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sternus1 starts with ...
Daleys have saskatoon berry in production. Beautiful tree with beautiful fruit, I tried them in Canada many years ago.

http://www.daleysfruit.com.au/buy/Saskatoon-Berry-Plant-Tree.htm
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sternus1
Australia
30th July 2015 7:03pm
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Peter91 says...
How do you know they're in production? Is there a place you check?

I think i'll actually get one of these, seeing as I live in a temperate area of Australia, i've been wanting a unique berry plant.

Are they good to eat fresh in your opinion?
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Peter91
North Plympton
30th July 2015 7:23pm
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phil@tyalgum says...
I wonder how much winter chill they need to be productive. Any hope for me in the mountains stern?
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phil@tyalgum
Murwillumbah
30th July 2015 10:57pm
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sternus1 says...
They need about 800 hours at 7C or below for the buds to break dormancy. Victoria and Canberra can get there, some parts of NSW. Worth a shot==the worst that can happen is that you end up with a very pretty but non-productive tree.
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sternus1
Australia
31st July 2015 9:25am
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Linton says...
The Saskatoon Berry is an Amelanchier and they are sold in some nurseries down here. We have discussed these before under the Topic - Amelanchiers

https://www.daleysfruit.com.au/forum/amelanchiers2/

I have a couple of varieties growing and find they are very tough plants and extremely hardy in dry conditions. However they haven't fruited yet so I have still to try the berries.

I would like to add that Daley's description is not correct as they are definitely deciduous, not evergreen. They even have a picture of the orange Autumn foliage before it drops. Yes, deciduous as my trees are still bare and haven't woken up yet but should be soon.
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Linton
Springvale, Vic
31st July 2015 1:42pm
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Peter91 says...
How would these go in Adelaide then Sternus? Would they have much of a chance fruiting?
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Peter91
North Plympton
31st July 2015 7:18pm
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Linton says...
You could also try Hawthorns in Adelaide which are very hardy. I have a few varieties growing and there are a couple of Crataegus species on this website that produce particularly good fruit for eating fresh.

http://ip.aaas.org/tekindex.nsf/2a9c4e44835b04ea85256a7200577a64/6ae37732e16be90885256b9c0060ebdb/Body/M1?OpenElement

Some are reported to grow well in the Mediterranean so they should be perfect for Adelaide.
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Linton
Springvale, Vic
4th August 2015 4:29pm
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Original Post was last edited: 4th August 2015 4:28pm
Linton says...
Amelanchier having fruit now!

Pictures below of one of the Amelanchier trees with fruit beginning to ripen. Last year the birds got them first before they were fully ripe so this year I'm not taking any chances and already netted them with bags from bunnings. Cheers!
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Linton
NOBLE PARK,3174,VIC
24th November 2016 6:29pm
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allybanana says...
Very cool Linton they look a bit like the saskatoon berries I ate in Alberta Canada, what sort of winter chill do you get, do you think these would work in EDEN NSW.
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allybanana
EDEN, NSW
25th November 2016 11:00pm
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loewenzahn says...
Have you tried them already?
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loewenzahn
KATOOMBA,2780,NSW
26th November 2016 7:12am
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loewenzahn says...
I actually looked in my nursery, and I have amelanchier alnifolia and cornus capitata growing... both temperate. I know there are some dogwoods around here and I know one tree ( I hope I remember were) which has pretty good fruit, but I don't know which variety of dogwood it is.
I don't really know why I got these dogwood seeds though - sometimes you wonder.....
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loewenzahn
KATOOMBA,2780,NSW
26th November 2016 9:44am
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loewenzahn says...
sorrry picture one is wrong...
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loewenzahn
KATOOMBA,2780,NSW
26th November 2016 9:46am
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Linton says...
I don't know how much chill Amelanchiers need but the coldest it got to here last Winter was about 5 deg.C minimum overnight. It never get's frost and is quite mild as I'm about 5km from the sea. So I think they would be worth a shot in Eden.

Haven't tried them yet loewenzahn as the birds got them last year but expect to try the ones on the tree now in the next few weeks so I will report back then.

To be continued.........

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Linton
NOBLE PARK,3174,VIC
26th November 2016 8:13pm
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Linton says...
Hi loewenzahn, you could also grow some edible varieties of hawthorns in your area if you don't already have them. The fruits are a bit bigger than saskatoons and my grafted trees are now fruiting in 2 years at about 1 metre.

However the best fruit by far and away, is produced by the Blue Hawthorn - Crataegus schraderiana. So try to get that one if you can or at least seeds but they can be a bit hard to find.

After I have tried all the fruit from the ones I am currently growing I will probably just keep a couple of the best ones, or maybe just Crataegus schraderiana since it leaves all the others for dead with regards to flavour.

Thanks for listening!
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Linton
NOBLE PARK,3174,VIC
6th December 2016 11:26am
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Original Post was last edited: 6th December 2016 11:30am
Linton says...
Here one day.....gone the next!

All of the Hawthorn Berries have disappeared overnight. The grafted Crataegus ellwangeriana tree was loaded with fruit so I was looking forward to having a big feed of them. But the next day I looked at it, all the fruit had disappeared, there were none left, nada, nil, zilch! The tree had been stripped bare.

Wondering what could have feasted on them all so quickly, please advise. There are lots of possums here but they don't usually come in the yard because of the dog. Maybe the dog ate them, it's possible but I don't think so. Could it have been birds, but I never saw any birds near that tree.

