Testimonials Shop News Specials Catalogue Contact Forum Blog My Account My Edibles
Rare Fruit magazines
Rare Fruit magazinesPassionfruit Buy2, get 1 freeKyogle Shop Opening hourslooking for staff
Forum Rules | Updates

<< Back to Daleys Fruit Tree Forum

Mangoes in Melbourne: Mission Impossible?

    26 responses

Sort:
Jon starts with ...
Just wondering how hard it is to grow mangoes in Melbourne?

I've been looking at the Nam Doc Mai, Glenn and Bowen varieties.

I have a pretty sheltered position between a few other trees and hopefully that would protect it from wind and help it to retain warmth.

So is it impossible to get one that will fruit, or just very hard?

Jon
About the Author

 
23rd February 2009 6:42pm
#UserID: 0
Posts:
View All 's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Wayne says...
Jon, I would suggest you contact http://www.dpi.vic.gov.au/dpi/vro/vrosite.nsf/pages/vrohome as I feel they would be best qualified to help you.

Failing that, most mangoes do not like cold weather in extended periods, so give it a go if you wish
About the Author
Wayne
Mackay
23rd February 2009 7:30pm
#UserID: 338
Posts: 908
View All Wayne's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Jason says...
If you are in inner Melbourne and plant it near a North wall I wouldn't bet against you. Melbourne is MUCH warmer overnight than almost anywhere else in the state now and that's what Mangos need. If I lived in the city I'd be disspointed in myself if I couldnt' grow one :), not possible out in the country however
About the Author
Jason
 
24th February 2009 5:09am
#UserID: 637
Posts: 1217
View All Jason's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Jon says...
How about Camberwell?
About the Author
Jon
Melbourne
24th February 2009 2:51pm
#UserID: 1780
Posts: 70
View All Jon's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Jon says...
Also Wayne, I will email the DPI soon. Thanks everyone for helping.
About the Author
Jon
Melbourne
24th February 2009 2:53pm
#UserID: 1780
Posts: 70
View All Jon's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Wayne says...
I hope you have success Jon, I tried searching for Mangoes for a cool climate but found nothing, however, I found this link and as our Mangoes originated in India this variety could be super special. So ask the DPI about them.
Cheers and good luck
http://www.alphonsomangoes.com/
About the Author
Wayne
Mackay
24th February 2009 3:28pm
#UserID: 338
Posts: 908
View All Wayne's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Wayne says...
My goodness me, I just opened that link and read it properly. We can get the Alphonso mango here, in fact I have a seedling in the back yard that I have just grafted some R2E2 scions on to. It is called Mangifera Indica here and I bought it from Bunnings -- how about that for a coincidence.
About the Author
Wayne
Mackay
24th February 2009 3:39pm
#UserID: 338
Posts: 908
View All Wayne's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Jon says...
So will that species grow in Melbourne, or only Qld and Mackay? Has anyone tasted the Nam Doc Mai?

Jon
About the Author
Jon
Melbourne
28th February 2009 10:26am
#UserID: 1780
Posts: 70
View All Jon's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Wayne says...
Ask the DPI jon
About the Author
Wayne
Mackay
28th February 2009 3:08pm
#UserID: 338
Posts: 908
View All Wayne's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Jantina says...
Hi Wayne, now that the cyclone has passed I have a question for you, are you saying that you can lay your hands on the specific Alphonso variety up in Mackay?
About the Author

Mt. Gambier
18th March 2009 10:50am
#UserID: 0
Posts:
View All 's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Wayne says...
Hi Jantina

I don't know about the cyclone season being finished, the rain has returned today and one could form out to sea by the weekend.

The Alphonso mango is marketed here as Mangifera Indica and I got mine from Bunnings. Do you have a Bunnings store? Daleys sell them as well but the freight might be a bit expensive. Where would your plant stock come from over there?
About the Author
Wayne
Mackay
18th March 2009 2:53pm
#UserID: 338
Posts: 908
View All Wayne's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Jantina says...
We do have a Bunnings store these days Wayne but I would rather get one from Daleys as the quality is so good, unfortunately they have it listed under seeking propagation material.I will just have to wait. Thanks for that info. I sincerely hope you do not get another cyclone!
About the Author
Jantina
Mt. Gambier S.A.
18th March 2009 5:31pm
#UserID: 1351
Posts: 1272
View All Jantina's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Dekka says...
Wayne, Is your post suggesting that the name Mangifera indica is the 'Alphonso' variety only? Or are you saying that Bunnings sells Alphonso but labels it merely as Mangifera indica?
About the Author
Dekka
Newcastle
19th March 2009 6:57pm
#UserID: 102
Posts: 219
View All Dekka's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Wayne says...
http://www.alphonsomangoes.com/

