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Grapevine problems

    59 responses

Nina starts with ...
My grapevine seems to be losing most of its leaves and looks very unhealthy (was very healthy about 3 weeks ago), why is this? Is it due to too much rain/not enough sun? do i need to fertilize it? or has it got a disease.

The vine is quite old (am unsure of exact age) but the is the first year since I've been living here that it has got any fruit. There are many bunches of grapes but they are small and seem to shrivel before going ripe - I am assuming the lack of sun has had something to do with this. I am unsure of variety - but the grapes are red with a muscatel type quality to them but are not sweet yet.

any advise would be deeply appreciated as inherited vine when moved into my house and am novice about grapes.
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Nina
QLD
15th January 2011 1:48pm
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chris says...
hi,
couldn't open the document to view.
tough growing grapes in QLD.
they really need a dry summer to ripen evenly. Despite them being bursting with juice, they are surprisingly not that water hungry.
The description of the leaves sounds like any number of fungal problems that would be running rampant with the wet weather.
My best bunches of grapes this year, are those slightly sheltered from the rain. They don't need direct sun to ripen.
Too late to spray anything. Wait until the vine is dormant. now isn't the time to fertilise either. They also don't need much in the way of fertiliser compared with say citrus.
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Chris
sydney
15th January 2011 3:33pm
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Original Post was last edited: 15th January 2011 3:34pm
Nina says...
Hi Chris,
thanks for your advice.
here's some images. any clues?
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Nina
QLD
15th January 2011 5:20pm
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chris says...
Probably black rot. if there is white cotton like fluff on the underside of the leaves... then it's downy mildew. Looks more the former.
important now to clean up diseased fruit off the ground and off the vine at the end of the season to try and prevent it hibernating in the soil till next season.
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Chris
sydney
15th January 2011 7:27pm
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amanda says...
Nina - it might be good to move that mulch well away from the trunk and clear some of the grass away too. Maybe give it some trace elements - it looks a bit pale for some reason. Heavy rainfall can leach soils.
What are u watering it with - scheme or bore?
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amanda19
Geraldton Mid West WA
16th January 2011 4:11am
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kert says...
It looks like Botrytis ,aka "noble rot". Match the image and see if it is identical to yours.
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sydney
16th January 2011 5:23pm
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Nina says...
I use bore water. do you know if this will effect it badly?

The grapes didn't appear to have the furriness that seems to appear with noble rot. Photo attached. How does one organically treat rot?

I have another grape vine nearer to the house. It is growing up the "patio" - guess most of roots are under bricks. much the same is happening to this vine as well, but it doesn't look quite as unhealthy as one in pictures above.

hmmmm..
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Nina
QLD
19th January 2011 11:53am
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kert says...
Grapes are fussy about salinity but short of doing electrical conductivity one cannot say for sure. Does your bore water taste salty ? Alas ,noble rot is not treatable organically even though I've tried sulphur and copper sprays . Rest assured that store- bought grapes will have been treated with fungicide.
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sydney
19th January 2011 2:07pm
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Janine says...
I am trying to find out what is wrong with the leaves on my grapevine, is it black rot or mildrew and what can I do for it? Have attached photos
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Janine
Sth Gippsland VIC
24th March 2011 1:15pm
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amanda says...
They look really burnt Janine?...have u had a cold snap? Have you fertilised recently (and maybe not watered it in enough?) - or is your water and/or soil salty?
A potassium deficieny could be the other possibility - what's your soil like - sandy or clay?
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amanda19
Geraldton. Mid West WA
24th March 2011 1:39pm
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adamus says...
They look like two varieties of mine this year. one missed the destruction, and two succumbed. It looks like rust, which a lot of commercial varieties get when a more than usual rainfall happens. I've got an Italian Variety called Fragola Red,(strawberry red), and it's immune from most of the diseases that the commercial crowd gets. I got no fruit on the affected vines, and then all the leaves finally dropped off.
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adamus
Armidale
24th March 2011 5:33pm
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Steven says...
My grape vines look the same, as do most people i know. Mine were full of flowers, then fruit but its all dropped off.