Thank you.
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Linton
NOBLE PARK,3174,VIC
11th March 2017 12:07pm
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People who Like this Question ivepeters

Original Post was last edited: 12th March 2017 2:28pm
Linton says...
Not to be daunted by the foraging marauders I still have a good crop on the Crataegus azarolus which are almost ripe. The fruit on the azarolus are larger than the other tree, about the size of walnuts, so not gonna take any chances this time and have netted them all. Cheers!
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Linton
NOBLE PARK,3174,VIC
13th March 2017 8:11pm
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Linton says...
Would like to report that I have now eaten some of the azarolus fruit pictured previously and have got to say that they were damn good. Big, soft and juicy, a bit like a creamy pear and completely different to most other Crataegus species.

It seems strange that such a worthwhile fruit are not cultivated more widely but having researched them further I discovered that there used to be a big old tree that was heritage listed growing in Victory Park in Traralgon. This was the only known specimen of C. azarolus growing in Victoria so they are much less common here than expected. That tree in Traralgon may well have been the parent of the grafted tree that I am currently growing as I obtained it from the same area. Unfortunately last reports from the National Trust a few years back suggest that it has died so this species may become even rarer and harder to find in any nursery.

The pictures from the Heritage site show the tree when it was fully loaded with fruit, looks like enough to feed an army!
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Linton
NOBLE PARK,3174,VIC
19th March 2017 8:46pm
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Original Post was last edited: 19th March 2017 8:49pm
Peter91 says...
How large do the fruits grow Linton? It sounds super interesting and with your description of the flavour I think I'd like to plant one down here, do you k ow where I could get one from?
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Peter91
NORTH PLYMPTON,5037,SA
20th March 2017 10:35am
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Linton says...
Hi Peter

thanks for your keenness for the Azarole Hawthorn. The fruit are roughly the size of a tombola or about 2cm diameter and I think they are definitely worth growing. The problem is I have only just discovered how rare they are here and I doubt if there is any nursery that would have them.

I could give you some seeds from the fruit, but Hawthorn seeds take about 1 year to germinate and then there would be a long wait for them to fruit, compared to the grafted tree I have that has fruited in it's first year.

So grafting a stem piece would be the way to go. Are you able to graft or know someone who can? I read that Crataegus species can be grafted onto Quince. Or you could get one of the more common inedible types like C. monogyna and graft on to that. Should be straightforward to graft, the hardest part would be knowing when is the best time to do it. Cheers!
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Linton
NOBLE PARK,3174,VIC
22nd March 2017 2:37pm
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Linton says...
Need help to identify some Crataegus species!

Recently I visited a farm on the outskirts of Melbourne where they are growing a substantial number of different varieties of Hawthorn Trees. While walking around the grove of trees, sampling the fruit, a herd of kangaroos grazed peacefully a few feet away, watching nervously.

There was one tree in particular with fruit while not as large as some, had an orange coloured flesh and tasted a bit like apricots. Very nice. Since there are literally hundreds of species of Crataegus, I am seeking assistance from someone who might be familiar with this genera who could identify this particular variety. Thank you.
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Linton
NOBLE PARK,3174,VIC
8th April 2017 10:02am
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Linton says...
Fresh Fruit platter harvested today!

Strawberry Guava, Yellow Cherry Guavas, Jujubes, Orange flavoured Hawthorn berries, and Guy Sam Wampees.

Happy Easter!
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Linton
NOBLE PARK,3174,VIC
14th April 2017 12:34pm
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Original Post was last edited: 14th April 2017 12:36pm
Peter91 says...
You're finding some interesting Hawthorn varieties if your taste descriptions are close for other people too.

I was always under the assumption that Hawthorn fruit were generally pretty bad tasting, but i'm still trying to find a tree of the variety you mentioned to try growing.

Are yours in pots or ground? Also what was this farm you went to with the Hawthorns?
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Peter91
NORTH PLYMPTON,5037,SA
15th April 2017 5:01pm
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Linton says...
Yes that's right, many of them are dry and mealy and not really suitable for eating fresh. They do make a very good jelly though and it seems like the cooking really brings out the flavours, even for common types like Crataegus monogyna which you wouldn't bother eating fresh. These are growing by the hundreds along roadsides in the outer eastern suburbs of Melbourne and are currently laden with small red berries. You could just drive along there and collect bucketfuls if you wanted to make Haw Jelly.

But I'm only interested in varieties for eating fresh and even though the ones I have already described are pleasant enough with some unusual flavours they are still nothing to write home about. Might have to wait a few years for some of the other seedling ones to grow up before finding something exceptional. My grafted trees are planted in the ground, still small but already bearing.

To be continued.........
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Linton
NOBLE PARK,3174,VIC
17th April 2017 7:43pm
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Original Post was last edited: 17th April 2017 7:51pm
Linton says...
You should also consider some of the larger fruiting Hawthorns, if you can find them. Both the thornless Chinese Hawthorn, Crataegus pinnatifida, and Crataegus tanacetifolia are larger and have an apple-like flavour, but I'm still waiting on the latter type to produce fruit so I can try it.

In China, the fruits of Crataegus pinnatifida major are dipped in molten sugar and sold by street vendors. I guess it would be a bit like eating toffee apples.

Cheers!
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Linton
NOBLE PARK,3174,VIC
21st April 2017 9:24am
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