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when will my new nectarine tree flower?

    18 responses

dan starts with ...
Hello, i have recently planted a nectarine tree. when can i expect it to flower? it has small buds which have slowly formed. first time owning one and unsure when or how quickly buds will open up. still no major signs of it starting to flower.
living in western sydney. planted just before spring. fertilised and pruned a week ago. thankyou.
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dan
smithfield
5th September 2013 9:13am
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Rob says...
I'm growing a Fantasia Nectarine in Melbourne and it has been in bloom for a couple of weeks now. To be honest I would have thought you'd get blooms before me, especially considering Fantasia is a mid to late season variety.

Fingers crossed it's just a later season nectarine than mine.
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Rob19
Portland Vic
5th September 2013 5:11pm
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dan says...
thanks Rob.
i also have a nashi pear beside it with the same issues. but my plum tree has been flowering for a few weeks now.
ive attached some pics.
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1

Picture: 2

Picture: 3
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dan
smithfield
5th September 2013 5:46pm
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Boris Spasky says...
Don't be timid [a wuss] Dan when it comes to pruning peach/nectarines.
You haven't pruned it back hard enough. Prune within inches of the graft even. Your tree won't settle and take off unless the top and bottom are in balance.
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Boris Spasky
 
6th September 2013 8:28pm
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dan says...
really? that much Boris?
its my first time with these trees so im unsure about their growth.
i havent any shoots close to the graft. wouldnt this risk killing it?
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dan
smithfield
7th September 2013 7:00pm
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Brain says...
Have a look at the ABC gardening Aus web site and they should have a clip or two with Tino (or some other presenter) pruning bare rooted trees and shaping them for the years to follow.

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Brain
Brisbane
9th September 2013 1:28pm
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Original Post was last edited: 9th September 2013 1:41pm
dan says...
thanks Brain. but one final question: i have no buds just above the graft. they're all on the branches, and even then, the branches are too far away from the graft. so if i were to cut back all the way to just above the graft as Boris is suggesting, wouldn't this risk killing the trees or will new buds appear that around the cut area?

thanks.
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dan
smithfield
10th September 2013 5:22pm
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Boris Spasky says...
Flower buds or leaf buds?
Lack of flower buds on a newly planted (pruned) tree is no big deal.
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Boris Spasky
 
10th September 2013 9:55pm
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dan says...
only leaf buds at the moment and as you can see in the photos attached, they haven't yet opened. anyway, i pruned it back further to the lowest leaf buds on each branch. hoping that this will stimulate the tree in pushing energy through.
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dan
smithfield
10th September 2013 10:42pm
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Brain says...
I think this article will shed some light in your situation :)

http://www.agric.wa.gov.au/objtwr/imported_assets/content/hort/fn/cp/gn_shaping_deciduous_fruit_trees.pdf

not that I'm an expert in pruning or shaping stone fruits, but if it was my plant, I'd keep the 2 side arms (the Y) and a middle central leader. Remove all the tiny branches and of the 3 main arms (2 side and one central), cut them by about 1/3 to 1/2 from trunk.

Also, I wouldn't worry too much if the plant is a bit slow, given the right climatic conditions and after the plant has adjusted to its new surroundings, it should come back to life.
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Brain
Brisbane
11th September 2013 10:30am
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dan says...
great information. really appreciative Brain.
ive done as you said and pruned just above trunk.
its the first time ive owned peach/nect and pears, so still learning. fingers crossed it all comes along well.
thanks for your advice and time.