Read this link Dekka, I bought a "Mangifera Indica" mango from Bunnings and according to this link they are one and the same as I read it.
About the Author
Wayne
Mackay
20th March 2009 1:37pm
#UserID: 338
Posts: 908
View All Wayne's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Dekka says...
Wayne, I meant that "Mangifera indica" refers to just about all commercially grown mangoes, so unless the Bunnings label specifically says 'Alfonso' then then you've misinterpretted the info in your link and you've probably bought a Bowen(K.P).
Try this link if you're interested in Mangoes.

http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/Morton/Mango_arS.html
About the Author
Dekka
Newcastle
20th March 2009 6:52pm
#UserID: 102
Posts: 219
View All Dekka's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Jon says...
Ahah, that's why I was a bit confused about the Alphonso variety.
About the Author
Jon
Melbourne
21st March 2009 10:15am
#UserID: 1780
Posts: 70
View All Jon's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Wayne says...
Well that is confusing Dekka, I am a Bowen-ite and have never heard what you say before.
About the Author
Wayne
Mackay
21st March 2009 2:25pm
#UserID: 338
Posts: 908
View All Wayne's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Firefly says...
Wayne, what are you confused by? All mangoes are in the same genus and species, and just have a different cultivar name, like any other fruit.

Apples, for instance, are all Malus domestica. Granny Smith, Red Delicious etc are all cultivars thereof.

About the Author

Penrith
21st March 2009 4:25pm
#UserID: 0
Posts:
View All 's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Wayne says...
I just didn't realise that the hundreds of different varieties of mangoes were all known as Mangifera indica
About the Author
Wayne
Mackay
21st March 2009 7:47pm
#UserID: 338
Posts: 908
View All Wayne's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Krasch says...
I'm growing a mango and it's fine.
It's on a north facing brick wall in a large mound.
To me the trick is to mimic it's native conditions - so ensure the soil well drains in winter and water plentifully in summer. Also protect well from frosts.
I'm now growing a bundle from seed - just need to find nam doc Mai mangoes...
About the Author
Krasch
Eltham
18th January 2014 7:31pm
#UserID: 9339
Posts: 2
View All Krasch's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
J says...
I grew a kensignton pride for two years in the ground in the dandenong ranges. It survived the winters but any new growth from the summer would die off in winter, so effectively it remained the same size all the time. Removed it and put a cumquat in its spot.

I'm having a go with a nam doc mango in a pot, i'll be moving it under cover come late autumn and move it out in the open in late spring. Based on what I've read, mango trees in pots do better in melbourne and even fruit.
About the Author
J
upwey, victoria
18th January 2014 10:54pm
#UserID: 2954
Posts: 397
View All J's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Krasch says...
Afternoon J,

Where did you get your Nam Doc?
I am having a hell of a time trying to source one of these - seed or tree, I don't care!

Cheers

Andrew
About the Author
Krasch
Eltham
20th January 2014 3:25pm
#UserID: 9339
Posts: 2
View All Krasch's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Markmelb says...
Krasch - you should find plenty of Nam Doc Fruit in Springvale shops - get one quite ripe not the green for salad - I got a Nam Doc Mai grafted plant from Daleys just before Xmas - Included some pics of
No5 Nam Doc Mai
No4 Nam Doc Mai setting fruit
No3 Palmer Mango in raised bed flushing growth
No2 Black Spots on KP fruit (is it sunburn from last week or anthracnose - I sprayed fungicide 2 weeks ago)
No1 KP fruit on potted specimen
Can anyone help with black spots on KPs in picture 2
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1

