Pecan - Apache (B)

$34.00 ($19.75-$34.00 choose a size)

Vigorous tree producing a large smooth nut with thin shell. Good cracking quality. Heavy yielding. Excellent rootstock tree. Requires cross pollination with a A group selection.

Chestnut - seedling

$27.00 ($17.75-$27.00 choose a size)

This European chestnut produces large sweet nuts, the kind found sold in fruit markets. Seedlings are relatively quick to bear and are generally more hardy and quick growing than Grafted trees.

Vanilla Vine

$29.90 ($19.75-$29.90 choose a size)

The fermented pod of this climbing orchid is harvested from the Vanilla Vine or orchid, an aromatic sweet scents used to flavour cakes, and perfumes. Must be hand pollinated. The only insect capable of pollinating the blossom is the Melipona, a bee (see video) , native only to Mexico so all plants must be hand pollinated within 12 hours of the flower opening. The pods take nine month to develop.

Pepper - Black

$24.00 ($23.90-$29.00 choose a size)

Cultivated for the fruit which is dried and used as a spice and seasoning. The fruits are dark red when fully ripe. Immature fruits can be picked as green pepper, black pepper is the fruit dried with the skin on and white pepper is the dried seed only. Black pepper is the worlds most widely traded spice.

Cassava

$19.75 ($19.75-$19.75 choose a size)

Cassava is a shrubby plant growing to about 1-3m, with thin stems and attractive large palm-shaped leaves. A perennial shrub cassava produces a high yield of tuberous roots in 6 months to 3 years after planting. The tubers are the main part that is eaten, but the leaves can be enjoyed as a vegetable dish.Cassava is an important daily source of starch for 300-600 million of the poorest people around the world. It is among the most productive uses of subsistence land, producing 40% more starch than rice, and 25% more than maize..Note that all cassava is poisonous!! In some bitter varieties, all parts of the plant are laced with a highly toxic poison (hydrocyanic or prussic acid). Sweet varieties have lower or marginal concentrations of the toxin. But the more toxic varieties produce bigger tubers! Plants from the tropics have evolved toxins as a defense against predators more so than those from temperate climates which is why they require cooking in order to eat them. Thorough cooking dispels or denatures the harmful toxins, and makes the remaining portion safe to eat.Powdered cassava is treated like a flour and made into cakes, unleavened bread, pasta, crackers. Sliced cassava is also made into crisps. Flat bread made from cassava meal can keep for a year without spoiling. Dried chips or pellets are used as animal feed.Young tender leaves are rich in Vitamin B and protein, but also has more of the toxins. They are eaten as a vegetable. Like the tubers, they have to be properly cooked to remove their toxins.
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