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What citrus is this?

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chillilover starts with ...
Anyone know what citrus is this. It's very sour and is great for making lemonade. I remember seeing these plants in Fiji. About a 10cent to 20 cent coin in diameter. I got this aas a mature plant of some guy who said it was kumquat but i am sure it's not.
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Chillilower
sydney
3rd January 2012 11:24am
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amanda says...
Looks like a 'ripe' west indian lime? That tree looks very unhappy BTW... :-(
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
3rd January 2012 11:51pm
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chillilover says...
it is very unhappy. I might be able to save it. If not i have lots of seedlings coming up. I'll be giving these away in the near future.

As for the west indian lime theory i read that the plants are very thorny but this one isn't at all.
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Chillilower
sydney
4th January 2012 7:14am
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Original Post was last edited: 4th January 2012 7:16am
Mike says...
It is not a like and looks closer to the sour orange types.I reckon as the friut look similar to flying dragon/trifoliata it could be one of the many rootstock plants (not citrange) closely related to oranges.
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Cairns
4th January 2012 9:51am
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Peter says...
Could be one of the less known citrus hybrids or even an own species - I would not know which one. I would try to save the tree by spraying with phosphite after harvesting the fruits - trunk and leaves. It need to be done when maximum reaches 25 degree celcius only.
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Peter36
Perth
4th January 2012 9:57am
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jakfruit etiquette says...
Can you take a photo of seed, and inside the fruit??
It's not a West Indian Lime, not a cumquat or not one of the common rootstocks. You say it is sour,any more info?? is there any "mandarin" flavor??, it could be a type of Rangpur lime. Anything unusual about the flavor, Is the foliage scented at all, ie lemon scented??
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5th January 2012 12:10am
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Brendan says...
Looks like a cumquat to me. They make the best marmalade. Give it a go.
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
5th January 2012 7:53am
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Mike says...
I should have said it is not a lime.Rangpur and calamondin (some people mistakenly call these cumquats) look like small mandarines and cumquats are tear to egg shaped.The foliage showed also that it is none of these.Trifoliata rootstoock is spherical, very seedy, 50c piece size and sour.When you grow seeds from oranges and lemons a variety of types can result and it might be one of those seedlings.
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Cairns
5th January 2012 9:38am
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chillilover says...
Mike you might be right about it being the calamondin. This is what it looks like.

http://www3.sympatico.ca/mwhitcombe/calamondin2.jpg

But i have also taken a photo of the cut fruit. The fruit is slightly dry so appears smaller but normally when healthy it's plump with quite a lot of seeds in it.

I am also interested in saving this tree. I'll be picking all the fruits off today and if i find any good seeds save them. I need to know from where should i prune this tree. Honestly the chances of it making is very slim but i'll try. The plant was originally in the ground and the guy who gave it to me was getting rid of it so i had to dig it out. The roots were so deep i had to hack quite a few off. And now i have put it in a pot. Any suggestions what to do. I also have grown a few seedlings just for backup.
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Chillilower
sydney
5th January 2012 9:58am
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Original Post was last edited: 5th January 2012 10:00am
Peter says...
It is a good idea to prune the tree. I would get rid of 2/3 of the smaller branches and move the pot to a shady spot and avoid excessive watering especially stagnant water (the water should freely drain away out of the pot) or fertiliser first.
When new shoots/leaves are formed apply a Phosphite as a foliar spray.
Out of three citrus I dug out only one recovered - so wait for others what they do!
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Peter36
Perth
5th January 2012 10:40am
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Peter says...
Maybe you should also try to graft several healthy branches on another citrus, if you have some other in your garden. If the tree is extremely important, you can further increase the chances by buying a young calamondin tree, but then graft your branches on it as well (+trying some cuttings)
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Peter36
Perth
5th January 2012 10:53am
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chillilover says...
Hi Peter unfortuntately i don't think any of the branches are healthy enough for grafting. I have trimmed the tree and harvested whatever fruit was left these. Lots of nice seeds. I might germiate these and sell or trade the seedlings. Let's see how we go.
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Chillilower
sydney
5th January 2012 12:15pm
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Mike says...
Now I see the picture of the cut ones they just look like ordinary old calamondins but the trees leaves look a bit big.
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Cairns
5th January 2012 3:43pm
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chillilover says...
Hi Peter, thanks for your suggestions above. The plant will make it. Already little greenish growth is appearing all over the plant. Very tiny to say leaves yet but surely them. I think it's time to apply Phosphite soon.
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Chillilower
sydney
9th January 2012 1:27pm
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Peter says...
Good! Wait with the phosphite when you expect a day not higher than 25 degree and then spray in the morning. If you want to be careful, treat only half of the branches.
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Peter36
Perth
9th January 2012 1:55pm
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Peter says...
Oh, and assuming you have the plant in shade, the leaves will be shade leaves and these will be always prone to sunburn once you move the tree back to full sun. However, when you move the tree back to the sun at the time you see a second flush of leaves coming, these will be exposed and sun hardened straight away, so the burns from the first leaf flush might be acceptable then.
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Peter36
Perth
9th January 2012 2:00pm
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au0rey says...
I think they are comquat calamondin fruits. I have one such plant. Nice to make drinks with and squeeze the upripe juice into chilli paste to add some zing.
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au0rey
melbourne
9th January 2012 2:08pm
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chillilover says...
lol Peter. I didn't follow your suggestion of moving the tree into the shade as it's very heavy and i couldn't lift it. It's still sitting in the sun. Do you think i should move it still or let nature take it's cause.
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Chillilower
sydney
9th January 2012 2:47pm
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MaryT says...
My calamondin has no problem coping with the sun; I think yours was just traumatised by the move. It will be fine now that it's shooting again.
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MaryT
Sydney
9th January 2012 2:53pm
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Peter says...
That's the best case scenario then. If the transplanted tree can cope with full sun, then you don't have to go through the acclimatisation procedure later on. Seems like you got a big portion of the roots still intact and can hopefully support the new branches coming up. Still I would go for the phosphite treatment, which can only do good to the health of the tree, if applied at the recommended dose.
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Peter36
Perth
9th January 2012 3:11pm
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chillilover says...
No probs Peter. The wait is on for a cooler day.
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Chillilower
sydney
9th January 2012 4:50pm
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chillilover says...
update: Turned out plant is called calamansi. Very similar to calamondins or might just be a different name.
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Chillilower
sydney
10th January 2012 2:10pm
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au0rey says...
Yes calamondins and calamasi are the same. They are well used in Asian.
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au0rey
melbourne
10th January 2012 5:54pm
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chillilover says...
lol now i really feel like a fool
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Chillilower
sydney
10th January 2012 8:39pm
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Arthur says...
Hi chillilover,
The calamondin and calamansi are two very different variety of fruits. The calamondin is a kumquat while the Calamansi is a lime. Malaysians, Indonesians and Singaporeans use the Calamansi in their cooking, in their sambals, curries and also in making a refreshing drink. In Malaysia and Singapore, the calamansi is called Limau Kasturi. Filipinos may use the calamondin in their cooking but their cuisine is quite different to those of Malaysians, Indonesians and Singaporeans. The calamansi fruit has seven to eight segments while the calamondin has five. I have long been looking for the Calamansi plant (or fruit), and if you have any to sell, please provide your contact number. My email address is. crickey888@hotmail.com
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Arthur3
Blacktown
27th June 2012 9:31pm
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sue says...
I have been looking for a calamansi tree for my son's fiancee who is from the phillipines and would be interested in purchasing a seedling from you if you were able to supply one.
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sue25
keysborough 3173
24th March 2013 12:43am
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Brain says...
I'm going to weight in the debate here. I am of the view the Calamondin and Calamansi is one of the same. If you look up the scientific name for both, they are
Citrus madurensis/Citrus microcarpa/Citrofortunella mitis/Fortunella japonica. Which describes the same plant.

