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Compost Bugs!

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Karen &amp; Paul starts with ...
Hi All, Happy Australia Day, Hope everyone had a great day off. Wonder if anyone can tell us what these disgusting looking critters are which have invaded our cheap black plastic compost bin? It's quite wet inside at the moment :-/ They start off as very plump white grubs like an oversized maggot and there were hundreds of them on one piece of banana skin all madly feeding in the one area, it looked so gross!! By the time I went out to take these photos about a week later they had turned a darker shade of brown and seem to be more scaly like now, a bit like a slaters body, but I can't see any legs and I can't identify a head from a tail or a back from a stomach - they just seem to manage to get around any which way they land. So the bin is absolutely swarming with them now. What should we do? We are actually starting to consider a couple of open bins as we are really getting into the landscape work now. We seem to have a lot of mice n bunnys around though, so would that be a dumd idea???
Thanks in advance x
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Paul Karen1
Pottsville NSW
28th January 2010 10:48am
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peter says...
hi karen and paul.
my guess would be flies.
put a couple in a jar to watc
their life cycle.
could try a seal the bin for a while so that when they hatch they will be trapped and die.
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adelaide
28th January 2010 1:17pm
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peter says...
watc should be - watch
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adelaide
28th January 2010 1:18pm
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BJ says...
I've got the same things in my bin. Appeared after I put in a bag of excess mangoes - though none were split, broken or had obvious holes that nasties to hide in. They've pretty much liquified the contents of the bin though, so adding SC mulch to see what happens.
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Theposterformerlyknownas
Brisbane
28th January 2010 1:38pm
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Karen &amp; Paul says...
Flies???? Really???? Wow I find that amazing if that weird thing is gonna turn into a fly. But yes they did look like giant maggots to begin with... hmmm perhaps we will jar a few and watch them, cool for the kids anyway, as disgusting as they are eeeekk! Yes BJ our bin has turned to liquid too it's gross.... Let us know how the SC goes.
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Paul Karen1
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28th January 2010 2:11pm
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Wayne says...
And Blow flies at that, I hate them.
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Wayne
Mackay QLD
28th January 2010 2:34pm
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Diana says...
Hi all,

Yes, I get the same in my bin. Lets face it, none of the little things living in the compost bin are going to win a beauty contest, but that's not the job we're paying them for!

The carrion beetle (3rd one along in the beetle larvae picture) apparently eats blowfly maggots as well as rotting stuff. The picture looks a bit like one of those, too. Or it could be a baby fly.

An open bin might need either a minimum one metre square volume to fry unwanted creatures with fermentation, or else constant turning to discourage them. If you have ever got a delivery of dirt or mulch, you will know that 1m squared is a lot.

Diana.
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Brisbane
28th January 2010 3:19pm
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Diana says...
Photos (I hope). Beetles on top, maggots underneath.
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Brisbane
28th January 2010 3:25pm
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Speedy says...
Karen and Paul,
what you have there is Black soldier fly larvae (Hermetia illucens).

They're really good allies for the home composter converting really wet, high nitrogen,
stinky and otherwise anaerobic and acidic messsy stuff,
a common problem with home composting efforts, into something useable.

They keep blow flies away and I suspect kill them.

At 42% protein and around 35% fat BSF larvae are great chook food,
fish food or for other small omnivorous livestock.

I like these guys in my compost bins, always have.

They also handle meat really well.....
watch this and keep an eye on the clock on the lower RHS...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C-zAbzRx29I
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Nth Vic
28th January 2010 5:04pm
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Violet_Cactus says...
WOW! Speedy, that video is amazing!
I wish I had some of those guys in my compost bin.
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VioletCactus1
Melbourne
29th January 2010 12:30am
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Karen &amp; Paul says...
Thanks speedy now I feel even sicker... but nonetheless comforted by your expertise once again. I had to laugh when I saw your reply as when I took the photo I said to Paul "I know exactly who will have the complex answer for this one...... Speedy!"
So I guess we'll just let them do their thing in there. Yes you described our bin to a tee, we've found it challenging to get the mix right with not a lot of garden waste to add just yet. So it's mainly kitchen scraps and lawn clippings with the odd pee from Paul. Perhaps until we get some growth happening we'd be better feeding the scraps to a couple of chooks or worm farm??
Ok here's one for you Speedy - two kids home with the mumps!! Any ideas??
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Paul Karen1
Pottsville NSW
29th January 2010 7:35am
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Brad says...
you might try get some bales of any old cheap straw and throw that in the compost with what's in there. Shredded newspaper is an alternative if you've got it.
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Brad2
Como, Perth
29th January 2010 12:33pm
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Dokta Speedy says...
Sorry to hear that the kids have mumps.
Better they get it now that later in life (I'm guessing they're primary school age)
The virus and it's symptoms just has to run it's course.
It's contaigous for about 1-2 weeks after onset of symptoms...(and about a week before)
It would have been contracted anywhere up to 3 weeks before.
give the kids soft and bland foods so as not to stimulate the salivary glands too much I guess,
but you're probably on top of it anyway.
I hope they get well soon.

