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Avocado grafting

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Jason starts with ...
Anyone been doing some Avocado grafting lately. I was wondering if anyone has been getting near 100% take and what they are doing. Just interested because I have a flowering seedling too close to the house so this last year I've grown some seedlings and grafted it onto those tonight. I did a few so I should get one or two to stick. But yeah I was enjoying it after so long not grafting one. And it got me wondering. I only ever got about 70% take on avocados even on my best day and sometimes a pretty low percentage indeed but I always got enough for myself.
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Jason
Portland
7th February 2014 6:24am
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VF says...
Sorry Jason, this is not answering your question, but I have other questions too. (I'm wanting to try Avo grafting for first time.) Which seedling makes the best rootstock, with choices being Reed, Hass, Fuerte or Shephard as seed source? I'd preferably like it to be a bit dwarfing, but disease resistance is foremost. And, what type of graft do you find takes the best? Do you do anything special post-grafting? When is the best time of the year for Avo grafting?
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VF
Wongawallan
7th February 2014 7:06am
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Jason says...
Ok VF well what I do is just cut the scion just as its started growth. I only use very small rootstock, slightly less than pencil thickness. It doesn't seem to matter at all what cut I use. Even a a simple diagonal cut has worked for me or a V. I used to cut the scions then dip them in water then join them. Last night I skipped the water. Then tape them up, then I tie one of those little freezer bags over the graft.

I then leave them in the shade. Temp wise when its 20c or so seems good. Its about 30 odd here today so I might be pushing my luck or maybe they will just heal faster.. Tomorrow is going to be 40 so they will need to come inside tomorrow.

I think if you use a sharp knife and put a bag over them you should at least get a couple to take out of 10 first try.

I use any kind of seed. I think this batch are on Hass which is probably the strongest grower in the cool conditions I have.

Reed probably makes a good rootstock since the bigger seeds tend to make thicker seedlings. The last time I had an Avocado graft Jantina was here and I had just planted it at about 20cm tall. I noticed today that tree is my height now (5'10"). Its hass on hass, very strong grower that one, minimal incompatibility I guess.
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Jason
Portland
7th February 2014 12:42pm
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Original Post was last edited: 7th February 2014 12:39pm
VF says...
Thankyou Jason for your help, nice and clear. :) Google left me cross-eyed.

Hopefully my seedlings should be a good size soon to give it a go (weather cooler soon too).

Your Hass sounds like a beauty! You must have good growing conditions too.
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VF
Wongawallan
7th February 2014 7:30pm
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Paul W says...
I have had quite alot of success with avocado grafting, but I only get about 70% success rate as well. My view is that timeing is key and right now is a good time of the year. Late Jan through to mid Feb is when I have the most success. It is important that the rootstock is in a strong growth flush and that tends to happen now. I prefer a bark graft but I suspect that it doesnt really matter. Another thing that I feel is very important is to spray everything with alcohol during grafting. Most grafts seem to fail because of fungal attack, so if you spray your knife, hands scion and where you cut your rootstock, you get better results. A friiend of mine also uses a solution of rooting hormone mixed with water and adds a drop to the graft joint. This promotes callasing and supposedly improves your success rate, however I have not done much in the way of trials so cant really comment on how successful this is. The health of the rootstock is very important too. Poor, weak seedlings are far less likely to take.
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Paul W
Warragul
7th February 2014 10:30pm
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Paul W says...
This is a picture of a graft I did last week. Anne posted on here a few weeks ago about her Mexicola avocado so I asked her if she could send me some scion which she kindly did. Heres hoping a few take.
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Picture: 1
  
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Paul W
Warragul
7th February 2014 10:37pm
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Markmelb says...
Im finding as Jason points out NOW is finally a good time as Avos are flushing new growth really well - Ive been trying to graft to some hass and fuerte seeds since October without success - so wonder if those getting some success can show their new growth success -
Ive put a couple pics up of grafts ive done from 2 weeks to a month ago - as well as a triple graft that may work - heres hoping? Mainly Wurtz but a Lamb Hass and multi is Bacon Wurtz and Lamb Hass (I do have a clear cellophane gift bag over them and in SHADE area)
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Picture: 3

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Markmelb
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8th February 2014 10:46am
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Original Post was last edited: 8th February 2014 10:47am
Jason says...
Ill post some pics if my grafts take. I'll be a couple weeks until I know.

