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Hardy fruit varieties for a semi-arid climate

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Cloudbough starts with ...
I wish to set up a small permaculture garden in the semi-arid/rural area of Rylstone/Kandos, NSW. The block has town water and runs north to south. The climate has extremes of 45 degrees in summer and sub zero temps/frosts in winter. I have noticed that stone fruit trees do well. Could you recommend some hardy fruit tree varieties for me to plant?
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Cloudbough
Stanmore
12th October 2019 10:36am
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Original Post was last edited: 13th October 2019 1:58pm
Manfred says...
How big is the block and what soils do you have. Slopes, aspect, drainage, machinery?
Are you able to source a good supply of mulches and organic matter, do you intend to include animals (eg choox, dux). Will you be living there full-time or only sometimes? How long have you got before you want to become fully productive? (Trees or bushes.)

The answers are out there, but the best answers rely on the best input.
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Manfred
Wamboin
12th October 2019 8:42pm
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jakfruit etiquette says...
Stonefruit, Almonds, Pistachio, Apples, Figs, Grapes, Persimmon, Quince all hardy and deciduous. Citrus,Avocado Loquat white sapote and some other subtropicals ok too. Use the deciduous trees placement to let sun in over winter, but give shade in summer.
If you have irrigation for watering, frost protection and summer cooling climate is great.
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jakfruit etiquette
vic
13th October 2019 9:54am
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Original Post was last edited: 13th October 2019 1:03pm
Cloudbough says...
Hi Manfred. The block is 1,012sqm with a small house at the north end. The block is slightly sloped from South to North. No machinery, office-lady hands only. Composting, mulch and organic matter no problem to create/access. Haven't checked the soil's ph yet. Animals are local birds/bees. I will be there occasionally until full move in a few years. Photo provided was taken late afternoon in Autumn. No rush for full productivity, hopefully next 3-5 years. Might have to pay someone to water young stock. Dwarf trees seem attractive. Cheers.
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Cloudbough
Stanmore
13th October 2019 1:53pm
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Original Post was last edited: 13th October 2019 1:59pm
Manfred says...
Hi CB - What Jakfruit said is good though I do not think citrus will do any good. At best a meyer lemon (only if on trifoliata) against a north facing wall in a sheltered position. Figs like a lot more water than most people like to give them.

Avocado worth trying (sheltered same as meyer lemon) but probably not white sapote. Do not persist though if they fail at first. Macadamias will produce but might be slow. Still worthwhile. Loquat evergreen, hardy, totally worthwhile. I cannot think offhand of any other subtropicals. Jak. might like to suggest?

Agree dwarf trees or semi-dwarf (like meyer on trifoliata.

Mulch, mulch. mulch. Use raised garden beds (in full sun) for veges. Include flowers and some ornamentals in your plans. In that area, eg. have a wisteria somewhere and a ceanothus if you can find an open spot.

Use what the neighbours have that you like looking at. Neighbours are a great source of cuttings, seeds, offsets, layers etc. Never hesitate to ask - real plant people are happy to give surplus plants and propagules.

Lots of minor ideas - like (1) a mixed pomegranate/hazelnut hedge/thicket outside front fence (both grow well from cuttings and do not need a lot of water.) 2 metre spacings, a metre out from the fence and mulch. Dahlias in between until they get established. They say dahlia bulbs are edible - I have not tried! (2) Grapes/Kiwi/passionfruit on side fences (growing south to north) (3) white and red currants in a border on the north side of the house. Gooseberries too, but use a hard mulch because you cannot weed them when they are grown (too spikey) - but unfair to Daley website to take up too many column inches.

I cannot zoom your photograph so no site specific recommendations. Perhaps contact on listingdotmanfredatgmaildotcom and we can discuss.

I do not keep up with what is currently fashionable in permaculture circles. Read Permaculture 1, the one with the David Holmgren input. Holmgren was the practical one and the worker, and Mollison without Holmgren is just dreaming and disasters waiting to emerge.

Mulch, mulch, mulch!
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Manfred
Wamboin
17th October 2019 8:44pm
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Original Post was last edited: 17th October 2019 8:46pm
jakfruit etiquette says...
Hi Manfred, most of Sunraysia in Vic, the Riverland in SA and Griffith NSW where Citrus is grown would get 45 deg in summer and subzero frost in winter.
Not sure if Rylstone/Kandos gets lower than -5 or -10 which is severe frost.
You suggested more possible plants, and also many native fruits not mentioned.

Mango, Custard apple, Sapodilla, Longan and Banana could be possible if frost is not too severe.












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jakfruit etiquette
vic
18th October 2019 6:25pm
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Original Post was last edited: 21st October 2019 5:35am
Julie says...
Bush lemons are pretty tough. I had one for years that had no fertiliser or water, and it still produced more lemons than I could use.

Might be hard to find, but easily grown from seed.
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Julie
ROLEYSTONE,6111,WA
18th October 2019 8:37pm
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Manfred says...
The block is at Rylstone which is just west of the Blue Mountains near Lithgow but not as high up as that and much drier. Sapodillas are reputed to be tough enough to take it and the suggestion of bush lemons by Julie is a good one. (See how apostrophes can be avoided!) Custard apples and mangos though are doubtful and I think bananas would dehydrate in the first hot dry wind. Fiji longans might be worth trying. Also might be hard to find.
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Manfred
Wamboin
19th October 2019 10:21pm
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denise1 says...
You could grow native bush tucker plants. There are desert limes, quandongs, muntries, and more. They are perfectly adapted to the semi arid outback. They can fruit when conditions become too hard for conventional fruits.
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denise1
auckland NZ
20th October 2019 9:26am
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Original Post was last edited: 20th October 2019 9:58am
jakfruit etiquette says...
Hi Manfred, most of Sunraysia in Vic, the Riverland in SA and Griffith NSW where Citrus is grown would get 45 deg in summer and subzero frost in winter.
Mangoes are now reasonably common in Sunraysia, ie Mildura, some commercial crops. Bananas have been around for a while there, not sure of the var, its tall but a shy fruiter. Custard Apples and Longans also grown at research stations some Custard Apple vars can take minus frost. Heat may not be such a problem, if irrigation is available.
These are just suggestions, and will require more attention than some of the more obvious choices.
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jakfruit etiquette
vic
21st October 2019 11:59pm
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