Most likely your problem is the same, its been very wet and humid this season and many things are getting attacked by fungi. I had to spray my tomatos and cut the back like mad several times so they wouldnt die. If your concerned spray then with a copper fungicide but once the leaves drop off they should be ok next season.
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Steven
Eastern Melbourne
25th March 2011 12:11am
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kert says...
Most probably downey mildew but show us a lightly affected leaf ,first. HINT -don't offer advice if all you have in your possession is "Did you water and fertilise it" or "it could be potassium deficiency ". That's just all- purpose advice and clogs up the site.
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sydney
25th March 2011 9:39am
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Peter says...
In a way we are all guessing as we do not have the plant in front of us. But would agree with the people saying it is a fungal problem. This is so likely because of the humidity, which grape vines can't deal with it very well and mostly fungi of all sorts take advantage of it...
However, I would also take into account the advise given about correct water supply and fertilisation, as this is crucial to the plant health. Lets say if a plant is stressed because of a nutrient deficiency, then this plant is more vulnerable to attack by pathogens.
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Peter36
Perth
25th March 2011 10:55am
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amanda says...
Well, for it's worth Peter - I agree - a plant that is stressed in some way by a deficiency will be more likely to succumb to pathogens. Could be a matter of - which came first the chicken or the egg.
If you have had a wet time of it then uptake of potassium can be restricted by this. It is also readily leached. If the deficiency is bad enough then the leaves will drop off.
How long have u had this vine Janine?

PS - kert is a troller...be careful here...
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amanda19
Geraldton. Mid West WA
25th March 2011 3:58pm
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kert sydney says...
Nooo, if a plant is given too much nitrogen it has green sappy growth that is susceptible to disease. One should avoid rote answers ,if possible as it connotes a deficiency of knowledge.PS I doubt there is any area of Queensland that has not had sufficient watering
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25th March 2011 4:26pm
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Peter says...
Interesting discussion and I keep thinking about the problem of plant diseases caused by providing such optimum conditions that this becomes the problem - like pest attacks in well-looked-after greenhouse plants. So the green sappy growth achieved by giving too much nitrogen for example will be truly more susceptible than slower growing plant tissue. I think, that all our points are valid somehow, but it is all very complex and there is not only the nutrition status of the plant and interaction between plant and one suspected pathogen to consider, but also the interaction between different pathogens taking advantage of the stressed plant. Who can put all these puzzle pieces together? Knowbody should be afraid of deficiency of knowledge as this is a normal situation when dealing with plant health.
However, the discussion might not help Nina and her grapevine.
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Peter36
Perth
25th March 2011 6:57pm
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Jason says...
I'll go with the theory of keeping the plant growing fast enough to keep the vulnerable growth up and out of the way of disease but everyone can have their own theory. So long s your plants are growing well it must be the right thing to do
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Jason
Portland
25th March 2011 7:31pm
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amanda says...
Oh kert - u must be bored again mate. Anyway - I have never seen a powdery/downey mildew that attacks a grape vine leaf from the "margins inwards" ?
I am happy to be proved wrong (but must be "cited references" from kurt however - cos I don't believe anything he says without lots of salt added... ;-)
Google some Images:
Eg
Grape vine downey mildew images
or
potassium deficieny images
or
salinity toxicity images

Heaps of good helpful pics on google if u ask the right questions.

I'd be happy to research - but I am on satellite broadband and it's quite expensive for me to keep researching links for people :(
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amanda19
Geraldton. Mid West WA
26th March 2011 2:15am
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Original Post was last edited: 26th March 2011 2:35am
kert says...
Never mind about "from the margin inwards " I have the impression that you have one arrow in your quivver viz "do you water and fertilise your plant regularly?" which you deploy to every question in order to be able to respond to practically everything . Don't believe me ? Check the record. PS What do they call that ? Oh, I know, Miss. Narcissism
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sydney
28th March 2011 10:26am
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amanda says...
LOL! U are a silly billy kert. Part of solving/determining a problem is to "gather all the facts" first - but u wouldn't understand that would you...

I also asked:
Have you fertilised recently (and maybe not watered it in enough?)
Quite a different question - but anyway - u will interpret your own way - as you are wont to do....

