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Competition: How my Fruit Tree Survived the Cold

    66 responses

Correy starts with ...
Answer the question.

How I got my "[ Enter your Edible Plant ]" to survive the cold.



Criteria we are using to Judge



Idea Works: We are after success stories that inspire us to get out into the backyard and give it a go.

Pictures: Not necessary but it really makes your answer come alive. Especially if you or a friend are in the shot with your plant who is a cold survivor.

Include Where your From: In the Location section please say where you are from.


Prizes


1st Prize: $100 Voucher
2nd Prize: $50 Voucher
3rd Prize: $25 Voucher

Dates to Remember


Competition is open from Friday 13 May 2011 to 13 August 2011
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Correy
Brisbane
13th May 2011 3:53pm
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Original Post was last edited: 13th May 2011 4:03pm
Nick says...
Hey Correy, I got my Bowen mango to survive the cold for 2 years by surrounding the trunk with small containers of water and then draping a large light cloth over the top everytime the night temperatures got below 4 degrees. On the occasional 1 or even 0 degree nights I wrapped the lower trunk with some warm paper towel (to the dismay of my mum :P). Also I gave the tree applications of Seasol to increase frost resistance. This year I'm planning to apply some Yates Droughtshield, but nonetheless I'm hoping next spring it will produce some fruit! :D
Pic 1 is its "baby" photo, pic 2 is after being planted, 3 and 4 are at the start of this growing season and 5 and 6 are from today (funny how you can see the vegie patch develop in the background, eh?).
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Nick T
Altona, VIC
13th May 2011 5:12pm
#UserID: 2663
Posts: 727
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JUJUBE FOR SALE IN MELBOURNE says...
Hi Correy,

My acerola cherry at my Melbourne home has never let me down, apart from giving me beautiful flowers in summer and the fruits are divine. I bought the small tree from Daley in 2001, winter was much colder then. Whenever I buy big items I always save the plastic covers for my trees at winter time.

In the first 3 years of having the tree, Around May, I watered the tree well then covered with a thick layer of mulch then wrap around the trunk/ root zone with a big rectangular sheet of plastic overhanging to halfway of the pot, overlap a bit on the root zone so not much water can get in. Finally, I used elastic string to tie the sheet just below the handles, water once in September. I removed the sheet in late October when the weather is bout 25C or more. After 3 years the tree got used to the cold Melbourne water then I donít do it anymore. It is a big tree now and most leaves drop in winter but that is ok.

Please check my edible page for photos.
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JUJUBE FOR SALE
Melbourne
14th May 2011 11:53am
#UserID: 2706
Posts: 715
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Clive says...
Hi Correy, I got my 2 metre banana tree to survive last winter by cutting off excess leaves and wrapping it up like a pole with shadecloth.It had a good start to the season and I ate my first home grown bananas this year.
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Clive
Tabulam
15th May 2011 9:09am
#UserID: 5298
Posts: 4
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Original Post was last edited: 3rd July 2011 9:34am
CDK says...
I found the best solution is to plant my trees in beautiful sunny Brisbane.
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CDK
Brisbane
17th May 2011 8:25am
#UserID: 5314
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Steve says...
We bedded down our fig tree with a generous layer of lucerne hay and then 1/2 buried 2L water bottles around the drip line perimeter.

This has two major benefits:

- Water has a way of keeping the soil at an even temperature.

- Figs like a restricted root system anyway for fruiting.
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Steve23
Bookham, NSW
17th May 2011 12:38pm
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John Mc says...
Hey Correy,
Is that pic from the recent cold snap the whole east coast of NSW is having?
How do your soursops thrive and fruit through that?
It looks like the cold intensity in my part of the world is a walk in the park compared to that and I'm just an hour north of Sydney.
Anyway, to control frost on my tropical marginals like Soursops, Star fruit, Abiu's etc, I planted them under the canopy of large eucapypts.
My theory is that the canopy is like a huge umbrella and blanket. It stops the cold air from decending over the tropicals and at the same time holds in the surrounding and ground heat. Much like cloud cover in winter, that's where I got the idea from.
The shallow ground temps are still in double figures under the eucalypts while the air temp has got down to 4deg min.
A dilute foliage spray of Seasol every couple of weeks helps strengthens the tropicals and so far it's working a treat.
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John Mc
 
