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Mulberry from cuttings

    46 responses

Jan Szmidt starts with ...
I have a white mulberry tree that copped an absolute hiding during a storm prior to Christmas. Most limbs were split or broken down to approx 40cm above the ground. Are mulberry trees usually brittle like this or was it the strength of the storm that may have done this. I am thinking of removing the tree if it is prone to being brittle. The tree is still growing quite well even on the split and broken limbs. Half the tree is more like a ground cover now with its branches growing on the ground. New branches have grown from these and have grown in a vertical position straight up. Now my main question is :- will I be able to take cuttings from it and have them grow. If so, what is the method. Thanks in advance.
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Bundamba Ipswich Qld.
31st March 2009 9:15am
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Jan says...
Sorry everyone. I forgot that I had already posted this.
Cheers.
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Bundamba Ipswich Qld.
31st March 2009 10:19am
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BJ says...
I'd really appreciate some (urgent) advice in relation to Black English Mulberry Cuttings. There is an old tree in my suburb, but the block has been marked for development so I figured I'd try and take some cuttings in order to preserve the tree. I've collected about a dozen twigs with the buds just bursting. What sort of soil do I try to plant them in? Are there any special techniques for mulberries? Should I use hard-wood hormone or is generic rooting hormone OK? Should I try to just propogate leaves, or are large sticks OK? Do I need to chill them in the fridge first? ... so many questions. I'd love advice!
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BJ11
WA
11th October 2010 7:08pm
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John Mc says...
Hey BJ,
They are one of the easiest plants to propagate. Just get some twigs around pencil thickness, about 300mm long and shove them in the ground. Better make it snappy. They're starting to use their energy store. I did about 12 cuttings myself and about 10 are growing nicely. see pic.
If the tree is going to be cut down you could grab some large truncheons, ie, branches 1 to 2 meters long and 50 to 100mm thick. Plant them deeply and wait. You've got nothing to loose. I've never tried large one's before but I'd be giving it a go. If they take, you will have an instant mulberry tree ready to fruit it's head off next year.

And Jan, white mulberries don't strike that well. If I was you, I'd be resurecting the tree you have. Yes they do have soft wood, but you must of had one hell of a storm.
Pictures - Click to enlarge

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John Mc
 
11th October 2010 8:05pm
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Original Post was last edited: 11th October 2010 8:10pm
Brad says...
my new block has a well established weeping black mulberry. is this the same quality / taste fruit as the non weeping?
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Brad2
nearly Perth Hills
11th October 2010 8:32pm
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BJ says...
Thanks John Mc - I've stuck 17 potential twigs in the ground less than 3 hours off the tree (and in water during that entire time). Here is hoping nature is good to them (if so - I'll be advertising free mulberry trees). I might try and take some cuttings from the other mulberry in the same area tomorrow (I think it is a black shahtoot or beenleigh ... it is already in full fruit). I'd love to have my own mulberries (but they are messy and I can't think of a good space yet - beyond the naturestrip!)
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BJ11
WA
11th October 2010 9:04pm
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BJ says...
OK, If anyone wants mulberry tree cuttings, or even to attempt to transplant a fully grown mulberry tree there is a delicious tree on the corner of malvern road and hawksburn road in Belmont (WA - about 5km from Perth CBD). The land is being cleared for some high-rise apartments and the tree has about a week left to live.
Brad - this mulberry has a weeping habit and is very tasty if you want to try and strike a branch (it is laden with fruit right now if you want to sample).
I've taken another half-dozen cuttings in the hope something will strike. This tree has survived the 100 days without water of last summer with no care so clearly its genes are good.
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BJ11
WA
12th October 2010 2:40pm
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VLR says...
I grew half a dozen cuttings from my mulberry tree last summer when we cut half of it off to extend a fence. I used a root strike powder for medium wood and they all took. I forgot to water them several times after the first leaves appeared but they still lived (I don't water the parent tree at all and it produces heaps of huge berries). They're very tough, I don't imagine you'd have any problems at all.
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VLR
Perth
12th October 2010 4:00pm
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tecko says...
Hi BJ, VLR
Any of you interested in swapping your mulberry tree cuttings with my grape vine cuttings (Red Globe, and Flame Seedless)? Ta.
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tecko1
 