Anyway, the varegata/variegated form is readily available at Bunnies or you can purchase the full green & variegated versions here at Daleys. Otherwise you can go to some local Philipino store and buy some calamansi/calamondin and try growing yourself. Good luck.
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Brain
Brisbane
25th March 2013 2:10pm
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MaryT says...
That's the trouble with common names; both of you, Brain and Arthur, maybe right. The number of segments thing is interesting; I must investigate what I have in my garden.

From: Carpel Polymorphism in Citrus Fruit:

Each citrus species and cultivar in the Aurantioideae exhibits a distinct range of carpel (segment) numbers within their fruits. The observed range of segments for fruit within any species or cultivar can be influenced by branch location on a tree. The carpel number for all fruits produced on a single tree may have a symmetrical, unimodal distribution, as well as a positively or negatively skewed unimodal distribution. Most citrus species produce fruits that contain eight to ten segments. However, the average segment number per fruit may be as high as 17 in some pummelos (Citrus grandis [L.] Osb.) or as low as four in some kumquats (Fortunella japonica [Thumb.] Swing.). Correspondingly, pummelos are the largest citrus fruit in terms of fresh weight and diameter, while kumquats are the smallest. Fruit geographical orientation on the tree does not affect the segment number. Abscission of fruit does not select for any particular segment number. Crossing parents with dissimilar fruit segment numbers produces progeny with a range of segment numbers.
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MaryT
Sydney
26th March 2013 6:36am
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Original Post was last edited: 26th March 2013 6:42am
Brain says...
I've done extensive reading on the mystery of the calamondin/calamansi and will further pass on my 2 cents if members don't mind.

One of the Australian sources refers the calamondin as Marumi Kumquat. And I believe due to the roundness, it is often confused with being the Round Kumquat (Marumi) of Japanese Origin. I.e. in between a Nagami (oval) & Meiwa. Certainly the only way to tell them apart is by the size of the skin oil glands and seqments. Yes calamondin/calamansi has more seqments.

If the botantial literatures are correct, the calamondin/calamansi is of SE Asia and Philipines origin. I have purchased a variegated calamondin (I recall reading it as microcarpa) to a Philipino couple and they tell me that the fruit looks like calamansi. I'm also waiting for some fruits from my plant (of the same source) to do a taste test by friends from the philipines to be sure. Sadly the fruit flies beat me to it.

In addition, I have purchased a patio varegated kumquat labelled F. Japonica - thinking that it's kumquat. However, as the fruit has turned out, it was the same shape, size, oil gland as the calamondin.

In the Australian context at least, because the Calamodin is often mislabelled as a Kumquat (and used interchangably), and calamansi is not a name that is used, the consumer who actually want one is just confused at what he/she is buying.
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Brain
Brisbane
26th March 2013 3:06pm
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mgoul131 says...
I agree with Arthur3. Calamansi and Calamondin are different fruits in Malaysia at least. In the Philippines, there may be 2 fruits called Calamansi, one of them being the Calamondin, the other being a lime. I also think that in Malaysia, Calamansi is probably Limau Kasturi, which may be the same as Cassia lime. I don;t think there is one species called Calamansi, probably mainly seedling variations of C. aurantium but also maybe C. microcarpa. In other words Calamansi is probably a generic name meaning small sour fruit with a particular look to it.
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mgoul131
WITHEREN,4275,QLD
16th June 2019 6:21pm
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