Testimonials Shop News Specials Catalogue Contact Forum Blog My Account My Edibles
25 percent off when you pre order
25 percent off when you pre orderIn Stock Grafted Avocado Fruit Trees are now readyCitrus BannerPitaya Dragon fruit in all different colours available at Daleys Fruit Tree Nursery
Forum Rules | Updates
<< Back to Daleys Fruit Tree Forum

What is potash and tell me why I want to buy it?

    20 responses

Elf starts with ...
Potash. I keep reading about it here and am very interested.

What is it
Why do I want it
What will it do for my plants
Why is it so expensive

I really do plan on buying some, but I need more info. I was going to ask where do I get it, but I found it in Big W in my travels there. I could buy 50 litres of cow manure and a mars bars for the same price, so it must be good.

Thanks for your help
About the Author
Elf
Albury
7th November 2009 6:54pm
#UserID: 2913
Posts: 11
View All Elf's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Zarra Ridge says...
Hi Elf,

Potash in essence is a source of potassium (element K).
Potassiums main attribute to to increase overall plant health. It assists in protecting plants from stress and disease. It is associated with water use and conservation, and moves nutrients and sugars through the plant.

It will assist your plants accessing nutrient in your soil to do it more efficiently. Very important for heavy feeders such as citrus and corn.

Its expensive because there are different forms of Potash. They range in the % of potash contained.
The 3 main types are Muriate of Potash, Sulfate of Potash and Wood Ash. Wood ash is easily accessible by anyone with a wood stove/oven or burn pit. It contains approx 35%. Burning any organic source however with fibre will contain ample potash for any fertilizer.
Sulphate of Potash is a 45-50% potash fertilizer readily distributed. Its the expensive one but less harmful to plant roots and soil bacteria than muriate.
Muriate of potash is potassium chloride prob the highest source of potash but harmful to beneficial bacteria.

If you have room to compost getting the right carbon mix in your heap/turner and adding woodash is fine. Applying K in your humus is far better than in liquid or soluble form and is far cheaper.

A healthy balance of nutrient is essential and Potassium is no exception.

Hope the above helps :)
About the Author
Zarra Ridge
Whian Whian
8th November 2009 10:43am
#UserID: 2342
Posts: 3
View All Zarra Ridge's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(1) LIKE this Question (0)
People who Like this Answer: Ish
Elf says...
Thank you very much, I appreciate the indepth answer, it certainly has helped educate me :)

Thanks again :)
About the Author
Elf
Albury
8th November 2009 2:16pm
#UserID: 2913
Posts: 11
View All Elf's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Julie says...
I use wood ashes sometimes, but my soil tends to be a bit acid. For anyone living with alkaline soil, I would be wary, as it can raise the pH.

About the Author

Roleystone WA
8th November 2009 5:50pm
#UserID: 0
Posts:
View All 's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | Edit | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(1) LIKE this Question (0)
People who Like this Answer: Ish
MR says...
Hi, Elf,
Seems you need it to actually get Fruit !! A friend of ours in another area planted passionfruit the same time as we did last October (08). He got loads of fruit, we got one. "Potassium - it's a lack of patassium" he said. Sulphate of Potash seems expensive, but you don't use much, about 10gr/sq mtr., perhaps repeat a couple of times. You can also dissolve 10g to watering can, and foliar spray leaves and fruit, that gives a quicker response. We have treated our fruit trees, vegies, with it as a priority, but are waiting the results of a mineral analysis test on untreated soil from our block.
And, we are waiting to see how our passionfruit respond after this!
Seasol is a source, and foliar spraying supposed to be good for plant health. (Little N or P in Seasol)
Seems this vegie / fruit gardening is all a learning process, eh?
About the Author
MR
 
8th November 2009 6:30pm
#UserID: 1969
Posts: 11
View All MR's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(1) LIKE this Question (0)
People who Like this Answer: Ish
Roger Abrey says...
hi l would like to know if using muilt-fuel ash would be ok to use same as wooodash

ROGER ABREY
About the Author
Roger Abrey
ROCHESTER,KENT
19th March 2012 4:41am
#UserID: 6729
Posts: 1
View All Roger Abrey's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
jakfruit etiquette says...
Exactly what are you burning as fuel ??
About the Author

 
19th March 2012 7:17am
#UserID: 0
Posts:
View All 's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | Edit | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
amanda says...
Be careful of wood ash if u have soil you don't want your soil to become more alkaline.... as it can be very alkaline...