It can be quite difficult to guess at a new members experience level - and also difficult to ask the first-up questions without insulting their intelligence.....so I figure it's best to go softly, softly and find out the basics first....its' called tact and diplomacy...
But...once again - u wouldn't understand that either would u...

So, who is the narcissist now..?
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amanda19
Geraldton. Mid West WA
28th March 2011 11:31am
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Brad says...
do we have to bite every time?
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Brad2
G Hill,Perth
28th March 2011 12:15pm
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snottiegobble says...
Not even an official site user with an ID. Should be banned!
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snottiegobble
 
28th March 2011 12:28pm
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amanda says...
Hi Brad - I am not biting - just have a big tongue in my cheek! I guess it's immature of me I admit - but I am just having fun/sport..?
I think S.G is too...? :)

Although - I am quite happy to stop if the majority would like it so...?
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amanda19
Geraldton. Mid West WA
28th March 2011 1:20pm
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Xiem says...
No, whatever you do, don't stop. I enjoy such discourse especially on a forum like this. It breaks the monotony of reading about chewed yellow leaves and unfruitful fruit trees.
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Diego
 
28th March 2011 2:28pm
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Original Post was last edited: 28th March 2011 2:35pm
snottiegobble says...
But I havent taken time off, Skirt! Just take a look at Asparagus/natural cure thread.
Xiem, unfortunately our fun is being foiled by discriminate deletions. but I will do my best!
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snottiegobble
 
28th March 2011 4:48pm
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adamus says...
So have we discounted the "rust" suggestion from me.? It really looks like rust, and rust happens very easily with higher than average rainfall.
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adamus
Armidale
28th March 2011 5:44pm
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Wayne says...
"So have we discounted the "rust" suggestion from me"

Kert has taken all common sense out of this thread adamus, you could well be right but I know nothing about grapes
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Wayne
Mackay QLD
28th March 2011 5:58pm
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snottiegobble says...
My one vine that I planted as a seedling last winter took off like mad spring & early summer, but now has dappled leaves, burned edged leaves & healthy leaves. I put it all down to heat stress & possible ongoing lack of nutrients in this W.A soily sand that I am not used to yet! I will know better next spring!
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snottiegobble
 
29th March 2011 12:12am
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adamus says...
Thanks Wayne, I'm beginning to see the picture.
And Snotty, it's always hard getting to know the soil in a new location, but perth has it's own special surprises. It broke my heart in '83 when I was there.
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adamus
Armidale
29th March 2011 7:07am
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kert says...
Yes , Folks . This is what knowledge looks like ;it's unmistakable . "To check for downey mildew take an unaffected leaf ,place it in a plastic bag with a few drops of water and then place the lot in a warm spot ,say on top of a water heater, overnight. Examine in the morning for "oil spots" A positive result is presence of seeming oily areas". Oh, and do you water and fertilise your vine regularly?
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sydney
29th March 2011 10:44am
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chris says...
I think a problem that crops up in this forum is that many ignore the fact that growing conditions are different from their own--between sand, clay and loam. eg. sand holds little moisture vv clay. And also that pest and disease problems are also influenced by our climate. Those in the tropics have a different set of issues to deal with then those in temperate zones, different again from those in dry climates and different from those in cooler zones.
Hence I find discussions among fellow gardeners in your area, whether online or in person, far more helpful when dealing with issues.
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Chris
Sydney
29th March 2011 1:55pm
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snottiegobble says...
Yes Chris, I agree & that is why I always expect users to include their vicinity when they post. Sometimes ( for no reason) it gets deleted but is easily rectified by logging out & starting again as I have just done.( hell, hope it works!)
Kert is it at all possible for you to give advice without some form of sarcasm??
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snottiegobble
Bunbury/Busso ( smack in the middle)
29th March 2011 2:13pm
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amanda says...
Last summer I had the same problem as Janine (salinity burn in my case) - with burnt margins ..."then" the powdery mildew set in also...

This summer I doubled the amount of water to both vines and there have been no burnt margins. I didn't get around to spraying for moulds - but have been free of them this year too - lucky considering this summer has been a notably humid one....