Dan.
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dan
smithfield
11th September 2013 6:44pm
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Brendan says...
Picking my tropical nectarines at the moment :-) They're not the biggest I've grown, but they are certainly tasty! Yum.
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1
  
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
29th October 2013 9:10am
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Murf from Nuri says...
Hi Dan, did your nectarine eventually bloom? I have also just planted (in July) a bare-rooted nectarine (peacharine variety) and it is yet to bloom (in early October). All my other new fruit trees have sprouted, I'm also a novice when it comes to fruit trees, so any advice would be greatly appreciated.
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Murf from Nuri
Nuriootpa, SA
6th October 2016 11:33am
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Original Post was last edited: 6th October 2016 11:35am
Don C says...
Hi Murf. If the tree was heavily pruned when planted the fruit bearing wood may have been removed. Does it have flower buds? http://www.ent.uga.edu/peach/peachhbk/pdf/stages.pdf
I think it is a mid season fruiter, around late January for you. You should have no trouble with the chilling. Therefore, I would expect that the tree should be coming into flower and leaf pretty soon.
At the end of the day the tree will decide when it is going to break dormancy.
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Don C
Karangi
12th October 2016 5:37pm
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Murf from Nuri says...
Many thanks for the reply, Don. We pruned the tree when we planted it, although not heavily. There is no shortage of (furry) buds and the tree seems healthy. I suspect it is a late bloomer - aren't we all! - and it's happy to wait. I'll let you know when it happens. Cheers.
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Murf from Nuri
NURIOOTPA,5355,SA
15th October 2016 3:11pm
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DorisM says...
I have a "e;e;White Satin"e;e; (dwarf variety) nectarine that's been in for 4 years now. Each year it's been pruned and flowers profusely early September just when the spring winds hit in Central West NSW. Within days, all the blossoms are stripped and I have another year of no fruit. Everything I've read about the "e;e;White Satin"e;e; says it's a late bloomer ie. December onwards. Is there anything I can do to retard this early blooming? I would like to have fruit from this tree but am happy to use it for root stock for grafting an old apricot. What late blooming varieties should I be looking at? Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated. Thank you!
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DorisM
Rylstone
26th October 2016 12:41pm
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Don C says...
Hi Doris,
From what I have read, you should expect the fruit to be ready to pick by Dec in your location, earlier in places with warmer winters. The page for each variety has customer feedback on the bottom and some people put in their fruiting months. This is very handy, but varies a bit depending on your climate. http://www.daleysfruit.com.au/buy/nectarine-white-satin-tree.htm . As a low chill variety, I would expect it to flower at the start of spring for you and in late winter for people with warm winters. Therefore, I think the blooming will always occur around this time. Maybe you could try a wind break if there is a prevailing wind that causes the damage. Otherwise, as you suggest you could try grafting onto it. Perhaps you could look at some high chill varieties. From my understanding peaches/nectarines tend to live10-20 years. Apricots live much longer, so although it is a compatible rootstock, the life of the apricot may be cut short by the rootstock. Maybe with someone with a better knowledge of grafting will know whether this is true. If you are going to graft onto it, perhaps you could try multi grafting several things on to see what works best. If you see any local trees doing well, ask for some scion wood next winter.
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Don C
Karangi
27th October 2016 9:31am
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Original Post was last edited: 28th October 2016 9:57am
Murf from Nuri says...
The nectarine never bloomed. Turns out it was ringbarked soon after we planted it by an unknown creature (a cat or rabbit?. WE noticed the scratch marks at the base, just below the draft, but thought no more of it. There could be no other reason for the tree to die. Very disappointed, of course, and will plant another next winter. All other trees are thriving, so perhaps nectarines are more attractive to animals. Has anyone else had a similar experience?
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Murf from Nuri
NURIOOTPA,5355,SA
28th October 2016 8:29am
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DorisM says...
Hi Don,
Thank you so much for your reply and the link. We've thought of a wind break but it's a little impractical as we get strong winds from both the east and west. Being a novice at orcharding, I wasn't aware nectarines had shorter life spans than apricots. I think I'll look at getting a high chill nectarine to try and another apricot to graft onto as the old apricot is coming up to 50 years old and I'd like to keep it perpetuating. You've given me plenty of food for thought - thank you again!
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DorisM
Rylstone
29th October 2016 7:37am
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