Disclaimer:- the information given here is not from a trained medical practitioner and therefore should not be treated as such.... :-P
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Nth Vic
29th January 2010 5:06pm
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Wayne says...
Well Speedy, looks like my guess was wrong.
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Wayne
Mackay QLD
29th January 2010 5:32pm
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Julie says...
Brad, you beat me to it! I was going to suggest shredded newspaper. Anything dry would improve the mix - dry grass,dead leaves etc.

One problem with a wet, mushy mix is it could turn out to be quite acid. Depending on your soil, that could be a good or a bad thing.

I don't have huge quantities of stuff to compost - no lawn clippings etc. So I turn all my food scraps into fertiliser with Eco Bokashi. This is done in a 20 litre bucket and produces a fairly sloppy mixture which you dig into your garden. Every now and then it has hundreds of the same maggots you have, so they must be attracted to wet conditions.

Alternatively, as you mention,a worm farm is great for a small family. I find the Bokashi method less work, but I used to love the crumbly mix I got from a worm farm.

Good luck with whatever method you decide on. Composting can be a challenge which takes a bit of experience to get right!

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Roleystone WA
29th January 2010 6:58pm
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Karen &amp; Paul says...
haha gotta love google hey Speedy :-) I've only got little tackers 22 month old broke out first and 4 year old today :-) oh the joys. Anyway yes they are both over the worst of it already I think, we breed em tough, still off their food but back on the trampoline so things can't be too bad :-) I think you're doing better than the local quack who told my girlfriend that her boy had a swollen lymph gland a fortnight ago... meanwhile he's infected half of Pottsville. Oh well tick that one off the list, one less we have to get once we start schooling :-)
I will add some SC mulch this weekend and see if that helps to dry up some of the slush :-/ Still watching our captured specimen with fascination.
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Paul Karen1
Pottsville NSW
29th January 2010 6:59pm
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Karen &amp; Paul says...
Thanks Julie I have looked at the Bokashi before but we have a pretty small kitchen with limited benchspace so I'm leaning more toward the worms. We've had a lot of rain past 24 hours so all my SC bales are wet, I might try the shredded paper actually. Lifted the lid today to see how they were progressing and there was a small garden snake in there, hopefully he had some for lunch :-)
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Paul Karen1
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29th January 2010 7:04pm
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Julie says...
Karen and Paul, I don't keep it in the kitchen - yuk! I have a 2L bin I empty into the 20L bucket every couple of days. This is outside under shadecloth. There is another bucket underneath to catch drips. Just thought I'd clear that up!
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Roleystone WA
29th January 2010 7:13pm
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Karen &amp; Paul says...
Oh ok it looked to me like a small kitchen accessory when I saw it a few years ago... Yeah that sounds ok if it's kept outside :-)
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Paul Karen1
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29th January 2010 7:28pm
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Speedy says...
You could just keep going with the Black Soldier fly larvae,
after all they're way more robust and a lot less fussy than compost worms.
In fact they're probably much better suited to the 'average home composting situation' than worms are.
particularly in hot weather/climates.
BSF seem to eat faster the hotter it gets, while worms shut down and can easily die at mid 30s and hotter,
especially if things are a bit out of balance.

I'd just add sawdust to it (bin) and keep throwing the food scraps in it
and add a bit of lime, dolomite or old cement dust occasionally.
BSF larvae eat almost anything.
the sawdust would even out moisture levels
BSF also do the job of turning and aerating the compost for you.
Once you add sawdust to the system It should help reduce any odours.
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Nth Vic.
30th January 2010 2:33am
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amanda says...
Great thread guys! Speedy - I have not a living thing in my Gedys bin!? (not anything I can see anyway) Is this OK?

