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Transplanted mango trees

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rinmak starts with ...
Hi everyone

Exactly one month ago I transplanted two mango trees in to my back yard. The person I got them from told me they are KP variety and approx 3 years old, grown from seed. Both were quite green and healthy with only a few leaves having a slight tip browning on them before the transplant

When I planted them in to the new location I mixed about 20% cow manure, 30% organic compost and 50% original sandy soil (Perth coastal plain) in to backfill around the root ball.

Since transplanting 1 tree has taken things better than the other (see pics). Since then I have been applying seasol every few days and an application of blood and bone but the bad one doesnt seem to be improving.

My questions...

1) Is the tree likely to bounce back? Can this be a normal behaviour for some post transplant
2) Would I be helping or hindering with the fertilizer applications?
3) is there anything people can think of that I can do to give it a better chance at bouncing back? Pruning/stripping leaves etc?

Thanks in advance!
Ryan
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Picture: 2
 
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rinmak
Perth
27th August 2014 9:53pm
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Markmelb says...
Seems to me too much TLC - even for perth should have waited till soil warms to 15c and mangos dont need alot of fertilizers - in fact what your doing is maybe killing them as still too cold - plants dont show instant reactions - take off all whats on top without damaging surface roots and just put on plain pine bark mulch and wait till warmer conditions and reassess in November
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Markmelb
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27th August 2014 10:16pm
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Boris Spasky says...
Do you love your lawn or do you love your mangoes more?
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Boris Spasky

27th August 2014 10:21pm
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rinmak says...
Thanks heaps Mark. I was worried that it was too cold for the transplant but the move was driven by necessity at the time. Will try mulching the top to retain some heat.

Would taking the dead leaves off be a good move at all? Or just leave it be
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rinmak
Perth
27th August 2014 10:24pm
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rinmak says...
Why is that Boris? Bad idea planting around so much lawn?
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rinmak
Perth
27th August 2014 10:25pm
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Markmelb says...
Mangos do well in pots too - if they survive make at least a metre diam circle or bigger as you have the room there - you shhould see buds soon near top - if they dont survive put a new one in - try a Keit or Palmer or grow a Honey Gold from seed from December fruits - better plant than KP in cooler conditions I think so far
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Markmelb
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27th August 2014 11:08pm
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MaryT1 says...
rinmak, any tree that has to compete with a lawn is in jeopardy, especially a new one. Apart from competition, the chemicals/fertilisers you use to keep a lawn beautiful may be detrimental to the tree. I agree with Markmelb that you must clear a wider circle underneath the tree - imagine the canopy of the tree when grown and keep that space clear of grass, then mulch it. You don't have to dig up the grass, just cover it with say 10 layers of wet newspaper or equivalent of cardboard and put mulch on top. At present if you can do that and then water it well, presuming you'd dug a good hole when planting you might be able to save the tree. Do not fertilise until you see new growth.
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MaryT1
Sydney
28th August 2014 8:19am
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Original Post was last edited: 28th August 2014 8:19am
JohnMc1 says...
Hmmm, the one in the second pic doesn't look too healthy. Mangoes usually move well. If everything was done right, it should pick up. If I move anything, I do it all in August, good time for here in NSW at least. the tree is at it's slowest growth period just before the ground starts to warm. I have some experience in moving several mangoes, one needed an excavator to get it out of the ground and is still doing well.
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JohnMc1
Warnervale NSW
28th August 2014 8:20am
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MaryT1 says...
OMG JohnMc1 you are really serious. I bow to you. That tree you moved is bigger than my entire orchard :) Well done.
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MaryT1
Sydney
28th August 2014 8:37am
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sternus1 says...
Bloody Hell, you're keen John.

what variety is the mango?
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sternus1
Australia
28th August 2014 9:02am
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Julie W says...
rinmak, something else I would do, though you won't get quick results: put up some support on those fences and grow creepers. It will give you a much more sheltered environment, as well as looking more attractive.

I visited some people a while ago in the northern suburbs, close to the beach. Their fruit trees in front were doing poorly and they had no idea why.
They thought the lawn growing up to the trees would be a good 'mulch'.

Their trees also were very exposed, with no other plants to protect them from wind etc. Get planting with more trees and shrubs if you can.

@John Mc - what sternus said!
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Julie W
Roleystone WA
28th August 2014 1:29pm
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rinmak says...
Well guys I have taken the advice on board and mulched a bit further out around the base of the tree. Heres some pics and some questions:

- I scraped back a small section of the trunk and there appears to be green inside it still. Is this a good sign that the tree is still alive and could bounce back?
- Some people are telling me its beneficial to remove say 70% of the leaves from the tree to help it recover. Opinions on this?

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Picture: 2

Picture: 3

Picture: 4

Picture: 5

Picture: 6
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rinmak
Perth
1st September 2014 12:50pm
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gimme says...
Hey rinmak, your mango tree is dead even though there is green in the stem.
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gimme
TINGALPA,4173,QLD
1st September 2014 1:12pm
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Brain says...
I will weight in my 2 cents.

If still green after you have scrap off the bark, then yes the tree is still alive. But prob just and its touch and go.

Removing the leaves wont help as the leaves are brown and dead already. The 70% rule probably applys to reducing transpiration lost and reduce tree stress at transplant, but for your mango, what it is showing is severe shock and die back already.

I suspect the current signs are due to stress and shock and the fertilisers only compounded the lack of water uptake. Not a lot you can do now but to wait and hope that the die back stops at some point and new shoots to emerge.

If you really want to save tree, i would dug it back out from the soil, soak roots in water and a little seasol for a few hours, trim dead roots and branches but dont cut off green trunks,replant in pot with good potting mix and keep soil moist. And just hope, its 50/50. Good luck!



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Brain
Brisbane
1st September 2014 1:17pm
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gimme says...
I have seen a lot of fruit trees go to the compost heap this way. The way the bark looks wrinkled and the way the petioles hold to the tree suggest the tree will only ever go backwards from here.
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gimme
TINGALPA,4173,QLD
1st September 2014 1:38pm
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rinmak says...
Thanks for the input guys, I did suspect it would likely not improve from here. Next time I have access to them is November so it will stay in the ground until then and if its still shown no life I will replace with a younger, grafted one.

Any suggestions as to a reputable place to buy a grafted tree in pot? And should I aim for a KP variety or is there any other that may suit the location and soil I have better?
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rinmak
Perth
1st September 2014 2:12pm
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MaryT1 says...
rinmak I am not as willing to pronounce the tree dead - when I zoomed in on the pics I think I can see some signs of bud swell. It may well recover depending on care.
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MaryT1
Sydney
1st September 2014 3:38pm
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rinmak says...
Thanks for the glimmer of hope Mary. Is that the bud visible at the very top in Picture 1?

I'll be sure to post pics when I go back to check on it/remove and replace in 2 months time.
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rinmak
Perth
1st September 2014 4:58pm
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MaryT1 says...
No rinmak, I was looking at Pic 2 and 3 between the leaves and the trunk of the tree.
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MaryT1
Sydney
2nd September 2014 8:06am
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stavva says...
hey people. just got given a small mango tree, just need some tips on how to transfer it from pot to garden? i.e. soil, position etc also possibly thinking of just putting it into a larger pot?
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stavva
glenmore park
26th April 2017 6:30pm
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Original Post was last edited: 26th April 2017 6:32pm

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