17th May 2011 8:46pm
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Ann S says...
We have had excellent results by covering the top and south western sides of frost sensitive plants with hessian supported by a frame of steel droppers. We also wrap as much of the trunk as possible with thick newspaper (use a whole paper such as a Sunday Mail, wrap around trunk in sections and tie or tape on). We are establishing a new orchard in a very open country setting and our mango, avocado, fig, mulberry, etc trees have done well for the past three years. This year we will not cover some trees such as the mulberry and fig as they are large enough to withstand frost damage. To be sure with the mango, even though it is quite large, we will only wrap the trunk in newspaper. A generous amount of straw around the plant also helps.
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Ann S
Goondiwindi, Qld
18th May 2011 8:32am
#UserID: 5318
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Original Post was last edited: 18th May 2011 8:33am
Sammy says...
Necessity is the mother of invention
I am told that in Afghanistan where temperatures fall to minus 30 in some areas and summers are very hot people still grow tomatoes and cucumbers as well as other veggies very successfully throughout the year. They make use of ground heat by digging a channel say about 4 meters wide and two meters deep and planting their veggies where at that depth temperatures remain constant at 20 degrees. They spread a plastic sheet on to to stop rain filling it up. This way they avoid putting up greenhouses and heating up during winter which is very expensive. This may be relevant to growers in Australia where their produce is plentiful in summer and prices are very low and in winter when prices are high they cannot afford to grow due to high prices of fuel to heat the greenhouses up.
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Sammy1
Sydney
27th May 2011 9:25am
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fruitist says...
Tiny Soursop fruits can survive through Brisbane Winter.

At the moment I have 14 Poshte fruits ranging from ping pong size to 5cm big. I have enclosed the 2 smallest ones in thin transparent plastic cups. You can get those cups from "pearl drink" shops.
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27th May 2011 4:46pm
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Wayne says...
Well Correy, you sure have some dedicated growers here, well done guys, you should be proud of your efforts
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Wayne
 
27th May 2011 6:17pm
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Kym says...
Hi,
I have used a few methods to keep my tropicals alive in our cold and frost effected area.
I have a banana tree planted in a corner between brick building and rainwater tank. It has been in for about 7 years and I am having the second fruiting.
I also have a Jaboticaba also located near the brick building which has been in for approx 6 years.(no fruit yet)
I have a white sopate which has been in 3 years this one I surrounded with shade cloth on all side until it has now outgrown the shade cloth.(Its about 7-8 feet tall)
I have a mango and longan both of which are planted in 44 gallon drums with polycarbonate on the tops. I put a second drum ontop when they get too big for one. I will need to cover with shade cloth when they out grow the drums.
Regards
Kym
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Kym2
Strathalbyn SA
30th May 2011 9:06am
#UserID: 5364
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Kath says...
Over three nights in mid July 2007 we had severe frosts here at Daley's nursery, the murcury dipped below -7 and our orchard was devastated. The initial damage was shocking, all the leaves died off on every evergreen tree in the orchard and it was clear that our preparation for a -3 was not sufficient to save all our trees. It was about 3 weeks before our bosses ventured into the orchard to face the horrible truth of what had happened to our fruit trees and they took the chain saw with them. We cut everything back hard and waited for spring. The recovery was quite amazing, the avocado's were the first trees to respond positively to their prune and they put out a flush of new growth as soon as the weather warmed up. The black sapotes were back into fruit production within 3 years and we have enjoyed two bumper crops since with another coming on for late winter spring 2011. There were a few losses with the custard apples and cherimoyas hit the hardest as they were planted in a lower part of the orchard, if we had had their trunks wrapped in protective material we may have saved more than the one that survived this harsh winter. Four years on and the recovery is complete, our trees don't show any signs of the trauma they experience on those cold nights, however we are a little more in tune with the weather warnings through the winter and have systems in place to ensure our orchard does not go through this again. When the night time temperature drops to zero the sprinkers come on and as the night begins to freeze this forms ice on the surface of the leaves, the formation of ice creates heat and protects the cells inside the leaves from freezing. It also creates a winter wonderland as the photo on our newsletter shows.
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Kath
Cawongla
1st June 2011 12:39pm
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David says...
Well we are trying three starpickets surrounded by shade cloth recycled from the Brisbane City footpath cleanups. I have thought to take advantage of the night dew by forming a dip in the shadecloth across the centre of the starpickets to allow the dew to drop into the plant area as the day heats up.
We shall see how it goes, so far so good despite the cold being enough to damage Agave plants the fruit trees are surviving so far.
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David30
Tara Qld
19th June 2011 12:44am
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John Mc says...
Seeing cold weather records could be broken again this winter, I thought I'd knock up a few of these for my most cold susceptible young trees. Really simple to knock up. It's just a roll of heavy duty chicken wire I had lying around tied into a tube shape, then covered with some old poly tunnel plastic I had left over from my last project. I could possibly leave them on during the coldest days for extra warmth. They could be made up to any size, they're very light and portable. I'll punch in two tomato stakes to hold them in place.