12th October 2010 4:59pm
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BJ says...
Hi tecko,
if you're in Perth why not try some cuttings yourself? The tree is marked for destruction, so what is there to loose? The tree isn't far from the city - and you are probably more skilled at cuttings than I am (I've only ever tried rosemary and lavendar before). You'd be more than welcome to any success I have ... but you might have better success yourself or perhaps take a larger branch!
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BJ11
WA
12th October 2010 5:14pm
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tecko says...
Thanks BJ. I might just take a drive down there this weekend and see the tree for myself, and see what I can do.
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tecko1
 
13th October 2010 1:57am
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Pieta says...
No absolutely not! I got sold the ordinary mulberry as a black English mulberry and was really frustrated. They are not nearly as juicy or sweet.
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Perth
14th October 2010 11:11am
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brad says...
removalists have just left and my 8 year old nephew just said "I can't get enough of the mulberries". I haven't seen his friend long enough to wonder...

move details probably belong in another thread but:
broadband already works (!!!) and it looks like the potted trees made it quite well so far. 2 concrete pots are worse for wear. The truck driver reckoned it was the heaviest he'd ever felt this truck :)
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Brad2
G Hill, Perth
15th October 2010 7:27pm
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allybanana says...
allybanana says...
Pieta is it possible to top work your mulberry wit english black as the ordinary mulberry, Morus alba is what is commonly used as rootstock for english black and the shahoots. If your not confident with the grafting I am sure there is someone around who could help, Perth appears to have a healthy contingent of fruit tree geeks.

At the moment I am growing my common mulberry to a reasonably size so I can the graft dwarf red shahoot on to the branches saves waiting for a slow tree to get to size. And hoping by grafting slow growing wood on top it will then grow slowly once I graft.

well done on the moove brad
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Eden S-East NSW
16th October 2010 12:00am
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People who Like this Answer: Jan
BJ says...
Hi,
It has been about a month since I put in my mulberry cuttings and only two have green leaves. Does this mean that the rest are dead (and should be disposed of) or could they still be dormant.
Clearly I'm not too good at this cutting thing!
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BJ11
WA
10th November 2010 6:30pm
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Jason says...
The ones that have leaves probably haven't made roots yet but once they do have leaves it doesn't take long. As for the others, leave them a bit longer at least until they are properly dead before you give up
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Jason
Portland
10th November 2010 8:07pm
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tecko says...
Thanks for your words of encouragement Jason. I took 4 cuttings, and all the leaves have fallen out. As suggested by you, I am going to leave my stalks in the water for a little while longer, and hopefully, one might "revive".
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tecko1
perth, w.a.
11th November 2010 1:21pm
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allybanana says...
Forgive me BJ and others for being a typical virgo but somethings do not appear in order in this thred. I am having difficulty following the species in this thread can I have some help please.

Jan’s original post the white mulberry split. Was this a white shatoot (very long white mulberry Morus macroura), or white mulberry Morus alba, which is easy to strike from cuttings http://www.crfg.org/pubs/ff/mulberry.html . John Mc those cuttings look like morus alba white mullberry to me.

Unfortunately going to the references is also confusing as Glowinski on Page 257 states "Morus alba is the white mulberry of the Far East, famous for its foliage, once used to feed silk worms. Its fruit is large, white, very sweet but insipid"

In contrast Californian rare fruit growers state “The color of the fruit does not identify the mulberry species. White mulberries, for example, can produce white, lavender or black fruit. White mulberry fruits are generally very sweet but often lacking in needed tartness.” See website http://www.crfg.org/pubs/ff/mulberry.html . They also mention,” The white mulberry is so-named for the color of its buds, rather than the color of its fruit".

Wikipedia has pictures of Morus alba and states
"The fruit is 1–2.5 cm long; in the species in the wild it is deep purple, but in many cultivated plants it varies from white to pink; it is sweet but bland, unlike the more intense flavor of the red mulberry and black mulberry.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morus_alba

In another wiki article the shatoot Morus macroura is only regarded as Morus alba variation laevigata http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mullberry. This appears to be the trend with some American articles as the crfg article cited above also makes no mention of the shatoot or Morus macroura.