Yes kert - I do agree that the vine has a mould or mildew - but - I don't feel it is the only problem it has. Time will tell I guess.
(Nifty trick BTW!)
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amanda19
Geraldton. Mid West WA
29th March 2011 5:24pm
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adamus says...
And also Snotty, some of us have travelled, and indeed lived in some other areas, if not now, so we have some idea about them when we read, so we can comment with authority.
I've lived in Perth for some time, in Melbourne for about 16 years, in sydney for 20 years, and in Brisbane for 10 years. I've even lived in India for 5 years, so these are really different climates. I now live in the coldest of Australian Climates, and like people in Darwin, I've had to rethink what I grow and when. But I still know what it's like to grow Tomatoes in Darwin, or Sydney.
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adamus
Armidale
29th March 2011 10:26pm
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amanda says...
Well - I just googled "salinity in Gippsland Soils"
Here is a big DPI document (no - I have not read) - but it may contain useful info...

http://www.dpi.vic.gov.au/DPI/Vro/wgregn.nsf/pages/wg_lwm_wg_sal_mgt

A quick cut n paste for South Gippsland:

The key outcomes of the limited implementation of the strategy to date has been an improved
understanding of the extent and effect of salinity, information on the causes of the problem and
advice to farmers on how to manage salt affected land. However, the specific local causes of
salinity are still not well understood especially the groundwater flow systems contributing to
dryland salinity. Consequently, there has been little strategic effort in implementing control
options that address the cause of the problem (eg tree planting).
As discussed later in this plan, the salinity occurring in the South Gippsland region is generally a
private cost and remedial options are likely to involve a substantial landowner input. Therefore,
building the capacity of landowners to take ownership of the problem and solution is crucial to a
successful salinity management program in the area.

Sorry - that's all I have time for right now...hope it's also useful Janine... :)
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amanda19
Geraldton. Mid West WA
30th March 2011 1:17am
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Original Post was last edited: 30th March 2011 1:30am
Janine says...
Thanks all for your comments. I have only had the plant in for about 8 weeks and we have had a lot of rain here in the past 4 weeks so it could be combination of a few things. Since I emailed, the remaining leaves have fallen off that look like this and there is new growth appearing. Maybe it was just sunburnt! I have been fertislising and am still keeping a eye out for anything different. Thanks ago all, most useful
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Janine
Sth Gippsland VIC
7th April 2011 1:04pm
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kert says...
I very much want to grow grapes but,so far, little success. Major problems are birds that will devote a whole day ,if necessary, to get at the grapes; troublesome but solvable. Then there are three diseases anthracnose, powdery mildew ,downey mildew. The first is tackled with Ziram . Powdery mildew responds to sulphur or to potassium bicarbonate. Downey mildew copper sprays, phosphonates or mancozeb. A lot of spraying but anything from a shop will be equally sprayed. To anticipate the suggestion of disease resistant varieties ,my observation is they are not very tasty and not highly disease resistant.
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sydney
7th April 2011 5:38pm
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John Mc says...
You anticipated right, Kert. What's happening with your muscadines? Mine are thriving. Absolutely going beserk. I have some nice Adonis ripening up soon, they are a good size although a little sparse.
I have three varieties which are all doing extremly well, no need to spray at all, contrary to my european varieties.
One thing I don't know, what they taste like, but it won't be long now.
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John Mc
 
7th April 2011 5:59pm
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kert says...
I have a big crop of Daleys original muscadines which I'm now told are definitely not Adonis and a whole bunch of seedlings with more possible parentage than a nymphomaniac pole dancer's offspring. Daley;s muscadine is merely a curiousity and really does not equate to Vitis vinifera.Nonetheless they are all thriving and perhaps something good will emerge.
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sydney
7th April 2011 6:12pm
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John Mc says...
Yes, well I'm switching my attention towards the Muscadines for now. They started out as a curiosity but are now getting my attention mainly because of their vigorous nature and no diseases so far. They airlayer very easily which is a bonus.
I have three , Bronze, Achillis, and Adonis, and am waiting for the other three, Dixie, Fry and Noble that Daley's have in production.
I've always wanted to grow Muscadines but I've never been able to source any growing stock till recently.
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John Mc
 
