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Help identifying a feral fruiting shrub

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gazzahbroome starts with ...
Could any one please help identify this plant that has grown wild in my backyard in Broome? I assume the original seed was brought in by birds or fruit bats that roost in a poinciana overhanging our fence. I do remember seeing on the ground in the vicinity similar seeds to the woody bit protruding from the bottom of the fruit. I just hope it isn't toxic or a noxiuos weed
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gazzahbroome
Broome WA
10th October 2010 3:20pm
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John says...
My guess would be a cashew plant. though I have never actual seen one. Only pictures of the fruit so it could even be a relative.
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John33
Gingin
10th October 2010 3:33pm
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micarle says...
Cashew!!!!! Wow. Wish they popped up round my way!!
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micarle
 
10th October 2010 3:49pm
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Lorna says...
Definately a cashew. Got any more spare seedlings? Ah thats right, it would not grow here.
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Lorna
Albany WA
10th October 2010 5:17pm
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Wayne says...
It certainly does look like a cashew but I am absolutely stumped as to how a critter could spread it.

If it is a cashew, yes the flower is toxic but the seed isn't [of course] Many years ago I tried to de-husk these critters in a camp oven and ended up with a pot of oil, so you need better advise than I can give
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Wayne
Mackay QLD
10th October 2010 5:57pm
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Brendan says...
Yes gazza, as Lorna says, it's definately a cashew, I've got a couple of them growing here :-)

That flower/bulb above the nut can be eaten (sorry Wayne), and it should turn yellow and grow a lot larger, and ripen soon. Nothing to write home about taste wise tho. I 'think' further north, they stuff the flower with cooked rice, shallots, capsicum and prawns or crab etc, then bake them :-)

Now the nut. I was told long ago, to put a heap of nuts in a fry pan, cover 'em with SAND, and cook them?
Can't remember how many times I've tried that, but never seems to work, like Wayne said, all I got was a heap of oily sand :-( Someone must know how to roast them properly?
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
11th October 2010 8:39am
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trikus says...
BE VERY CAREFUL roasting cashews , poisonous fumes and caustic juices .
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Trikus
Tully
11th October 2010 8:51am
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Jason says...
Seeds again :p dangerous stuff I tell you
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Jason10
Portland, Vic
11th October 2010 10:26am
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John Mc says...
I bought one from Daley's not long ago. I assume it might not be warm enough here, just north of Sydney? I read of someone having success with one in Morisset(15mins away), which would be slightly colder than here. Pot maybe? inside my, to be built large poly tunnel?.
Half of my place didn't get frost on that coldest day in 63 years, but the temps do get very low over winter. Average about 5
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JohnMc1
 
11th October 2010 10:51am
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Brendan says...
So it appears there is Arsenic in the oil that comes out of the roasting cashews? (the ones I pick off my trees).
And even the 'raw' cashews have been steamed?
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
12th October 2010 9:21am
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Diana says...
Hi Brendan,

I was put off getting a cashew from the description of the toxic liquid in the shell, and the need for precautions when processing the nuts described in the Daley's print catalogue. I have just been looking up what this is. It does not contain arsenic. I found this in some chemistry papers and the Worksafe Australia website:

'CNSL is a viscous, reddish brown liquid obtained via a number of ways. It can be derived by hot oil extraction, roasting at high temperatures and mechanical extraction.'

'Solvent extracted cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL), conventionally known as natural CNSL, is a mixture of several alkenyl phenols. One of these alkenyl phenols is anacardic acid, which is present at the highest concentration.'

'CNSL is used in the manufacture of resins, automotive brake linings, heatproof and waterproof paint, corrosion-resistant varnish, insulating enamels, and anti-biofouling paint. It has properties against insects, molluscs, fungi, and microbes.'

According to Worksafe Australia's Criteria for the Classifiying of Hazardous
Substances, CNSL Resin is considered harmful due to its potential skin and
eye irritant and skin sensitising effects from the cashew nut shell liquid residual
monomer, thereby classing it as a type 1 ingredient according to the National Model
Regulations for the Control of Workplace Hazardous Substances.
Toxic properties: toxic by ingestion, skin irritant, eye irritant, skin sensitiser.
Ammonia and trace formaldehyde form during processing (heating and polymerisation).

There you go. I still don't want to get one of these trees, as much as I love cashews. I have heard of people growing them only for the cashew apples.

Diana.

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Diana
Brisbane
12th October 2010 2:14pm
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Brendan says...
Thanks for the info Diana, very good.

They aren't a very nice tree anyhow, they sprawl everywhere, the flowers actually stink!, and the flying foxes spread the seeds, which usually sprout :-(
Not only that, they're a huge tree as well. I'm on 5 acres, so no problems, I think :-(
Cheaper to buy than grow yourself and treat IMO.
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
13th October 2010 8:39am
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speedy says...
If I lived in a climate suitable for cashews, I would grow them.
'Feni' would be the primary product. 8-)
... and the nuts, If I got organized enough to process them, would be a bonus.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fenny
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Nth Vic.
14th October 2010 10:26am
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Brad says...
yikes. Feni is worse than unicum! (different too). One of the few really hard spirits I don't like. (I suspect there's different types - the ones I know are from Goans)
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Brad2
boxed up in Como, Perth
14th October 2010 12:34pm
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allybanana says...
As a kid in Papua New Guinea i ate the fruit they have got to be very very ripe before you eat them or they are astringent. In PNG you could get the red and the yellow cashew fruit at the market to eat.

The locals were horrified when we split the seeds open to eat the kernel they used the corrosive juice traditionally for tattooing. Unfortunately my four-year-old sister over heard this conversation and secretly got the scrap pod halves and corroded a rather artistic tree tattoo on her leg. My parents were horrified, they thought she was going to be scared for life, but it went away after a couple of months.
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Eden S-East NSW
14th October 2010 8:41pm
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Charles cant spell says...
This Forum is awesome guys!!!!!!!!!!!!!!, I swear I learn something here every time I read a topic. Well done to everyone and keep that knowledge and personal experience coming through.

Cheers,
Charles Otway
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Charlesstillcantspell1
Perth Innaloo
15th October 2010 1:22am
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juanita says...
You can buy bottled cashew fruit (extracted from the ripened yellow fruit) juice from El Salvadorian shop & tastes really good.
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Melbourne
15th October 2010 1:50am
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Brendan says...
Hi Juanita, does it say on the label what it's good for? Any vitamins/minerals etc?
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
15th October 2010 9:01am
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