I put worms and manure into them to get them started and then throw everything in (dead rabbits etc) I pretty much treat it as a place to stick everything the chooks don't eat (eg: pizza boxes, toilet roll cardboard etc)

I really treat them as "out of mind out of sight" - but they breakdown ok? The aim for me was NO hassle! :-) as I don't have time - but wanted to keep the biomass on the block. I don't put it dirctly around my trees as it's an "unknown quantity" ;-) (too many bones as well he he)

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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
30th January 2010 12:54pm
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Julie says...
Karen and Paul, the bucket you can buy from the Bokashi people is not all that large (?) and quite expensive.

I bought a 20L bucket from Bunnings and put a plastic irrigation tap on the bottom. At first I probably didn't add enough EB, so it was a bit smelly. I learned to be a bit more generous, and it now works well. Bit slower in winter though. Seething with maggots right now!
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30th January 2010 7:33pm
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Violet_Cactus says...
The Bokashi Bucket web site says:

"The key to the success of this system is the specifically designed Bokashi Bucket, and the use of EM Bokashi.

Bokashi is a Japanese term that means “fermented organic matter. EM Bokashi is a pleasant smelling product made using a combination of sawdust and bran that has been infused with Effective Micro-organisms (EM). EM Bokashi has traditionally been used to increase the microbial diversity and activity in soils and to supply nutrients to plants."

Does anyone know if it's possible to make your own EM bokashi substitute?

(Speedy?)
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VioletCactus1
Melbourne
31st January 2010 1:07am
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Speedy says...
Amanda, How you use the gedye bin is sort of how I use them, I have a few of them around the place in various stages of filling and maturing.
Don't worry, there'll be stuff living in there if things are breaking down ok.
Bones are easy, you calcine them.
When you come to use the compost, seive it and set aside the bones and shells (oysters, mussells etc).
Stack them in a drum in alternate layers with some firewood and set fire to it.
When its all cool the bones can be easily crushed between your hands
or a couple of blocks of wood and returned to the garden (via compost again if you like).
It's a source of Ca, Mg and Phos and other trace elements.
even the biggest bones can be broken down , bovine skulls and femurs... you can dissappear whole skeletons real easy.
so with Worms, Black soldier fly larvae, compost and fire, you've got just about all you need to deal with most organic waste.

as for bokashi, I haven't used it myself, but it appears to be a mix of different Lactbacillus sp. and a few others I believe.
If that is the case then how they'd work is that they'd colonize the food scraps with the organisms preventing putrifying organisms to take hold and also 'Pickle' them by dropping the pH.

If i was to try making it up, I'd try a mix of rice or wheat bran, molasses and water,
maybe a bit of seaweed and inoculate it with some bokashi and allow it to ferment for a few days and try that out.

like you do with milk and yoghurt but with bran.

Just think of Japanese nuka box pickles.
A wooden box full of moist rice bran with a bit of koji culture, molds , yeasts, Lactobacillus spp.
bury vegetables in it and dig them out a day or two later and yumm.
thats what bokashi reminds me of... the microbes living in rice bran
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Nth Vic.
31st January 2010 2:40am
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Karen &amp; Paul says...
Ok while we're on the subject of creatures in the compost... what about snakes??? We had them at the old house so when we moved here we stopped adding eggshells in case that was attracting them and now we have them back here too. They are small (about 1 foot long and as fat as your pointer finger) light tan/pale green in colour with a mouth and eyes like a snake. I add this because Paul has questioned if they may be a kind of worm???... I'm pretty sure they are snakes. There is just the odd sighting, once a fortnight say. If I can coax one out I will try and snap a pic. I'm surprised they have entered at the moment with the BSF larvae so active... perhaps they are yummy to snakes?
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Paul Karen1
Pottsville NSW
31st January 2010 9:14am
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Violet_Cactus says...
Yikes, Karen and Paul, there's a lot of wildlife around your place, some of it fairly scary :)
Speedy, your gardening knowledge is amazing. Thanks for the disappearing skeletons recipe. That calcined stuff would be great for the soil.
Thanks, too, for the ideas on Make-Your-Own bokashi. I'm sure traditional Japanese farmers didn't go to the supermarket every time they needed more, so that must be how it's done.
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VioletCactus1
Melbourne
31st January 2010 11:57am
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amanda says...
Ta Speedy! sounds like a great way to get rid of "dead bodies"... ;-) Karen - they are not legless lizards are they? They look just like a small snake too. Mine are very sleek and shiny light tan also.
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
31st January 2010 4:49pm
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Diana says...
Hi Karen & Paul,

Eggshells are not likely to attract any Australian snakes, and our snakes do not eat insects (with the exception of some weird, uncommon specialists like blind snakes, which eat bull ant eggs and pupae). Smaller Australian snakes usually eat lizards or frogs, and some larger ones eat mammals. Brown snakes and taipans like to eat mice, and pythons (non-venomous) will eat mice and lizards.