7th April 2011 6:43pm
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John Mc says...
Just tried a couple of ripe Adonis Muscadines. Very nice indeed. When ripe, they develop this slight translucent look. Quite sweet with the slightest hint of muskiness. No-where near as bad as the Longan. I like them, definately worth growing if you like grapes and can't grow the European types.
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John Mc
 
9th April 2011 12:12pm
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kert says...
Do you have a cross pollinator?
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sydney
9th April 2011 3:58pm
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John Mc says...
Not this year.
The others are not producing flowers as
yet.
Here's a pic of the growth of the bronze in it's first year, it has put on a nice amount of growth but there wasn't any and I didn't expect any flowers. I have a reasonable amount of pruning to do on this vine.
The other pic is a couple of Adonis grapes, I only have half a doz left on the vine.

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John Mc
 
9th April 2011 5:08pm
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kert says...
Adonis looks big . Do you have to peel the skin off?. You did the right thing by not pruning the bronze in its first year. I did a test and found that if you reduce it to a main stem and 2 arms it grows more slowly than if you let it do its own thing.
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sydney
10th April 2011 9:07am
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John Mc says...
It's hard to tell the size so I took another pic with a 5c coin for reference.
No I didn't peel the skin off, but it is tougher than vinifera, reasonably chewy.
I have some airlayering wraps around the branching that will be pruned to get a few more plants, so easy to propagate. I'll be pruning the bronze back to the formal main stem and two or maybe four laterals this year and maybe leaving a dozen or so trimmed spurs on each lateral. The bronze seems to be the most vigorous vine so far, by far.
I think I've hit the jackpot with my climate, the Muscadines are thriving in it, if I haven't already mentioned it before..
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John Mc
 
10th April 2011 12:15pm
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Nina says...
Well, as can be imagined, I lost the crop of grapes and most of the leaves fell off but now my vine is starting to recover - new growth etc. Is there a likely chance that it will reoccur next year - do I need to kill/ remove any infected leaves/soil etc?
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Nina
Warwick QLD
10th April 2011 3:58pm
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kert says...
One can improve the size of one's photographed fruit by using a child's hand. Just a tip.
My original muscadine ,described by Daley's as small and seedy is ,in fact,small and seedy. The taste is OK but far short of a proper vinifera.The taste of selected muscadines seem to be adjudged by some as equal to vinifera . What is the verdict?
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sydney
10th April 2011 4:06pm
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John Mc says...
No, definately not equal to Vinifera. Vinifera are still superior in juice and bunch sizes. I think the Muscadines, although sweet and nice flavour, would taste better if there was more juice.
My experience is limited to one cv of course. Maybe my other two might produce next season and we might be in a better position to judge then.
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John Mc
 
10th April 2011 6:49pm
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Original Post was last edited: 10th April 2011 6:51pm
au0rey says...
To Janine, I am also in Melbourne too and my Carolina Black Rose is doing well except it does have downy mildew and vine moth caterpillar attacks. I use Mancozeb fungicide with wetting agent to spray the leaves a few times. So far so good. I think the crazy weather is causing them to have all sorts of problems.

If anyone of you are interested to see how downy mildew looks like, I can snap a picture. Let me know.
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au0rey
melbourne
10th April 2011 8:03pm
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Ady says...
Hard season for vines in Victoria this year to wet & to humid . Rain has a big effect on the grapes sugars + cause the fruit to split which promotes botritis. To help with mildews plant a rose near your vine , when the rose gets mildew its time to spray your vine . Roses are more susceptible to mildews
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Ady
Hoddles Creek , Vic
13th April 2011 8:07pm
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Mary says...
http://www.winepros.org/wine101/viniculture.htm