At least BJ you when you say English black, it says to me Morus nigra difficult to strike, so well done if you are successful, needs colder climate, beautiful flavour, ripens around Christmas and next to no stalk on fruit. The dormant buds are large pointy and dark. Am I on the right track?

What is the possibility Glowinski has made a minor stuff up on his mulberries. An important distinction however if we are interested in both taste and propagation of this genus.

I am crap at posting pics can someone help
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Eden S-East NSW
12th November 2010 12:15am
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peter says...
hi ally,
i would say john mc cuttings are
morus nigra (black mulberry)

the white mullberry (morus alba)
should have whitish berries and be
sweet but lacking tartness

the english black is more commonly
refered to as a black english

i have it on good orthority that you
cannot strike cuttings of the
shahtoots or the black english
if someone has sucsess please let me
know.

morus nigra referes to all the types
of black mulberries.

my small morus alba (white) has
95% oak shaped leaves and 5% heart
shaped leaves

where as on of my small nigras has
5$ oak shaped leaves and 95% heart shaped leaves

my dwarf black mulberries have heart
shaped leaves like johns mcs

my black english mullberries have slight velvety leaves.

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adelaide
12th November 2010 6:57pm
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Julie says...
I agree with peter and allybanana that black English are hard to strike. My neighbour gave me about 30 cuttings from her father's tree - delicious fruit, almost like a blackberry. Not one struck, although it was the right time of year.

My fruit book says they are usually grafted onto another variety because they are so hard to propagate from cuttings, so I don't feel so bad!
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Julie
Roleystone WA
12th November 2010 9:46pm
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Original Post was last edited: 12th November 2010 9:48pm
Rhys says...
I'm with you allybanana...very confused about the different mulberry types. I've also read a few things saying it is not the colour of the fruit that determines if it is alba or nigra, but then i know Louis Glowinski has done a fair bit of research and i generally trust what he says, but everybody makes mistakes.

Peter, can i ask where you heard that Morus alba has to have whitish berries, while morus nigra encompasses all the black fruit?
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Getafix
 
12th November 2010 9:47pm
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Itdepends says...
I didn't have any problems striking a black english. Pruned mine when I bought it- dipped the end in some rooting hormone and stuck it in the garden over winter- took root and grew fine. (Subsequently dug up in summer and passed on to a fellow gardener in Collie).
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12th November 2010 10:27pm
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peter says...
rhys,
whitish as in white to pale white,
pale gray to even quite black, my siter has one which is very white.
the genus name for morus is the latin word for mulberry and the species name nigra means black. (quote from don bourke)

it depends,
how sure are you that it was a black english.
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adelaide
12th November 2010 11:11pm
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MaryT says...
Has anyone tried air layering? My friend did it on my lemon tree and got a new lemon tree from it!

From Wiki:" In air layering (or marcotting), the target region is wounded (mt: almost ring barked but not quite) and then surrounded in a moisture-retaining wrapper such as sphagnum moss, which is further surrounded in a moisture barrier such as polyethylene film (mt: cling wrap). Rooting hormone is often applied to encourage the wounded region to grow roots. When sufficient roots have grown from the wound, the stem from the parent plant is removed and planted."

It was that easy; but took a few months for the roots to grow into the moss.

You have to tie the 'parcel' well at each end but leaving some air vents. Also it helps to wrap the whole thing with foil to discourage birds from disturbing it.