If there is a small snake hanging around your compost bin, it might be after mice, lizards, or a warm spot to sit or lay eggs. If it has eyes it is not a worm. There are lots of snakes it could be, it's hard to say without a picture. Juvenile brown snakes have bands, it's most likely too small to be an adult one of those, but it might be something else venomous so keep your distance while taking a photo (and don't try to kill it!).

A legless lizard in subtropical eastern Australia near a house would most likely be a burton's legless lizard, which has a very distinctive pointy face (picture), and lives all over Australia. They are lovely things.

Diana.

PS I know more about distinguishing features of lizards than maggots.
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31st January 2010 8:25pm
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Julie says...
Karen and Paul, don't know if you can be bothered, but I use my egshells this way.

I rinse the shells and let them dry, then store in an ice cream container. When I have enough, I grind them up in the food processor. I add this bit by bit to the Bokashi mixture - or I used to put it in the worm farm.

Not as time-consuming as it sounds, I only do it about every three months or so. I'm sure it is more available this way.

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1st February 2010 7:39pm
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Karen &amp; Paul says...
Thanks Diana... I considered juvenile brown snake actually as we do get a lot of them around here. I was pleased to leave the old house and them behind...so was a bit surprised and cranky to find one in there again. We have had a lot of heavy rain over the past week and there is no sign of anyone creeping around in there at the moment. Hopefully they've moved on but nonetheless I'll keep takin the scraps out with camera... murpheys law I'd see one the day I stop!
Julie you are very committed to your composting, I'm impressed! Sounds like a good job for the kids :-) they'll love it thanks!
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Paul Karen1
Pottsville NSW
7th February 2010 10:18pm
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Karen &amp; Paul says...
Diana I just had another thought when I stepped out there this morning to do some wet weather weed pulling I disturbed about 7 tiny baby cane toads... eugh!! Oh I hate the horrible things even when they are only the size of a 10 cent coin. They were right by the bin so they must be breeding nearby? Which would surprise me as there is no permanent water store there (besides the mushy slushy compost mix) and we have had torrential rain. Anyone you know particularly fond of them for dinner? :-) The wet weather sure has coaxed them out YUCK they are everywhere... disgusting creatures!
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Paul Karen1
Pottsville NSW
7th February 2010 10:26pm
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Wayne says...
A squirt bottle of Pine-o-clean or bleach or concentrated disinfectant fixes their wagon Karen

One spray and they're gone
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Wayne
Mackay QLD
8th February 2010 7:59am
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Diana says...
Hi Karen and Paul,

Cane toads are very good travellers, especially when it rains of course. We had lots in the yard before we had a pond- they don't need to live near water so you might not be breeding them at your place. They are probably sheltering under the moist compost and eating the insects.
I'm in favour of killing them humanely, even though they're awful pests. Chemicals on the skin would be a horrific death for any frog or toad. Apparently some crows can eat them.

Diana.
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8th February 2010 10:25am
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Wayne says...
Anything that eats them dies a horrible death Diana, they have decimated much of our wildlife so I don't feel one bit sorry for them. They eat anything that moves, including frogs.

Some people catch and freeze them if you want to be humane about it.
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Wayne
Mackay QLD
8th February 2010 12:06pm
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Karen &amp; Paul says...
WEAK STOMACHS BE WARNED - DISGUSTING CANE TOAD TALES!!!

