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Australian Lime &amp; Lemon Thornless found at Bunnings

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Today I was at Bunnings (in melbourne) and noticed a variety of lemon and lime that I had not seen before. One was labeled "Australian Lime" and the other was "Lemon Thornless".
Doing a bit more research I located the wholesale nursery that produces these varieties: Murray Valley Nurseries.
Descriptions can be found here:
http://www.murrayvalleynurseries.com.au/limes.html

Australian Lime - This tree has no thorns. Heavy continuous cropping. Main crop in Spring and intermitant throughout the year. Fruit left on the tree will change flavour from traditional lime to taste a sweeter flavour, and can be used in drinks or as a garnish. The flesh has an orange tinge. Fruit peels easily.

http://www.murrayvalleynurseries.com.au/lemons.html

Thornless - The Thornless Lemon originated in South Australia. This is a strain of Lemon which is very similar to Eureka in growing habits. The only difference would be that the fruit has a smooth skin and when the fruit is left on the tree after ripening the skin remains finer than that of the Eureka.

Does any one know what these varieties are called around the world (for example key limes are known as west indian limes over here, so are australian limes known as something else as well?), Does anyone know the scientific names of these varieties and finally does any one have any experience growing them in melbourne (or anywhere else for that matter. What do the fruit taste like? are the trees fussy? do they crop continously as in their descriptions in a temperate climate? etc etc).

Any info would help because I don't see these varieties often (mostly lisbon, eureka and meyer with lemons and tahitian and kaffir with limes) and would like to know if they are worth having.

Thanks in advance for any replys!

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J
upwey, Melbourne
5th December 2010 7:20pm
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Phil@Tyalgum says...
There is a comprehensive website you might like to take a look at

http://users.kymp.net/citruspages/citrusindex.html

It has just about every variety of citrus known plus photos and descriptions.
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phil@tyalgum
Murwillumbah
10th December 2010 6:09pm
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Wayne says...
Great link Phil, thanks
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Wayne
Mackay QLD
10th December 2010 7:27pm
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J says...
Phil, I had a look at the website, there's nothing in there about a thornless lemon selection from SA or the australian lime in the description above.
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J
upwey, Melbourne
12th December 2010 5:11pm
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C says...
I rang the nursery in Wood Wood and the lady that answered the phone said that all she knew about this lime was a) it was not a native lime and b) it was developed in Gosford in N.S.W
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C2
Melbourne
15th November 2012 3:25pm
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J says...
Thanks for the info, C. I got fruit my Australian lime this year, its definatly different from my tahitian lime. Fruit is very bumpy, and I must have left on the tree for too long, because the fruit were all yellow by the time I plucked them off the tree and pulp was very dry and flavourless. The tree itself is a vigorous grower and flowers like crazy. I'll get the limes when their green this season and I'll see if they are any good.
The Thornless Lemon was a dud, pulled it out of the ground and potted it. Doing some what better
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J
Upwey, Melbourne
15th November 2012 3:37pm
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BJ says...
If the tree has small leaves and spikes it is the native lime - dooja - gympie lime. If leaves are the same size as normal limes etc it sounds like a feral lime or even rough lemon...
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Theposterformerlyknownas
Brisbane
15th November 2012 3:54pm
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J says...
Not a native lime of any sort. Definately a relative of tahitian lime.
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J
Upwey, Melbourne
15th November 2012 5:17pm
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MaryT says...
My "Australian LIme" has just one fruit and the leaves look nothing like the double leaves on the label. It has no thorns; grown and supplied by Gale Citrus Pty Ltd 55 Bell Road Mangrove Mountain NSW.
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1

Picture: 2
 
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MaryT
Sydney
15th November 2012 5:49pm
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J says...
maryT, the 2nd pic looks like the leaves on my australian lime. The first pic does not resemble my trees leaves or fruit at all. You tried your fruit yet?
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J
Upwey, Melbourne
15th November 2012 6:29pm
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MaryT says...
No, J. The fruit is too little to try yet and it is the first. Will report if it matures into anything edible :)
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MaryT
Sydney
15th November 2012 6:42pm
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Brain says...
I'm curious as to what they actually are, so I'm going to weight in my 2 cents.

MaryT's first pic - I think this could be a generic photo. The lime has seeds - so it can be West Indian Lime as Tahitian has no seeds. The skin is not lumpy, so can't be Dooja/Gympie lime or Kaffir lime. Yet if you look at one or two of the leaves, they are double leaves, which is Kaffir lime leaves. So I'm going to have to dismiss the stock photo as rather useless.

As for the 2nd photo, at first glance, it looks like a Tahitian lime to me, as it has a little bit of the flower stalk remaining.