Picture: 2

Picture: 3

Picture: 4

Picture: 5
 
About the Author
Markmelb
,
20th January 2014 7:03pm
#UserID: 7785
Posts: 861
View All Markmelb's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Original Post was last edited: 20th January 2014 7:03pm
Chantzis says...
I have a potted mango that I grew from a Kensigton Pride pip about 5 or 6 years ago. It was outside for about 4 years initially - how it survived winters, a small pot, and neglect from others failing to water it when I was away, I'll never know. Growth for the first few years was very slow, and it clearly suffered from cold temperatures. As it became more established, its growth appeared to accelerate. Twice it was re-potted and regularly mulched and composted. I moved it indoors to my parent's house when I was forced to leave my rental property last winter, and the warmer temperature over the cold months made a big difference. With good existing growth, frequent misting of the foliage (emulating a humid environment) and a northerly aspect in the living room, the tree seemed to grow exponentially. It flowered a couple of months later, forming hundreds of baby mangoes. They began to drop, until I feared it would lose them all, until it finally kept two. The tree was moved outside to a sunny protected position a couple of months later once overnight temperatures got up to a good temp (late December it must have been). They remained on the tree for abirger month or two (fruit were approximately 4 months on the tree) until I realised that despite still being green on the outside, they were in fact quite ripe. They were delicious! Deep golden yellow flesh, and a flavour very reminiscent of Kensington Pride fruit.
My uncle has an established Kensington Pride tree planted in front of a sheltered, northerly wall in Coburg. It must be ten years old or more - he gets dozens of amazing, huge fruit every year. I'm planning to plant my tree in the ground soon, although fear my position isn't as ideal as I'd like. I did find the tree to be a beautiful indoor plant (although it took up a lot of space in the end!) and now have two more year-old plants and several just sprouted pips coming up - I'm enjoying giving them away and giving people the same melbourne mango passion that has gripped me! Pictured: the tree a few days ago, in the spot it will be likely planted shortly. Note the huge banana tree back left!
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1
  
About the Author
Chantzis
Coburg
25th February 2017 12:39am
#UserID: 15628
Posts: 2
View All Chantzis's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Markmelb says...
My first Grafted KP fruit fell into hand today - was starting to colour and felt a bit softer than the other 7 large ones hanging still - Its so cool getting a late crop when Mexican Artulfo are coming in to supply die hard Mango Lovers.
Note my first has a Nose - LOL

Chantzis -- can you put up some pics of your Uncles KP?
Edit - if you plant next to a large concrete driveway you will gain heat at night from it - ive seen a Mango down the road from me fruiting ok like this.
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1

Picture: 2
 
About the Author
Markmelb
MOUNT WAVERLEY,3149,VIC
26th April 2017 9:19am
#UserID: 7785
Posts: 861
View All Markmelb's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Original Post was last edited: 27th April 2017 11:21am
Chantzis says...
Hi Markmelb - here are two shots of my uncle's tree, taken about 10 days ago. Closeups showing fruit - notice the strange one near the centre of frame, siamese twins. The fruit are on average larger than KPs that you find in store over summer in Melbourne.

The tree was bought as a KP and the fruit certainly have a similar flavour (although sweeter and fresher as you would expect of any home grown produce). The bed the tree is planted in is by a north-facing brick wall but also has some concrete and bluestone paving around it. There is a lot of thermal mass to hold heat. I'll get a photo showing the whole tree and its microclimate next time I'm there. The colour on the ripe fruit varies - some fruit are very ripe while still completely green on the outside, others take on a beautiful pink blush (often resembling badly sunburned human sun!) while still not being completely ripe.

My guess is that commercially transported mangoes are picked before they ripen, this may partially explain the difference in colour from tree-ripened fruit. I haven't been to NT or QLD and seen ripe fruit on the tree before.


Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1

Picture: 2
 
About the Author
Chantzis
Coburg
28th April 2017 9:45pm
#UserID: 15628
Posts: 2
View All Chantzis's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Markmelb says...
Chantzis - your Uncles has great colour already - tree ripened is definitely the best - some Artulfos from Mexico now in shops are blander compared to those locally grown up North called TP3 or something like that or dragons tooth because they are picked early for shipping here. Theres a Longan and a mango i also have seen growing thru a hole in concrete fruiting ok - so the thermal mass works for them.
About the Author
Markmelb
MOUNT WAVERLEY,3149,VIC
29th April 2017 11:37am
#UserID: 7785
Posts: 861
View All Markmelb's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)

REPLY to this forum

Email: Password:
display Name: Suburb:  
Pictures: Add Another Picture
Body:
 
Remember to include a picture if possible

<< Back to Daleys Fruit Tree Forum