Can put it through your compost heap first in this case though...
About the Author
amanda19
Geraldton. 400km north of Perth
19th March 2012 7:42pm
#UserID: 2309
Posts: 4607
View All amanda19's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Original Post was last edited: 19th March 2012 7:42pm
bob says...
hi
About the Author
bob22
 
6th September 2012 12:57pm
#UserID: 7227
Posts: 2
View All bob22's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Original Post was last edited: 6th September 2012 1:04pm
steve says...
bob i agree
About the Author
steve29
steve
6th September 2012 1:00pm
#UserID: 7228
Posts: 2
View All steve29's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
bob. says...
thank you steve
About the Author
bob22
bob
6th September 2012 1:03pm
#UserID: 7227
Posts: 2
View All bob22's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
steve. says...
thank you bob
About the Author
steve29
steve
6th September 2012 1:06pm
#UserID: 7228
Posts: 2
View All steve29's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Jeff says...
So Potassium does not directly promote flowering, I read in an artical that overal condition of a plant contributes to flowering, I am an orchid grower, what a letdown.
About the Author
Jeff6
Berkeley Vale, Australia
21st September 2012 3:13pm
#UserID: 7260
Posts: 1
View All Jeff6's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Brendan says...
Check out this liquid potash Jeff. I'd say it does help to promote flowering & fruiting etc.
They also have a orchid bloomer, NPK of 9-6-27.

http://www.searles.com.au/fertilisers.html

http://www.searles.com.au/pdf/Liquid%20Potash%201%20Litre%20label.pdf

About the Author
Brendan
Mackay, Q
22nd September 2012 8:42am
#UserID: 1947
Posts: 1722
View All Brendan's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Original Post was last edited: 22nd September 2012 8:47am
irshad gardezi says...
I have a mango and kinnow farm .I will start picking kinnow after 75days. can failar spray of Potassium help me to increase size and colour.
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1

Picture: 2
 
About the Author
irshad gardezi
multan Pakistan
1st November 2012 3:59am
#UserID: 7381
Posts: 1
View All irshad gardezi's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Brendan says...
Yes irshad, it will help. Maybe won't help your present crop (as it looks mature), but will help next year.
Check out this link: http://www.searles.com.au/pdf/Liquid%20Potash%201%20Litre%20label.pdf
About the Author
Brendan
Mackay, Q
3rd November 2012 7:42am
#UserID: 1947
Posts: 1722
View All Brendan's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
JP says...
Does the charcoal contain the potassium or is it in the (white) ash that one would take out of the fire place. I also have a bi-product of commercially made charcoal beads and have yet to try it. In one garden area where I have spread the ash, the plants look great, but in another area, they are doing ok but not great. All the gardens have been done only in the last 12 months
About the Author
JP1
Oakey Qld
5th November 2012 8:48pm
#UserID: 7395
Posts: 1
View All JP1's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Julie says...
Surprised no-one has answered this. I'm pretty sure it's the ash that contains the potash. The charcoal would be almost pure carbon. Anyone disagree?

The plants that are not looking so great - maybe the ash has made it too alkaline for them? Different plants have different needs, and most veggies like it slightly acid.

I have used the ash successfully to amend acid soil. Worth doing a pH test.
About the Author
Julie
Roleystone WA
9th November 2012 9:00pm
#UserID: 154
Posts: 1841
View All Julie's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Mike says...
charcoal should be mostly carbon and the ash calcium carbonate,less than a tenth potash,less than a hundredth phosphate and a mix of trace elements.
About the Author

 
9th November 2012 9:55pm
#UserID: 5418
Posts: 1438
View All 's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Mage says...
Would it be good for hydrangea ??
About the Author
Mage
Pasadena
23rd May 2016 12:33pm
#UserID: 13965
Posts: 1
View All Mage's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Julie says...
Yes, if you want pink hydrangeas. To get blue flowers the soil needs to be acid.

Edit: Mage, I was referring to using wood ash as a source of potash.
About the Author
Julie
Roleystone WA
23rd May 2016 7:26pm
#UserID: 154
Posts: 1841
View All Julie's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Original Post was last edited: 25th May 2016 10:16am

REPLY to this forum

Login or Create Account

<< Back to Daleys Fruit Tree Forum