EDIT: I've copped some ridicule from the wife over this, she likens my plant protection system to a method of birth control.
I've never seen her laugh so much. So please, I've heard all the jokes.
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John Mc
 
20th June 2011 10:56pm
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Original Post was last edited: 21st June 2011 6:20pm
Jantina says...
Ha ha ha ha ha ha (but I didn't say anything John).
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Jantina
Mt Gambier
21st June 2011 9:20am
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BJ says...
Impressive, erm... 'structure' there John...
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Theposterformerlyknownas
Brisbane
21st June 2011 10:58am
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Jason says...
John it looks like your plants wouldn't feel a thing on those long cold Winter nights

:)
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Jason
Portland
21st June 2011 3:36pm
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Sammy says...
Hi what you mention about Afghanistan is very true. Another friend told me about it a couple of months ago and I have mentioned it to a few growers. It is definately the answer to high heating costs. My neighbor grows cucumbers and tomatoes and during this weather his cucumbers pickings are paltry not worth the time to pick them but the fetch $5 kilo while in summer he has practically give them away at 50c kg. The cost of putting up a greenhouse about 100m x 50 m is about $60,000 and he has no end of trouble during high wind season and I believe he can dig a a series of small valleys of that size for about the same cost maybe even cheaper. The plastic he will lay on top would not be much and very little wind effect. He can grow these veggies all through the year and get top money for them as well. What an idea to adopt here.
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Sammy1
Sydney
27th June 2011 3:56pm
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amanda says...
That's really good food for thought Sammy :) It's not too expensive to smaller scale earthworks done - I can usually get a bloke with a backhoe for $80/hr - and a good experienced operator would be able to knock me up a few valleys in no time (in sand tho'!) Working with natural contours/hills on the land even more efficient (if u have them that is) I can even hire a bloke with a bulldozer for $90/hr!
Can get free land-fill here - by endless massive side-tippers carring 20cum a load (crap from housing developments) for making the 'sides'...it's amazing what u can source sometimes.

The method could be an advantage in hot, drying climates in summer also...using shadecloth instead do you think?
If all fruit trees could be on dwarf rootstock - it could even be feasable for small orchards too perhaps? I know my orchard windbreak cost a small fortune and gets hammered in the winds too...it also needs a roof of shadecloth in summer - but we are talking mega bucks for that kind of set up :(
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amanda19
Geraldton. Mide West WA.
28th June 2011 6:55pm
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snottiegobble says...
Well its not for the want of trying is it? Even so some of "Barney`s" leaves have gone yellow including the newest & also the pup`s. I suspect that I should have closed the cover door for the cool nights sooner than I did. Or maybe I have overfed the plant? Is that possible with bananas?
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snottiegobble
Bunbury/Busso (smackin the middle)
29th June 2011 1:12am
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John Mc says...
Looks good SG. Can you give some detail on construction or some close ups? I'm about to modify mine, I've been the joke of the crescent lately.
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John Mc
 
29th June 2011 7:14pm
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Mike says...
John the parcel arrived and we'll see how they go.Thanks for that.I sent a batch to you today and there is a fair variety and you should get something out of it even if the seeds are not planted until it warms up.
The cold protection covers are more sophisticated that my mosquito net,castnet and bird net arrangements.I get a few raised eyebrows in the neighbourhood from those.
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Cairns
29th June 2011 7:31pm
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snottiegobble says...
John Mc The construction is as follows; I used five 2.4 mtr star pickets ( cheaper at salvage yards) & hammered them in dead level height then formed a circle of black polypipe around the top of them securing with wire using the holes of the posts near the top. Incase this crown slips at any time I covered the tops of the posts with the yellow plastic caps available from Bunnings so not to damage the plastic roof.( These caps give you access to the holes for tying) I then drove in two 2 m recycled plastic stakes ( hope you have them in your area) opposite each other & fed a 1 1/4 inch polypipe over each to form a semi circle apex & secured it to the inside of the poly circle.
As the see-thru plastic sheeting only seems to come in 2 mtr widths ( GRUNT builders plastic) I was restricted both in height of walls & diam of circle roof. so keep that in mind. The plastic sheeting is so easy to apply these days using the nylon spring clamps avail. in packs of 16 (several sizes) You will need quite a few to make sure roof cover is tight & rain runs off.
I used black plastic sheeting inside at the back of the tent( facing Nth) to capture any heat from the sun when flap is open!
Happy camping John!