I just bought a Thompson Seedless vine (approximately 5' tall) from Lowes last week...all the leaves and tendrils are falling off. I had it in a sunny spot...maybe too sunny, considering it was under a canopy/enclosed gardening dept. when I picked it out, but the temp here has been in the upper 80's until last Friday (103)...which is why I think the vine is not doing well now; too much direct sunlight? Some of the leaves DID look like they got burnt. Anyway, I pulled the poor little guy back under the patio where it still gets sunlight-just diffused for the hottest time of day. Today (monday) the temp was in the 60's...I think the poor plant is in "shock" from being moved to the different environment/conditions. Anyway, I am doing research...this site seems to offer some useful info...hope it helps Nina.
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Mary7
Las Vegas, NV
10th May 2011 4:51pm
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Mary says...
oh...I also forgot to mention...my vine has a funky black blotchiness to it. I did not see it until I noticed the leaves drooping and falling off. I am not too sure this is normal, but I will keep an eye on it a couple more days--and keep it away from my other plants. I just might end up taking it back for a refund.
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Mary7
Las Vegas, NV
10th May 2011 5:01pm
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kert says...
It is "black spot" aka anthracnose . The fungus is Elsinoe ampellina. Bad news . will respnd to Ziram or Mancozeb.
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sydney
11th May 2011 8:42am
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JohnfromPerth says...
Hi everyone!

I have two 30 year old grape vines and have had problems with powdery mildew, to the point it was ruining bunches of grapes. So this year I decided to spray my vines with Yates Lime Sulfer.

I sprayed once at bud burst, and then again when the grape bunches were first forming, concentration was exactly as recommended by Yates and I sprayed on normal, not too hot days.

Now a few weeks later, all the fruit are ruined and burnt, and some of the leaves have yellow/green blotches I've never seen before.

What has happened? Is this a result of the suffer sprays or something else? Help!
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JohnfromPerth
Mt Lawley, Perth
18th November 2015 8:11pm
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Trud says...
hello all, have been following the grapevine discussion and need some help.. My vine is in a raised bed,is running from north to south (loosely speaking), it is watered with tank water,is two years old. This is the first time it has had fruit and is covered with grapes- or at least was... This is the first time I have ever had to do anything specific to vines since moving here three years ago.The grapes are shrivelling up and going brown and the bottom of bunches are shrivelled and brown. The ground is moist but not saturated and I notice that the new leaves are light around the veins while the other leaves are dark and shiny. The bunches are starting to look like picture 1 in John from Perth's photos above. I am just learning how to grow fruit trees generally.. thanks Trudy
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Trud
Yamanto, QLD (near Ipswich)
26th November 2015 9:03am
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denisde says...
Botrytis has my vote
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denisde
melbourne
26th November 2015 3:03pm
#UserID: 12433
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Trud says...
thank you, can I treat this? If so how?
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Trud
Yamanto, QLD (near Ipswich)
27th November 2015 5:16pm
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Butch says...
Hi!
I'm having a problem with a few of my grapevines every year. On one end of the row the vines are a nice rich green and on the other end the leaves of some vines become more and more yellow as the summer goes on. People have been telling me they might be low in iron. Now I got this liquid to try. I have a picture attached of the label on the container. My question is, if I tried to apply it, at what rate should I mix it? I assume it is for spraying on the foliage.

Thanks ever so much.

I am from Manitoba, Canada.
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Butch
secondfrets
13th June 2018 11:44pm
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RSwanson says...
Nina... Mine looked like yours when I got triple digit degree here in Texas. They were in dark gray plastic pots that got very hot and burned the roots that were near the plastic. Putting it in a bigger pot solved my problem for now. Since your plants are in the ground, that can mean anything. Most likely to much rain water for your soil or too much fertilizer imbalances or diseases. All plants need good drainage. If you have clay soil, always add 1/3 to 1/2 parts of sand to it. Use a 10-10-10 fertilizer for grapes, and make sure the ph of the soil is about a 6, but no higher than 6.5 and no lower than 5.5. The sweet spot is 6 ph. I use litmus paper to test my water and soil. I use sulfur (slow acting and safe, but last a long time) and aluminum sulfate (fast and dangerous, but short lived) to lower my PH soil. Hope this was helpful. I know this post of mine is very late. If I had to guess in your case, I would suspect either too much rain water, or not good drainage or both. Those pics you shared are symptoms of root rot that can be from over watering, fertilizing, or other root diseases. Since it is in the ground there is really nothing you can do, unless they were in pots.
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RSwanson
North Texas
15th August 2018 9:31am
#UserID: 18831
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Original Post was last edited: 15th August 2018 9:40am

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