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MaryT
Sydney
13th November 2010 1:47pm
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Phil@Tyalgum says...
Yes I air layered a white loquat before I had to move house last year, I left the bag in place for about three months and although the roots weren't that vigorous to begin with, I think from the healthy young plant which has developed, it's been a success. Pleased as I didn't want to leave that tree behind.
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phil@tyalgum
Murwillumbah
13th November 2010 2:01pm
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BJ says...
OK,
I've done a little investigating of my bare sticks I'm hoping will one day be mulberry trees ... a third stick has a little green bud on it ... so I presume it is alive and trying to grow! I did a tiny scratch test on a few others and they are still green too. So I'm thinking something must be working if they are not all dead yet.
Can I fertilise or anything to encourage further growth and survival?
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BJ11
WA
13th November 2010 7:43pm
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Lyn says...
I remember my father-in-law once used mulberry tree prunings as stakes for his tomatoes - the mulberry prunings grew better than the tomatoes - so I don't think they need any special treatment - they are as tough as old boots.
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Lyn2
Outer North Brisbane
14th November 2010 4:34pm
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allybanana says...
Okay a pictures of what I believe is Morus nigra, here goes, please feel free to criticise as there have been times when I have been confident I am right, when I was wrong, the sunburn on Amanda’s fruit for instance.

Morus nigra, note the slightly furry on the underside of the leaves and short stalks on the fruit, one of the varieties being English black.

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allybanana
Eden S-East NSW
14th November 2010 6:29pm
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peter says...
yes that is a morus nigra and i would
say it is the black english variety,
and as far as i know the only nigra that has fury leaves.

a morus rubra has red coloured berries

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adelaide
14th November 2010 6:37pm
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allybanana says...
Morus alba. Note the long stalk on the fruit smooth leaf underside, there are more pictures on this American site were they compare it with their native mulberry. I notice the new growth is often longer and thinner than Morus nigra
http://www.duke.edu/~cwcook/trees/moal.html
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Picture: 2
 
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allybanana
Eden S-East NSW
14th November 2010 6:40pm
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allybanana says...
Now its getting really soupy, what you said Peter, reminded me of something I had seen. So I checked the Daleys Dwarf Black Mulberry http://www.daleysfruit.com.au/fruit%20pages/Dwarf-Mulberry-Black.htm they class this as Morus nigra it supports what you are saying that there are other cultivars classed as Morus nigra that don’t look like the nigra I posted. Watch the start of the movie notice the long stalk on the fruit and the shinny leaves.

Then how do you tell the difference between a Morus nigra with shiny leaves and a stalk and a Morus alba with black berrys shiny leaves and a stalk which I still maintain exists and was the original Morus alba the white berries being only human selected cultivar.

The other thing that has happened is that there are hybrid cultivars out there and the dwarf black could be a hybrid that is given only one side of its ancestry. A long bow but i am drawing it regardless.
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allybanana
Eden S-East NSW
14th November 2010 9:39pm
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BJ says...
OK, I've another question now about my mulberry cuttings. I put most of the cuttings in the one pot about 3.5 months ago because I didn't have much in the way of spare pots - so now a few of them have grown quite a bit. When is it likely to be safe to transplant them?

If anyone is interested, from 17 'cuttings' I've managed 5 successes thus far. I put in roughly even numbers of cuttings from two trees but the successes are not even - 4 of them are what I believe were the Morus alba (shiny leaves, large dark berries ripening in November) and one which I guess is a Morus nigra (furry underside of leaves, smaller black sweeter berriers ripening after Christmas). The suspected Morus nigra didn't push out leaves until about 3 months of inactivity - which could be why the numbers aren't even as I removed what I thought were dead sticks!
Given I've only ever done cuttings of rosemary before (and killed half of them ... apparently they need water) I think my success thus far proves that these cuttings strike easily and are tough with no special care required.
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BJ11
Perth
24th January 2011 11:45pm
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allybanana says...
Well done BJ with the morus nigra somtimes it good not to know what you cant do. I have read somewere Morus nigra can be propergated by trunchons.
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allybanana
Eden SE NSW
25th January 2011 11:16am
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BJ says...
Hello again ... I'm looking for a home for some of my mulberry cuttings ... I've managed to give a few away, but I've still got a few looking for a home.
Does anyone (and I'm thinking of you TJ) want my remaining Morus alba? Obviously it is free - but it needs a new home soon as it is growing out of its pot!
I'm still trying to figure what I can do with the Morus nigra ... if I can't figure out where to put that little plant it will also (sob) be free to a good home. It is a much slower grower.
First in best dressed.
My post-code is 6103 (so probably not helpful to anyone not local!)
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BJ11
 