Yes I have heard of the freeze thing but I couldn't bring myself to handle one of the disgusting creatures hehehehe "and she wants to be a gardener?" I can hear you saying... YES but we all have our limits :-)
At present I see one, do a funny sideways jump and squeal and pretend I never saw it... funnily my reaction seems to be enough to move them on...
Oh I wish there was another way. We have planted our good bug mix all over the place yet I feel these little bastards are probably undoing all that good... (scuse the french I HATE THEM!!)
My neighbour goes for the cricket bat approach eugh!He told me about one sucking it's guts back in and carrying on with it's disgusting life last week YUCK!
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Paul Karen1
Pottsville NSW
10th April 2010 1:24pm
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amanda says...
Hey Karen - you can bet there will be a damn cane toad humane society b4 too long!?...I agree tho' - we did the golf method. Maybe our Qld cousins have some ideas?
Sad to hear they are down your way - they are in the Kimberlies now - we now have mud crabs in Gero!? (central west coast) wonder if the crocs n toads will make it here too??
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
10th April 2010 1:40pm
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Karen &amp; Paul says...
hahaha Amanda we just my best girlfriend here. She married a Norwegian 3 years ago and we've lost her to the other side of the planet. Her husband would not put a toe in our gorgeous estuary/creek which runs out to the ocean through fear of croc's hehehehehehe there was absolutely no convincing him that they are 2000km's away!
Surely there will never be any "save the canetoad" calling... that would be the last straw, then I would definately head for the hills!
Hope that big storm didn't reach up your way? Was thinkin of my Perth buddies x
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Paul Karen1
Pottsville NSW
10th April 2010 1:51pm
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Karen &amp; Paul says...
Actually I've got it Amanda! Maybe the crocs would be the only ones able to gobble em up and not curl over... Perhaps we should introduce a few into the creek? hehehe
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Paul Karen1
Pottsville NSW
10th April 2010 1:54pm
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amanda says...
LOL! I don't think there is much we can do about the cane toad :-(( Looks like biological warfare will be the only way..maybe we could get that famous fisherman to kiss them and they will get herpes virus like the south coast sardines...????
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
10th April 2010 1:58pm
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BJ says...
There was a study recently that found that cat food was great at killing cane toads. Apparently cane toads and a certain type of meat ant are both attracted to the cat food. The ants happily devour the cane toad as well. It is supposed to simply introduce a predator to the cane toad and remove said cane toad. Sounds like a good option to me!
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BJ11
WA
10th April 2010 4:38pm
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Karen &amp; Paul says...
Oh thanks BJ I'm gonna persue this one as we seem to have an abundance of all different species of ants around here. Cheers :-)
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Paul Karen1
Pottsville NSW
10th April 2010 4:59pm
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Pedro says...
Hi, just wondering if you have any or know where to get any BSF in Melbourne? Thank you
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Pedro3
Melbourne
11th October 2012 9:17pm
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Julie says...
I used to have thousands, but I think they must have died on one hot (34c) day about 10 days ago. So disappointed!

I keep my Bokashi bucket under shadecloth in summer, then move out into the sun in winter. The hot weather caught me by surprise - it's now under shadecloth. Hope they return.


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Julie
Roleystone WA
11th October 2012 9:32pm
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Kevin W says...
I am after some Black Soldier Fly larvae to kick off my BSF harvester. Anyone willing to post me some in a small takeaway plastic food container..I would be appreciative. Phone 0249487369 will pay you for it.
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Kevin W
Tingira Heights NSW
26th November 2013 9:01am
#UserID: 8375
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Original Post was last edited: 26th November 2013 9:08am
Julie says...
Kevin, I'm in WA, but posted a container successfully to Victoria some time ago.

Can you let me know your email? It's safe to post on public forums if you do it like this:

Kevin at service provider dot com dot au
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Julie
Roleystone WA
26th November 2013 9:15pm
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Julie says...
Aah! You ignored my advice! I'll be in touch.
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Julie
Roleystone WA
28th November 2013 3:13pm
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Kevin W says...
Julie, Thanks

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Kevin W
Tingira Heights NSW
10th December 2013 4:48pm
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Original Post was last edited: 10th December 2013 4:48pm
RobynP says...
These are black soldier fly larvae. They are amazingly fast composters which thrive in a very wet compost bin. They make the compost quite acidic, so correct this with lime before using. My chooks love them!
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RobynP
Holland Park
31st March 2016 3:57pm
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Julie says...
Did you read any of the comments? This was answered six years ago!