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snottiegobble
Bunbury/Busso (smackin the middle)
30th June 2011 1:15pm
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John Mc says...
@ SG:
I like the idea of a strip of black plastic lining the southernside of your mini polyhouse. I'd assume you'd have to ventilate it on warmer days to avoid overheating.

@ Mike:
Hope they arrived in reasonable order.
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John Mc
 
30th June 2011 1:53pm
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amanda says...
Nice one SG :) where did u pick up the plastic spring clips? They look very handy!
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amanda19
Geraldton. Mide West WA.
30th June 2011 5:50pm
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snottiegobble says...
John, the covering & black plastic will be removed in the spring.
Amanda, the spring clips are the best thing since the wheel & you will find them in Bunnings, hardware stores & even camping/ outdoors shops because they are so useful!
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snottiegobble
Bunbury/Busso (smackin the middle)
30th June 2011 7:58pm
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snottiegobble says...
I am worried about the pale leaves so any ideas or tips would be appreciated!
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snottiegobble
Bunbury/Busso (smackin the middle)
30th June 2011 10:16pm
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Nick says...
I doubt it'd be under-fertilising or over-fertilising because bananas take whatever you give them and I doubt you've underfed it (just assuming). I don't know much more but it could be under/over-watering or mineral deficiencies.
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Nick T
Altona, VIC
1st July 2011 6:46pm
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snottiegobble says...
The yellow leaves have large brown patches now also so you may be right. What if I try some sulphate of ammonia ? A guy who used to have a banana plantation up North said they love urea yet nobody else mentions it!
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snottiegobble
Bunbury/Busso (smackin the middle)
1st July 2011 7:02pm
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Nick says...
My dwarf cavendish in the greenhouse loves a bit of a urea watering if you know what i mean :P
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Nick T
Altona, VIC
1st July 2011 7:31pm
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Clive says...
Don't worry about the banana leaves' colour, it is due to the cold.Come spring , cut them off as the new shoot comes through from the top.You probably know that one needs to have a main trunk , a "follower" for the coming year, ( as bananas fruit on the second year's growth) and a sucker for the year after that. Keep the suckers and followers as far apart as you can , as when the follower grows it will lean over at an angle, and when IT fruits , the weight of fruit will pull the tree over, as the trunk will also shrink at this time.
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Clive
Tabulam
3rd July 2011 9:59am
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John Mc says...
Here's Mk 2.
I'm a little concerned about the soursops. It doesn't frost where they are, as a matter of fact, the ground temps haven't dropped below 10deg at all his year so far. I just want to give them that little extra protection. These covers are so easy to make.
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John Mc
 
3rd July 2011 7:10pm
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Mike says...
John it looks like a lot of trouble to go to.I hope those seeds arrived as they were sent on Wednesday lunchtime.If you're after soursop seeds I know a tree with big sweet ones.
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Cairns
3rd July 2011 7:14pm
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John Mc says...
Oh,I wish I wasn't so far away from Cairns. They'll be here probably tomorrow.
I think I'm kidding myself, I'm not expecting them to do any good at all. I bought a seedling and a grafted one from Daley's, I can only live in hope..
I'll have to wait till I get my big polytunnel built before I have any real success. I have plans to build a 6m x 12m by 3.5m high and have made provisions to double that. The area has been excavated, I only have to find some time to get building.
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John Mc
 