To further confuse the issue, I've seen Australian Sweet lime on sale . Now, the leave shapes indicate it's definitely not a native to Aus. And researching sweet lime indicated there are some sweet lime from mediterrian origin or Indian/Parkistan or middle eastern knowns as Citrus limetta. Whether they are one of the same, I don't know.

so my guess is, it's either a mislabled Tahitian lime or sweet lime (citrus limetta). My guess is, someone might have grown one from seeds for so long that the plant is now an Australian citizen. And as it probably isn't particularly sweet, so the 'sweet' is dropped. Thus "Australian Lime".

As for Thornless Lemon - I've read literatures indicating there are Thornless Eureka or Lisbon about in Australia. So it's probably one of them.

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Brain
Brisbane
16th November 2012 12:15pm
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Brain says...
just to add, it can also be
Palestine Sweet Lime (Citrus limettioides), as it has a close resemblance to tahitian lime.

http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/sweet_lime.html

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Brain
Brisbane
16th November 2012 12:52pm
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BJ says...
Brain - thats what I was thinking, one of the 'sweet limes' that are often called 'Australian Sweet Lime'. I thought the only Australian sweet lime was the Lemonade tree...
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Theposterformerlyknownas
Brisbane
16th November 2012 1:14pm
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MaryT says...
The label on my "Australian Lime" said Citrus aurantiifolia but I agree with Brain that the label is probably useless as I also have an "Indonesian Lime" that had a Tahitian Lime label with the "Tahitian" crossed out with a marker and replaced with "Indonesian"!. I just hope my "Australian" is not a Tahitian as I already have one (though it's barren).

Now that there are so many Julie Tree seedlings out there, I wonder if we should compare characteristics of these trees one day and see if they have anything in common :) Unfortunately I have given all but one away. So far the one I have has long thorns, large leaves and resembles another seedling that came out of my compost heap (which may be from a Seville I once had access to).

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MaryT
Sydney
16th November 2012 1:24pm
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Brain says...
the more I think about it, and look in to comparing Palestine sweet lime (limettioides) with Sweet lime (limetta), the more I've come to the conclusion that my Australian Sweet lime is in fact limettioides (or its cousin). Based solely on leave shape from the pictures shown below.

http://idtools.org/id/citrus/citrusid/factsheet.php?name=Palestine

even then, throught natural variations, all the plants even with same genetics, can look different, so where is that DNA machine when you need one? To add to more confusion, the 'sweet lime' can be very sweet due to acid free, but the same sweet lime can also be full of acid.

Though, I will have to wait for it to fruit to prove a defnite answer. As mine is quite small, 50cm, so a few years away yet. From the literature, if the lime is very fragant like a bergamot - then it's limetta, if not, then it will be limettioides. It is definitely different from my Tahitian and Sublime (west indian).

hey Mary, I'm surprised that your Tahitian lime isn't producing, as that's easily the most prolific citrus plant of my collection. My only guess is probably because you are in sydney, it might be slightly colder than its liking. LOL.

keep us updated when your Australian sweet lime fruit matures :) and we can all compare notes.
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Brain
Brisbane
16th November 2012 3:07pm
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MaryT says...
Will do; the fruit looks more like a lemon. Longish not round. The Tahitian may be due for mulch as well.
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MaryT
Sydney
16th November 2012 4:16pm
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VF says...
MaryT, I don't know how old your Tahitian is, but it has taken 3yrs for mine to hold onto fruit (tree not small either, about 6ft x 4). It showed no sign of deficiency but I gave it a decent dose of trace elements and perhaps coincidence, it's now holding fruit about 20 cent coin size.
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VF
Wongawallan
16th November 2012 8:27pm
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MaryT says...
Thanks VF; maybe I just have to give it time. It is quite big and healthy, just has not had any flowers. My trees are in pots so would probably look for more food; I'll try some trace elements.
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MaryT
Sydney
16th November 2012 10:05pm
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VF says...
Hope it works for you too MaryT.
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VF
Wongawallan
17th November 2012 6:33am
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MaryT says...
Thanks VF; it's time I give them a good feed. We've had some rain.
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MaryT
Sydney
17th November 2012 9:02am
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Brain says...
Just been to bunnings, spotted a 'sweet' lime from cedar creek. They have labelled it as Citrus limettioides sweet. The leaves also has the fold in a V shape. So I am fairly certain that the Australian sweet lime is in fact related to the Palestine sweet lime.
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Brain
Brisbane
2nd December 2012 10:41pm
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Charlton says...
The Australian lime is probably a lime/mandarin cross, fruit is similar to rangpur, but milder, orange flesh, light yellow skin. It is prob. unknown outside Australia. The Sweet Lime limmeteoides is well known. Not sure if the 2 are closely related, but now that you mention it Brain, the leaves are a bit similar. The sweet lime fruit are very mild, with a hint of rosewater/turkish delight which you can get from the leaves.
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Charlton
egypt
2nd December 2012 11:04pm
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Roozbeh says...
We Iranians call it Sweet Lemon.(Limoo Shirin) shirin means sweet in Persian/Farsi.

Please check:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citrus_limetta
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Roozbeh
MILL PARK
8th September 2017 6:56pm
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