Testimonials Shop News Specials Catalogue Contact Forum Blog My Account My Edibles
Scionwood
ScionwoodNative MT buy 3 get 1 FREEFruit Tree PacksPlants that we have too many of and that will soon outgrow their pot size so need to be sold fast
Forum Rules | Updates

<< Back to Daleys Fruit Tree Forum

Tutorial: Marcotting in 5 steps (Air Layering)

    14 responses

Correy starts with ...
Some examples of plants that you can try this technique on are Lychee, Longans, Also Magnolias, Jakfruit, Figs, Shahtoot Mulberries.

What other plants have you tried/failed with marcotting?

If you can subscribe or like this youtube over at our channel we might do some more tutorials otherwise if it's not up to scratch let us know.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YXCWxDkwREg
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1
  
About the Author
Correy
WOOLLOONGABBA,4102,QLD
23rd February 2018 9:27am
#UserID: 3
Posts: 493
View All Correy's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (1)
People who Like this Question Correy
Julie says...
Correy, would it work on blueberries? They rather hard to propagate by cuttings.
About the Author
Julie
Roleystone WA
25th February 2018 2:21pm
#UserID: 154
Posts: 1704
View All Julie's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(1) LIKE this Question (0)
People who Like this Answer: Correy
Correy says...
Hi Julie, Could be worth a shot. Blueberries are usually propagated from cuttings however this is because nurseries have lots of extra tools to have success like hot houses.

If you are unsuccessful growing them from cuttings then try marcotting. A nursery will usually only marcott when they don't have success with cuttings as marcotts are very time intensive.

In the video description here is a few that nurseries will often do: Longans, Lychees, Magnolias, Jackfruit, Figs, Shahtoot Mulberries are all plants that you can Marcot
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1
  
About the Author
Correy
WOOLLOONGABBA,4102,QLD
27th February 2018 12:29pm
#UserID: 3
Posts: 493
View All Correy's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(1) LIKE this Question (0)
People who Like this Answer: Correy
Julie says...
Thanks Correy. Is there a time of year when it is best to do this?
About the Author
Julie
Roleystone WA
28th February 2018 7:58pm
#UserID: 154
Posts: 1704
View All Julie's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Linton says...
This video is very informative but it seems to make the marcotting process appear much simpler than it is in reality. Some plants I have tried previously can take 6 - 12 months to develop roots down here and by that time the soil has completely dried out which was the main reason they all failed.

The video seems to indicate that marcotts are best done on mature trees. I have just tried to do a few marcotts following the method used in the video. I did them on some my own small trees not having any mature ones, however when using a potful of soil as suggested, the branch just snapped due to to the weight, especially as it was made even thinner after removing the outer layer. So I have ended up mutilating a few of my small trees with smaller branches that are just too weak to support the bag of soil.

Sorry but I don't have any mature trees as indicated that I can try this method on. For this video to be of some use to me, I need to know where I can find some mature Longan or Jakfruit trees in Melbourne or similar species that I can practice on. I don't think many people have access to such trees which seems to have been overlooked in the making of the video but if anyone knows where there are some growing down here it will be great to try this method on them. Thanks for your understanding. Cheers!
About the Author
Linton
NOBLE PARK,3174,VIC
4th March 2018 6:22pm
#UserID: 2286
Posts: 823
View All Linton's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Fruitylicious1 says...
Hi Linton

I have tried marcotting as well with a 100% success rate but, mostly on citrus trees. I normally use sphagnum moss because it is lighter in weight than most media and cover the entire marcotted area with a small plastic bottle. Then I wrap the entire plastic bottle with aluminum foil to trick the plant into thinking that the cinctured stem is in the soil where it is moist and dark. Works every time with citrus. Usually within 3 months they are ready to transplanted into a pot for further hardening. I might try it on other trees next spring.

I have uploaded the image of my current marcotted lemon stem.

Happy gardening :-)
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1
  
About the Author
Fruitylicious1
TAMWORTH,2340,NSW
5th March 2018 8:50am
#UserID: 16885
Posts: 588
View All Fruitylicious1's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Original Post was last edited: 6th March 2018 9:20am
Linton says...
Dear Fruity

I would be surprised if you didn't get 100 percent success rate with citrus. What I have been trying to get my head around is why you need to marcott citrus trees like lemons, and mulberrys for that matter, when they are so easy to grow from cuttings.

I have grown dozens of citrus trees like Limes in the past by sticking any section of stem in a pot and it grows. Mulberries are insane as you just stick a small piece of branch in the pot and within a few weeks it is flushing new growth and sometimes even trying to fruit at the same time.

So I don't understand why would you go to all the trouble to marcott them when cuttings are so much simpler. Is there some mysterious advantage to growing them from marcotts? Please advise at your earliest convenience. Thank you.
About the Author
Linton
NOBLE PARK,3174,VIC
7th March 2018 4:05pm
#UserID: 2286
Posts: 823
View All Linton's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Fruitylicious1 says...
HI Linton

Just for curiosity and it's fun !!!

