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Multiple Trees in One Hole &amp; Multi-grafted trees

    7 responses

NinaR starts with ...
I want to make the most of the space in my garden & am thinking of giving the multiple trees in one hole thing a try. However, I have a dilemma: a couple of fruit trees were put in about 1-2 years ago prior to me having to move away for work. Now that I have moved back I am wondering if I can now plant some new trees in close proximity to those that are already in the garden?

I already have a:-
1) pomegranate - thinking of adding another 1-2 varieties. Has anyone done something similar with pomegranates?
2) lime - thinking of adding a lemon & either a lemonade, keffir lime or other type of citrus (I'll likely do oranges & grapefruit together in another location, & a couple of types of mandarin in a third location)
3) Apricot - I'd like to add another 1 to 2 types of apricot so that I have nice fresh fruit for a longer portion of the year.

I guess the main considerations would be to try to get the new trees in a similar size to my existing trees so that they aren't dwarfed & also need to be careful not to sever too many roots of the existing trees when planting the new tress - this is something probably easier said than done!

Also - if I want to plant multiple fruits in one hole, does this mean that those trees will need more growing space independent of other 'bunches' of trees? Or in other words, how close could I then plant my next lot of multiple fruit trees in one hole (e.g 2/3/etc metres between each 'bundle').

Also, I've been considering the alternative option of grafting new varieties to my exiting trees (probably not for another year or so until the trees are very well established) But I've read that this can reduce the overall fruiting yield of the tree. Does anyone have experience with this/can anyone confirm or deny this theory? Interested to hear from people's personal experience.

Any help/guidance/ideas/opinions will be most welcome! Thanks in advance
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NinaR
SA
11th August 2015 12:23am
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Brain says...
As an alternative, you can also look into growing fruit trees in pots, where you can put them on concrete path ways etc.

I know citrus can be multiple grafted onto existing established trees, I have even read that some guy have over 100 varieties on one plant. Obviously the trick is to get the established scions/nodes to graft. It is only really limited by the size of the tree and the vigour of the host limb to support the multiple branches. (According to the article, he gets hundreds of fruits a year from that tree).

Personally I found the pots the easier path to have more varieties of trees.

good luck in your quest :)
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Brain
Brisbane
12th August 2015 11:21am
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Bangkok says...
Yes you can make cocktail tree's and grow them in pots. I have several of them.

I have a pomelotree with navel orange, tahiti lime growing on it. I tried fingerlime as well but that failed because the scionwood was only 2 mm thick.

Just try grafting and if it fails try it again.

My mangotree's have about 30 variety's growing on them but they are in full soil. Also avocado grafts well from different variety's.

Budwood can even be shipped and will stay alive for a week or 2.
If you want to graft then wrap them in parafilm totally and then graft with a stronger plastic film onto the hosttree.
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Bangkok
thailand
13th August 2015 10:11am
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NinaR says...
Thanks for your replies.
Definitely considering some trees in pots and also looking more into grafting. I've heard that grafting can sometimes result in the grafted limb becoming too heavy for the host plant (due to vigorous growth presumably) and splitting from the host tree in years to come. Has anyone experienced this and have any tips on avoiding it? I thought perhaps just ensure the grafted limb's size is kept relative to the host tree?
Thanks again
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NinaR
SA
17th August 2015 10:20pm
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Slicko says...
It would be worth effort to have a look at the videos offered by Dave Wilson Nurseries as they deal a lot with two trees in one hole and other options

Www.davewilson.com/

Mick
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Slicko
CARINDALE,4152,QLD
18th August 2015 7:42pm
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Markmelb says...
I agree Mick - All Nurseries around Aust should sit staff down and watch these Dave Wilson videos as they would learn alot about planting and pruning deciduous fruit trees - especially pruning correctly after a bare root purchase.
Non gardeners think their new tree is ruined if they prune back so heavily but they grow with gusto because of it.
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Markmelb
MOUNT WAVERLEY,3149,VIC
19th August 2015 7:32am
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Chris says...
Duo planting may be fine for the dry, low humidity of So Cal, but in areas of humidity it requires far more management and more spraying, beyond the spare time of many.
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Chris
SYDNEY,2000,NSW
19th August 2015 12:41pm
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Slicko says...
I am sure you are right, Chris. I am thinking more of the close planting concept and pruned appropriately to allow adequate airflow between the trees. Perhaps this is less of a problem with the use of dwarfing rootstock.
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Slicko
CARINDALE,4152,QLD
19th August 2015 4:44pm
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