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Lamb Hass

    5 responses

asaber starts with ...
Dear all,
Is Lamb Hass a self pollinating tree?
If no, then what is the best type to plant with Lamb Hass?

Also, if I decided to plant Lamb Hass, then can anybody tell me the distance I should have between each tree.
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asaber
Saber
9th January 2019 12:18am
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Danny333 says...
Hi Asaber,

Lamb Hass pollinates just fine on it’s own. If you plant it in the ground then give it at least 3 or 4 meters to spread. If you prefer to keep them small try growing it in a large pot (150L or bigger ) and prune annually.

I’m growing Lamb Hass in pots and it does very well and produces abundant fruit. I also have some seedlings in the ground that I will graft in autumn.
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Danny333
RIVERTON,6148,WA
9th January 2019 2:13pm
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asaber says...
Hi Danny,
Thanks for answering my questions.
However, are you 100 % sure that Lamb Hass is self-pollinating tree.
I mean I don't want to plant the trees and after 5 years or so I regret not having planted any other types between them.
Also, I appreciate if you have any official document or website to prove it.
Regards,
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asaber
Saber
10th January 2019 11:22pm
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David01 says...
Hi asaber,

Although Lamb Hass performs better than other CVs in terms of self pollination, but Avocado pollination is still very much depend on the weather/temp and bees etc. If you want a better result then you need a B type for Lamb Hass (A). Go through the document below (page 3) and pick a suitable B type which has good flower timing for Hass/Lamb Hass. Cheers

https://www.agric.wa.gov.au/spring/growing-avocados-flowering-pollination-and-fruit-set
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David01
CRAIGIEBURN,3064,VIC
11th January 2019 9:31am
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Original Post was last edited: 11th January 2019 4:26pm
brad16 says...
Hi asaber,

'... regret not having planted any other types between them.'

How many avocado trees are you planning on planting? It sounds like you are you planning a monoculture orchard of Lamb Hass avocados, and hoping to maximise the harvest (for retail $$$ - multiple trees suggests this)?

Avocado flowers are both male and female at different times. I'm sure you've read about A and B type flowers? An indication of what that means can be read here:

http://ucavo.ucr.edu/Flowering/FloweringBasics.html

Because the timing of each flower opening is not 100% precise, overlaps of male and female flowers can happen on the same tree, but the numbers of receptive female flowers open, while productive male flowers are also open are much smaller than would have been available if another type of 'pollinator' tree were present. So although self-pollination is accepted, that is why cross-pollination is recommended to ensure maximum female pollination is achieved.

For a personal use fruit orchard, self-pollination may well be acceptable. If your are planning something for capital gain and hence want to maximise your harvest and therefore return, then a pure monoculture is not recommended. Not only for pollination efficiency, but also for risk management. A single monoculture is susceptible to 'feast and famine' risk.

Avocados are a good fruit for extending cropping seasons. Some are good at hanging on the tree for extended periods and different varieties will have different harvest times. This means that labour and income can be spread over a larger period of time, rather than saturating a small window of time with labour and sales opportunity (don't forget the general rule of pricing - 'the more on the market at any particular time, the lower the individual price').

My recommendation, for both personal use and commercial, would be to plant more than Lamb Hass. For personal use, it means variety, and for commercial it means balancing risk and long term return.

Another thing to consider is that the more that is removed from an acre of land (selling fruit), the more you have to keep shoveling into it. Trees can not keep on producing bumper crops if they, and the land they are rooted in, become exhausted. The produce that is 'shipped off the land' is gone. The tree drew it up out of the land, but it has not been returned. That can not go on forever and is something you'll need to manage if that is what you are planning.
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brad16
GOROKAN,2263,NSW
11th January 2019 2:30pm
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Caleb (Staff) says...
Hi asaber,

We list Lamb Hass (A) as being pollination beneficial, meaning you get a fine crop on its own, but for commercial-standard high rates of fruit set we recommend planting with a B-type avocado, it is to do with pollen release and flower compatibility, common varieties are Fuerte, Sheppard or Bacon.

Thanks,
- Caleb from Daleys Fruit Tree Nursery
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Caleb (Staff)
Kyogle
11th January 2019 3:50pm
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