3rd July 2011 9:03pm
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Mike says...
Soursops might be marginal for you but atemoya and cherimoyas are probably better and would go well in your area.Most trees can be pruned small and your polytunnel may produce some surprising results and house a few trees.If you are after hard to get plants I can send out feelers up here.
When the seeds arrive tomorrow you may have questions if you can't read the pen on some bags.I have many more kinds of seeds and tubers etc but some that are not worth planting from seeds or are too tropical might not be worth it.
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Cairns
3rd July 2011 9:31pm
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John Mc says...
Atemoyas and Cherimoyas do very well here. I have four cv's of Atemoya and four of Cherimoya. Harvest is slightly delayed compared to Qld.
I'm trying my luck with a couple of Annona Squamosa's as well as a grafted and seedling Rollinia. It's hard to believe, but the grafted Rollinia is still producing flowers.
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John Mc
 
3rd July 2011 10:59pm
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peter says...
hi john
i have a seedling rollinia but would have prefered a grafted one. where
did you get yours from.
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adelaide
3rd July 2011 11:31pm
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John Mc says...
Hi Peter,
Daley's sell them here from time to time. You can get them to notify you when they become available.

http://www.daleysfruit.com.au/fruit%20pages/rollinia.htm
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John Mc
 
4th July 2011 1:45pm
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BJ says...
If Daleys arent grafting them, you could try forbidden fruits. Daleys had a few varieties available quite a lot not too long ago, but I havent seen any 'in production' for a few months.
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Theposterformerlyknownas
Brisbane
4th July 2011 4:31pm
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Mike says...
John, those seeds must have gone astray if they are not there yet.
Quite a few of the annonas are ripe here at the moment and my last gefner was a beautY.This season the fruit looked like cherimoyas with that dented rather than knobbly skin.
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Cairns
4th July 2011 5:07pm
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peter says...
hi bj,
i got 9 cherimoyas from forbidden
fruits a couple of months ago and got a rollinia from them also but it was
ungrafted.
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adelaide
4th July 2011 6:07pm
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John Mc says...
Hi Mike, all good, just arrived today. Very much appreciated. Not a bad collection there. We're going to be hit with some cold fronts this week, getting down to 6deg C or so, so I'm hard at it making up some more cold covers.
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John Mc
 
4th July 2011 6:28pm
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snottiegobble says...
Thanks for the info Clive. The tree separates the follower & sucker so should I leave them alone at this stage?
The tree is looking better with being completely covered every night & most of the day. New leaves are still being produced but very slow now.
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snottiegobble
Bunbury/Busso (smackin the middle)
4th July 2011 7:11pm
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Mike says...
John, I'm glad to hear it and hope there is something useful.I have plenty more up my sleeve and 6 degrees sounds like chicken feed and even a durian or mangosteen could handle that.
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Cairns
4th July 2011 9:06pm
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Clive says...
snottiegobble, You can leave them at this stage as they are still growing slowly,well mine are.When the tree sets fruit and it ripens, the trunk will shrink,my trunks are 300 to 400 mm at the base.If the follower is too close they will push each other out at an angle, so if you leave them at this stage you can cut theold tree out with a spade , at the base, to enable the follower to fruit on the next crop and you'll have a better choice with the suckers by then.I have learned this from 2 of my trees , which I now have to support with a prop.The suckers may also be cut out with a spade and be replanted.Mine ,here , grow like mad.Two trees I started with are now nine , in 18 months, however the one I tried at Lake Macquarie did nowt for years.
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Clive
Tabulam
8th July 2011 7:31am
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snottiegobble says...
Thanks Clive, thats invaluable info for a banana growing newbie like me!
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snottiegobble
Bunbury/Busso (smackin the middle)
11th July 2011 12:24am
#UserID: 3468
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snottiegobble says...
Dont know about surviving the cold, but this papaya tent has sure survived the atrocious winds weve had all this week (along with my banana temple) Cant say the same about my greenhouse cause it was torn to shreds!
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snottiegobble
Bunbury/Busso (smackin the middle)
2nd August 2011 11:59pm
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snottiegobble says...
The once greenhouse is still in the background of the photo.
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snottiegobble
Bunbury/Busso (smackin the middle)
3rd August 2011 12:01am
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amanda says...
Nice one SG - got to get me some of those clips/clamps!! How handy are they. Looks like I will have to give u some design/building-for-the-wind lessons when I get down that way!? :D

Can't believe my shade house still fine - it's mostly held together with cable ties!? (my favourite garden tool - I have them ranging from tiny ones to about metre in length..)