On testing the 'juice' from the bin, it was around 9 to 9.5. I checked it because I wanted to know why seedlings died soon after I fed them with this. I killed a blueberry and almost lost my gardenias - both need acid soil. So I'm curious that you say it is acidic.
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Julie
Roleystone WA
1st April 2016 1:49pm
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Original Post was last edited: 1st April 2016 1:50pm
mcmelb1 says...
Hi there,
I live in Melbourne and am looking for some Black Soldier Fly Larvae to start a composting system. If you have any that you could sell, please message me at marcusyuguang at gmail dot com.
Thanks!
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mc1
SOUTH YARRA,3141,VIC
23rd February 2017 2:15pm
#UserID: 14853
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Markmelb says...
marcus - If you start up a worm farm composting system you will get them naturally - dont know how mine got them but they help break down the scraps as fast as the worms in there - maybe their eggs were in some garden soil i put in initially or old potting mixes in small amounts.
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Markmelb
MOUNT WAVERLEY,3149,VIC
24th February 2017 8:46am
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Brain says...
I second MarkMelb, in the hot summer months just pasted, I had a bit of the Black Soldier Fly Larvae in the worm farm. In fact, I've been told they are a bit of a pest in worm farms and have been getting rid of them when I see them.

I think all it took was to open the lid a bit and the females would lay its eggs there. Especially if the bin is full of food and moist and a bit acidic.
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Brain
Brisbane
27th February 2017 3:25pm
#UserID: 6289
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coolbreeze says...
Hey All,

Apart from kitchen scraps, will the BSF larvae consume garden waste as well? By garden waste I am particularly meaning grass clippings and dried leaves? Mainly brown matter though. I don't want to add a layer of brown matter if it will slow them down or stop them composting altogether.
And how long do they normally hang around for until moving on? I know their life cycle is fairly short, but it seems pretty continuous at present. Will it be all summer long? Can I turn the compost with them there or is it best to wait until they have moved along?
At the moment the top layer of kitchen scraps is getting broken down extremely fast. I'm afraid it could be getting too thick and dense for later use. Normally I add a layer of dry leaves once the kitchen scrap layer builds up. But since the BSF larvae have arrived - they have been eating the scraps nonstop and I haven't had to add another layer yet. It's been going for close to 2 months now.
What would be the best thing to do at this time?
- continue with the kitchen scraps
- start turning even with the BSF larvae there
- just add layer of leaves like normal
- stop adding anything and wait for them to move along

Before the arrival of the BSF, I just did composting in a Bunnings compost bin. Nice and simple. Layering green garden waste, kitchen scraps then brown garden waste. A good drenching between layers. Then turning it every 3 layers before repeating entire process. So the BSF maggots have quite frankly... thrown a spanner in the works. Any tips, advice or ideas would be good to hear.
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coolbreeze
Riverhills
6th February 2018 10:58pm
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Original Post was last edited: 6th February 2018 11:01pm
Beestie says...
The difference between cane toad predators suffering awful deaths and humans inflicting awful deaths upon cane toads is that toads, like all (non-human) animals have no capacity for moral choice. They are what they are, and they do what they do not from vengefulness, avarice, dishonesty, etc. We may need to kill the toad, but we have the capacity to choose compassion or cruelty. Derisive comments will be as water off this well-accustomed vegan duck's back :)
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Beestie
Maroubra
4th March 2019 7:23am
#UserID: 19890
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brad16 says...
Oh Beestie, you signed up especially for that?

I think those who pout about morality are the ones who need to check it.
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brad16
GOROKAN,2263,NSW
4th March 2019 4:09pm
#UserID: 14079
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denise1 says...
Sometimes we get larvae in our compost of the hover fly. (in NZ) Specially when there is lots of grass clippings all soggy. They are a very useful fly in the garden. They appear friendly too as they will happily land on an outstretched finger if you wait long enough. They will happily stay while bringing it close to your face. They dart and hover and look similar to bees as they are quite bulky. The large larvae are leathery and hairy.
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denise1
auckland NZ
4th March 2019 9:00pm
#UserID: 6832
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Original Post was last edited: 4th March 2019 9:01pm
Brain says...
A year on since my post and let just say I have learnt to live with soldiers fly larvae. I have far worst pests to deal with - ants!

Anyway, I would suggest do what you normally do, add greens and browns. Turning the compost won’t hurt them, as the larvae has a pretty tough exoskeleton. They can also wiggle through deep earth, so a few leaves won’t stop them.

As for life cycle, I am no expert, but I am going to guess 2-3 weeks. Dr google should know. So no point in waiting, as they will always be around.

Think of them as accelerators, they just break things down faster, so that you can have faster compost. :).
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Brain
Brisbane
4th March 2019 10:40pm
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