3rd April 2011 5:31pm
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Jantina says...
Sorry to butt in here but did you see my reply to your achacha seed offer BJ?
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Jantina
Mt Gambier
3rd April 2011 5:36pm
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BJ says...
Hi Jantina, the BJ above is the other BJ. Confusing, huh? I've sent you an email re: the achachairu seeds.
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Theposterformerlyknownas
Brisbane
3rd April 2011 6:58pm
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Jantina says...
Hmmmn, perhaps you could call yourself BJ1 and BJ2 to avoid mixups. Have replied to your email.
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Jantina
Mt Gambier
3rd April 2011 10:51pm
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Julie says...
This is a really big flaw in the website. I have never come across a forum that allowed two people with the same name. Usually, you get a message telling you that name is taken - choose another. It saves a lot of confusion.

At one point, there were three Julies! Such a small thing, but I wish it could be fixed.

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Julie
Roleystone WA
4th April 2011 8:25pm
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BJ says...
There you go, I think I have now changed my name to BMc?
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Theposterformerlyknownas
Brisbane
4th April 2011 9:41pm
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tecko says...
Hi BJ,
Have you got any still? I'd like to have one, if they are still available. All my cuttings did not strike, unfortunately, and there's probably one spot for it in my front yard.
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tecko1
perth
5th April 2011 1:53pm
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BJ says...
Tecko
You're more than welcome ... just e-mail me (belinda(dot)white(at)optusnet(dot)com(dot)au) and let me know the type that you want and send you my address so that you can pop around whenever and grab the plants (I'll just leave them by my front door).
They're tough if they can survive my neglect!
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BJ11
 
5th April 2011 9:49pm
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Rosalie says...
I have 2 mulberry trees in my back yard, I have been living here for 3 yrs now and i have not had one single crop of berries. This season one tree produced 2 berries on the only horizontal branch, the rest are all vertical. Last winter i did prune the tree in the hope of fruit, successful prune-unsuccessful crop:( The climate here in winter gets down to 9degrees on average at night. Is this cold enough? They are also in full sun. I have no idea what type of mulberry tree it is. Any ideas would be great.
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Rosalie
Brisbane-ish
30th July 2011 12:13pm
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Nugget says...
Its very easy to plant Mulberry cuttings, wait till just before Spring and take a couple of long shoots, these are the ones that grow after the crop, when you see young buds starting to form,( do not wait till they turn into leaves ) these can be as thick as your finger, cut them into length's of 30 to 35 cm, sharpen the bottom end to a pencil point, dip in cutting powder if you like, but it's not necessary, and shove them 3/4 of their length into well dug ground, keep ground moist around cutting till it is well established,you will have a few Mulberries straight away that year, 100% strike every time you use this method
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Nugget
Maryborough Qld
29th December 2011 5:27pm
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Rose says...
I have taken cuttings with the stems about as big as your thumb. I peal back the top layer of bark and put it in a bucket of water. It takes a good few months but you will soon see roots growing. When you have lots of roots plant it out into a pot then into the ground. It worked for me. Now I am trying to do it like that with other things.
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Rose8
 
15th January 2012 2:07pm
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allybanana says...
To continue the discussion on Morus nigra and alba identification. I bought a dawarf blak from Daleys listed as Morus nigra and I belive it is a black fruited Morus alba. Based on bud size, leaf shape and texture and most definately taste it's okay but dosent have that rich sour flavour.
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allybanana
EDEN, NSW
23rd January 2014 5:07pm
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Jan says...
I would say my tree is Morus Alba with Fruit approx 2.5 cm.
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Jan
Bundamba
18th October 2014 11:21am
#UserID: 10034
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Original Post was last edited: 18th October 2014 11:21am
Mulchmad says...
If anyone is interested in growing any fruit trees find your local 'Rare Fruit Assoiation ' I am a member of a club in Queensland and is the best thing I've done.
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Mulchmad
Bundaberg
27th June 2018 6:42pm
#UserID: 18632
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