Happy Gardening :-)
About the Author
Fruitylicious1
TAMWORTH,2340,NSW
8th March 2018 12:56pm
#UserID: 16885
Posts: 588
View All Fruitylicious1's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Original Post was last edited: 9th March 2018 6:08pm
David01 says...
Hi Linton,
I agreed with you that Citrus and Mulberry are easy to grow from Cuttings. However, if you want to have a big grown tree i.e 0.7m to 1.5m in three months and ready to fruit in a year time, then Marcott is way to go. Two technique are all working fine but Cutting applies for small branch/tree and Marcot usually for thick/big branch/tree. In 3-5 years time there should be no different. Perhaps, Fruity will explain it better than me. Cheers.
About the Author
David01
CRAIGIEBURN,3064,VIC
8th March 2018 2:15pm
#UserID: 16671
Posts: 206
View All David01's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Original Post was last edited: 9th March 2018 3:31pm
MyrtleTurtle says...
@Fruitylicious1 Where did you get your Blumenthal white sapote from? I noticed earlier this year that added to the Daleys catalogue was a cultivar called "e;Bluementhol"e; but I assumed this was a spelling mistake. Have you got any fruit from it? Better than Kampong?
About the Author
MyrtleTurtle
Eastern Seaboard
8th March 2018 10:21pm
#UserID: 6913
Posts: 30
View All MyrtleTurtle's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Fruitylicious1 says...
Hi Myrtle

Just bought it from Daley's last year. They sold it under the their pre-purchase catalogue. Never reached the main sales catalogue. Every week I always check their pre-purchase listing because a few of the rare plant varieties are pre-sold before they even reached the main sales listing. Another example was the jujube seedling that I bought that was never sold under the mainstream listing. So if you are on a lookout for something rare always check their pre-purchase column. I will have to wait for a few more years before I can report the blumenthal flavor. Yes, it was a typo error on their part if you cross check it with the American white sapote variety listing.

Happy gardening :-)
About the Author
Fruitylicious1
TAMWORTH,2340,NSW
9th March 2018 9:36pm
#UserID: 16885
Posts: 588
View All Fruitylicious1's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Original Post was last edited: 11th March 2018 9:55am
Linton says...
I have tried to do a marcott now by following the technique shown in the above video very carefully. However, after one month all the leaves have died on the marcotted branch. I don't think that's right, is it? It doesn't look right. Is that supposed to happen or has something gone wrong? Thank you.
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1

Picture: 2

Picture: 3
About the Author
Linton
NOBLE PARK,3174,VIC
18th April 2018 8:01pm
#UserID: 2286
Posts: 823
View All Linton's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Fruitylicious1 says...
Hi Linton

Is the branches really dead as in dried and brittle? It might sprung up if it is still green. Is it a white sapote cv?

In my opinion, there is something missing in the marcotting (air layering) process shown by Daleys, the last and very important step the wrapping around of aluminum foil of the air layered part to prevent rapid evaporation and to trick the stem that it is actually planted in a dark moist soil. Even Rare Fruit Council of Australia has recommended and shown in their propagation article to wrap the air layered stem with aluminum foil. For added success you can also apply a rooting hormone paste around the cinctured stem to instigate the root growth process.

Those are my thought based upon the evidence shown and on my previous experience. Other users might have their own technique and experience which might help to untangle your current quandary. Or better still, throw them (Daleys) an inquiry about their air layering process with regards to your own personal experience through their 'contact us' menu bar.

As Always....Happy Gardening :-)
About the Author
Fruitylicious1
TAMWORTH,2340,NSW
20th April 2018 7:37pm
#UserID: 16885
Posts: 588
View All Fruitylicious1's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Original Post was last edited: 20th April 2018 9:34pm
Edward3 says...
Hi Linton

I have used the method shown by Daleys and it works fine. The same method is shown on the internet by other people without using aluminium foil. The important thing is to ensure that you scrape the bark and stem sufficiently far to remove the cambium layer completely. Secondly, make sure the coir peat is soaked in water, excess water squeezed out but not too hard, and then the plastic bag is carefully wrapped so that the coir won't dry out. We tried this on lychee, lemon, longan, guava and they all worked.
About the Author
Edward3
CARLINGFORD,2118,NSW
17th August 2018 1:52pm
#UserID: 1655
Posts: 43
View All Edward3's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Jacinta says...
I have a mulberry that split - now it has one large branch growing along the ground and one upright. I'm going to try marcotting the split branch - thus saving the branch from just cutting and tossing! And the advantage is I'll get a decent sized tree to plant!
About the Author
Jacinta
Barjarg
18th November 2018 10:50am
#UserID: 19381
Posts: 1
View All Jacinta's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)

REPLY to this forum

Email: Password:
display Name: Suburb:  
Pictures: Add Another Picture
Body:
 
Remember to include a picture if possible

<< Back to Daleys Fruit Tree Forum