30 cm tall and 3 years old.
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Bangkokii
nonthaburi
16th January 2019 1:37pm
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Linton says...
Oh it can get into the 40's.....it was 45 in Albury today. At this time of the year its more frequently in the mid 30's where I live. The problem we have are the hot dry winds that burn the plants. I think they could take higher temperatures in Bangkok where the humidity is much higher and keeps the leaves more hydrated.
Cheers!
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Linton
NOBLE PARK,3174,VIC
16th January 2019 8:12pm
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410 says...
Hello again Garcinia lovers, any idea why the new leaves coming out are deformed? Also they are not growing as big as the original leaves?
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410
DERRIMUT,3030,VIC
16th January 2019 10:17pm
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ivepeters says...
Believe Luc's don't really like direct sun for most of the day.
Mine only get morning sun until 11am, and they're happy & healthy.
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ivepeters
CARINDALE,4152,QLD
17th January 2019 11:44am
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brad16 says...
Hey Bangkokii,

I'm inclined to think that the problem with the Melbourne summer heat may have just as much to do with the dryness of the air, as much as it is the temperature of it. When the east coast of Australia has its summer heat waves, the N/NW air masses that are responsible for them come off the arid deserts in the centre of the country. Those air masses are hot, but also very importantly, they are dry. They draw up moisture very quickly and can dry out susceptible plants in a matter of hours.

It takes time for moisture to be drawn out of the soil and to be circulated up the plant and into the leaves. Large, soft leaves with open pores will lose moisture in these conditions quicker than capillary action can replace it from the roots.

I think Garcinias struggle more with the dryness of the conditions, than with the recorded temperature, although not as much as others.

I have some Chinese Bay Berry (Morella rubra) and Stevia rebaudiana that I use as 'canaries' for moisture needs of the other plants around them. They are the first two (especially the stevia) to start to wilt from lack of moisture. For me they are my favourite 'water meters'.

We also have a large UV index here, and that burns plants just as easily as it does us humans.

@Linton and 410: Pictures 2 of both your posts looked very interesting as far as being able to compare Garcinia growth in Melbourne to more favorable areas. The first thing that caught my eye was the very short growth spurts on the tops of your plants.

There's a well defined difference in the lengths from when (I'm guessing) you bought the plant and the growth they put out on top in Melbourne. I have a few different kinds of Garcinia, and pulled out the ones I could find here in Sydney to compare how they do to yours in Melbourne. I highlighted the lengths of the flushes they produced in the Sydney climate.

It's also interesting to note that the shorter Bakupari tried to put out some new growth just before winter started. It got cold, and they didn't develop past the bud stage and aborted. That plant took another month after the other ones to try again (around late earlier Dec). So although it was prepared to grow in cooler temperatures, it was actually a bad thing, because the aborted growth put it further behind for when the season became more favorable.

I've attached photos of 2 Mangosteens and 2 Bakupari (brasiliensis) purchased from Daleys last April/May. Both Bakupari spent the entire winter outside and the two Mangosteens came inside sometime in May and went out again around mid (maybe late) September.

Just before bringing the Mangosteens inside near the end of last Autumn, there was a nice warm and sunny day. I regretfully put the Mangosteens out for a quick 'charge up' before winter came. Even though the temperatures were a mild 21-22 deg C, that one occasion was enough to burn its relatively new leaves. I thought they would abort, but surprisingly they greened up again (though not 100%) when it warmed up (November).

The photos will let you compare how much your Garcinias are growing, against how they are getting on in Sydney (which is still outside of favourable conditions).
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brad16
GOROKAN,2263,NSW
17th January 2019 5:43pm
#UserID: 14079
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brad16 says...
Hi 410,

The original leaves were grown in a longer growing climate before it was located at your place.

In my experience garcinia requires a constant growing season. In the temperate zone, although Spring brings warmer weather, there is also regular cold fronts that come through and disrupt their growing process. I've found that garcinia doesn't like to be disrupted. Ideally they want a constant warm spell for the duration of each flush. If they do get disrupted, the leaf growth becomes uneven, and as little as a few days of cold weather can put them back a few weeks worth of active growing conditions.

The newest leaves on Linton's achacha are similar looking to the newest leaves on my mangosteen. Linton's Luc's leaves look pretty decent for size and shape, though yellowish. So whether it's the Luc's or Linton, I don't know. I had two Luc's at another location but lost them to drought starved wildlife.

In my experience, Sydney's mid spring is warm enough to start a garcinia's growth flush, but until mid/late summer, cold fronts makes the weather too erratic and prevents them fully developing as though they would if they had a couple months of consistent warm weather. Sydney gets that from around mid December and I'm guessing Melbourne gets that from January. By that time, any new growth spurted by earlier warm weather hasn't had a chance to properly develop, and the couple of months over the peak Summer period is kind of wasted because the plant already has a problematic growth in the place where it would otherwise have started something fresh.

That's my experience with garcinia in marginal climates. Hope it adds to the overall picture :)
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brad16
GOROKAN,2263,NSW
18th January 2019 1:07pm
#UserID: 14079
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brad16 says...
Hey all,

I just found an Achacha. It was putting out some new growth (pictures taken 18 January 2019), so I'm adding some mid Summer pictures of Achacha new growth in Sydney to the catalogue :)

These should get a pretty good run, as far as weather goes. It'll be in full shade along with the other Mangosteens and Bakuparis I photographed yesterday.
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brad16
GOROKAN,2263,NSW
18th January 2019 2:34pm
#UserID: 14079
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