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Luma apiculata, (Chilean Myrtle)

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ringelstrumpf starts with ...
Anyone Luma apiculata, (Chilean Myrtle? It is NOT ugni.
Nurseries sell them as an ornamental and I hesist a bit buying them as they are certainly not selected for their eating qualities.
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ringelstrumpf
 
17th January 2013 12:51pm
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Original Post was last edited: 17th January 2013 12:52pm
Jason says...
I have one, it tastes real good! But doesn't fruit regularly, not sure why?. When it does fruit it fruits well and I like it.
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Jason
portland
17th January 2013 3:34pm
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Original Post was last edited: 17th January 2013 3:37pm
rowan says...
I grow a couple, they are flowering now. They fruit pretty well for me adn they taste just as good as Chilean guava (Ugni).
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Rowan
Casterton
17th January 2013 7:15pm
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Jason says...
I've read they are pretty big trees but mines fairly bushy and isn't do big, maybe 12 foot old so, so far
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Jason
portland
17th January 2013 7:19pm
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ringelstrumpf says...
Did you buy these trees as ornamentals or as a fuit tree?
I read that they are growing alongside rivers that may be the reason why the tree does not crop always(in dry years).



































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ringelstrumpf
 
17th January 2013 8:21pm
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Jason says...
You might be right as its in a fairly dry area and I do believe its big crop a couple years ago was during a very wet spring/summer. I generally don't water it because its quite hardy, maybe I will start giving it some extra drinks.

I can't remember where I got mine but yes just from a normal nursery as an ornamental, it doesn't taste anything magical like an ugni, but more like a normal berry fruit and very good in its own right. I bet its super nutritious too
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Jason
portland
17th January 2013 10:22pm
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Original Post was last edited: 17th January 2013 10:23pm
Linton says...
Here is a picture of a Luma apiculata tree currently flowering in a nearby car park. I am not growing this species but hopefully I may be able to try the fruit from this tree first before deciding to plant one.

While the reports about Luma Berries are mostly favourable, from what I have read, the fruit of Luma chequen are far superior to apiculata and well worth growing. Anyone tried these also?

I recently sowed some seeds of Luma chequen after a month of cold stratification in the fridge but so far none have germinated. Would like to know what is the ideal time period they should be stratified for before planting. Thank you.
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Linton
NOBLE PARK,3174,VIC
30th January 2017 1:50pm
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Linton says...
The Luma apiculata tree is now loaded with fruit so got to try them. Found that they have to be fully ripe and deep purple to be palatable, if not completley ripe they will taste resinous. Mark, they have to be almost black before they are suitable for eating. Were the ones you had dark purple or black?

There are plenty on the tree now but don't think this tree is worth growing for it's fruit. I believe that the only Luma species that has exceptional fruit would be Luma chequen so that is the one I'm trying to propagate.
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Linton
NOBLE PARK,3174,VIC
24th March 2017 3:40pm
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