We should have a comp for trees surviving the heat also Correy!?
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amanda19
Geraldton. Mide West WA.
4th August 2011 9:26am
#UserID: 2309
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Nick says...
That'd be unfair for us southerners amanda! :) When are we going to find out the winners Correy?
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Nick T
Altona, VIC
13th August 2011 9:39pm
#UserID: 2663
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snottiegobble says...
I unwrapped the pawpaw the other day cause it was lovely & warm & was amazed to find lovely creamy/white flowers at the top!
So the 'tent' not only saved the tree, but there might even be fruit this season. Even if they dont ripen I will be happy!!
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snottiegobble
Bunbury/Busso (smackin the middle)
14th August 2011 1:05am
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amanda says...
I hope u covered it back up b4 last nites weather SG! :)
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amanda19
Geraldton. Mide West WA.
14th August 2011 10:28am
#UserID: 2309
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LorellB says...
Hi this is How we got our trees to survive the cold fristly picture 7 and 8 is our lychee secondly picture 5 and 6 pashionfruit and our orchard picture 1, 2 and 3 including a malabar chestnut picture 4 the tree has new shoots its survived a lot of heavy frosts this year

we used shade cloth, steel posts and staples to close it
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LorellB
Fishermans Pocket
14th August 2011 12:05pm
#UserID: 5662
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Original Post was last edited: 14th August 2011 2:57pm
plantlover says...
so who won the competition? there's great entries
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blacktown nsw
17th August 2011 11:24am
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Mike says...
yeah would love to find out who won, if i knew about this comp i would have entered. Goodluck to those who did enter.
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Queensland
17th August 2011 11:28am
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showy10 says...
Does anyone know who won the competition?
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Vic
19th August 2011 10:17am
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showy10 says...
Does anyone know who won the competition?
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Vic
19th August 2011 10:18am
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mike says...
who won?
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24th August 2011 12:26pm
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Jason says...
Me, because all my trees that were ever going to doe from the cold died 10 years ago :P. So that's how mine survived the last 10 years
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Jason
Portland
24th August 2011 1:13pm
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mike says...
Hehe....my trees didn't survive the cold this winter, it would be nice to know who actually one so I can try their technique.....When is the winners announced?
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27th August 2011 3:06pm
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LorellB says...
Hi Mike, I havn't heard who won but we had 100% success with the shad cloth we bought 6' steel posts and then purchased the 5mt rolls of shad cloth from Bunnings we used 3 posts and dived the rolls of shad cloth in 3 pieces and put this around each plant and closed it with staples, for the bigger trees we used some old frames we had but used the same idea, I have spent the weekend uncovering and fertilizing all of me trees they look fantastic and I am so pleased even the Malabar Chesnut that doesn;t like the cold is covered in new shoots. So consider using this idea next year I can give you more instructions if you need so please email me I don't mind I love my garden, orchard and my son will tell you mum is garden mad but it is fantastic for stress relief and a super feeling when you can sit down to a meal from your garden, I have had fresh vegs for months you just change the varity for the season. So do feel defeted keep gardening we will all help you with ideas. lorellb@aapt.net.au. Regards, Lorell.
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LorellB
Fishermans Pocket
28th August 2011 5:02pm
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Nick says...
Im really keen to find out who won, there were some great entries!
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Nick T
Altona, VIC
2nd September 2011 8:02pm
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Original Post was last edited: 2nd September 2011 8:02pm
Mike says...
Correy who won the competition? Really keen you have some great entries.
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8th September 2011 11:50am
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Correy says...
@John Mc
the photo was taken during the big freeze of 2007 will never forget it.

Here was the forum entry for that day:
https://www.daleysfruit.com.au/forum/frost-protection1/
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Correy
Brisbane
13th September 2011 3:02pm
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Correy says...
1st Nick $100 voucher
2nd Clive $50 voucher
Equal 3rd John Mc & Steve $25 voucher

Big Sorry Guys I am 1 month late for the judging and as such Everyone who left their email address and submitted a solution in this forum competition. I will send you out a $10 voucher.

It took me a while to read through all these and there were about 7 that were really close.

If you haven't got the voucher just tell me by this forum or contact me at:

webmaster at daleysfruit.com.au
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Correy
Brisbane
13th September 2011 3:13pm
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Original Post was last edited: 13th September 2011 3:38pm
LorellB says...
Hi Correy we Havent recived the voucher yet our Email Address is lorellb@aapt.net.au
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LorellB
Fishermans Pocket
18th September 2011 8:03am
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