The thing is in October you have flowers, so you can't really get a good scion until the second flush (now in Victoria). Looks like you have some takers there now Mark.
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Jason
Portland
8th February 2014 12:35pm
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Jason says...
All my grafts look good still, only another week or two and they will either push growth or fall off. But looking good so far.
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Jason
Portland
15th February 2014 2:34pm
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Markmelb says...
Jason - What I was wondering most is the next step ? How to harden new growth upon removing plastic bag and when best to take off etc as a graft i thought was taking off back before xmas got set back and dried up even when in shade area - Thanks
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Markmelb
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15th February 2014 3:51pm
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Jason says...
I usually put a rip in the bag once all the leaf stems have dropped off the scion. Then once it's really pushing growth out of the scion then I'll take the bag off. I like to plant them in the ground fairly soon (during the winter). Or even before if it rains enough, but it won't.
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Jason
Portland
15th February 2014 9:12pm
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Original Post was last edited: 16th February 2014 2:54am
Markmelb says...
great thanks -- so reduce humidity - with a vent - will look at leaf stems in morning
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Markmelb
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15th February 2014 9:55pm
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Jason says...
Hey guys my grafts are all looking very good so far. I think I did eight? more or less. A few of them look like they are gearing up to push now. At the moment I still have them bagged. I noticed they have been getting (accidental) morning sun, maybe that's been a good thing. Once the sun gets up they've been shaded.
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Jason
Portland
24th February 2014 4:30pm
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Jason says...
I took the bags off today for a few hours to clean up any buds from the rootstock and generally let them air out. Will put the bags back on I think for another week just to be sure. But some of them seem to be pushing already.
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Jason
Portland
25th February 2014 4:53pm
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Brendan says...
They look good Jason, you may be able to supply Daleys soon :)
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Brendan
Mackay,Q
26th February 2014 9:15am
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Jason says...
It takes me a year to grow the seedlings, trouble grafting them and then growing them again.

I think anyone who does that and then sells the plant for an hours worth of wage including potting mix, fertiliser and water costs is MAD Lol. I only do it myself because you end up with as better tree if you can do everything yourself and get them into the ground at a size that wouldn't yet be marketable. By the time they look pretty enough to sell they are pretty much not hardy enough for me to grow anymore. I've only vary rarely had a commercially grown one survive the first Summer
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Jason
Portland
26th February 2014 3:03pm
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Original Post was last edited: 26th February 2014 3:03pm
sternus1 says...
I agree Jason, after propagation supplies and factoring one's own time and energy I've never seen the sense in selling plants considering the prices they go for. I have no idea how these sellers on ebay are turning a profit.
s
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sternus1
Australia
26th February 2014 3:04pm
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JohnMc1 says...
Here's a couple I did last year. The small one on the left is a Hazzard and the one substantially larger is Secondo. They both look a bit ragged just surviving a severe drought.
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John Mc
Warnervale NSW
28th February 2014 8:54pm
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Jason says...
Two varieties I don't have those.

I think if there's a week in early Feb next year without a major heat wave we will have to organise a big scion swap up and grafting session to spread the varieties around to everyone.

I better get some more seedlings going for next year.

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Jason
Portland
1st March 2014 2:57pm
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JohnMc1 says...
Yes I have heaps of strong seedlings but the weather didn't suit this year. Just no water, different story now, won't stop raining. Luckily I dug the dam out to four times it's capacity, so should be OK next drought.
I have a better take up rate in early spring, but I'll do some more if I can find some scionwood suitable for grafting. I have Reed, Wurtz and the above two cv's.
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John Mc
Warnervale NSW
1st March 2014 9:16pm
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Paul W says...
Its about 5 weeks since I grafted the mexicolas. At this stage it looks like I have about 60-70% success rate which I am happy with given that Anne sent the scion through the post and that they went through a heat wave shortly after grafting. I set up a mister on a timer to wet a sheet that I had pitched over them like a tent that came on every hour for a couple of minutes to try and keep them cool which seemed to help. Its still early days but looking good at this stage.
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Paul W
Warragul
10th March 2014 12:58pm
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Jason says...
Good stuff Paul, we will watch with interest how that one performs for you.

All my grafts are still living so far, not all are pushing leaves (some are) but all still look well and alive. I doubt I'll end up with 100% but shouldn't loose many at this stage
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Jason
Portland
11th March 2014 9:43am
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Jason says...
Heres some of mine as of today that I feel are ready to go without the bags or at least only have them loose
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Jason
Portland
11th March 2014 12:39pm
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Jason says...
This is turning out to be the best Avocado grafting thread I've seen in a while so I'll keep updating it.

The reason I grew those seedlings in the first place was because a seedling Avocado volunteered itself right next the the house, grew very rapidly and flowered within five years, might have even been four years. It's been two years since and it hasn't set fruit yet. I was hoping it would have by now but to be fair its still maturing. In any case it's right up hard against the house and is some 15 feet tall already for it has to go soon.

So the mission was to graft this tree in case its a type A Mexican fruit which are very scarce and would be quite useful.

There's at least one other seedling growing within a couple inches of this one (hard to tell but could be a third too) in any case the second tree is very unusual and distinctive and even faster growing. I call this one "big leaf" because its got very wide leaves, really strange one.

So in my pot pictured above I've got something like four gAvocados "flower" which is the flowering seedling. Of which three have definitely taken. One of "big leaf" which might have taken. Three of Reed, two of those have taken.

I also have one of "LC" which is the very large purplish leafed seedling I have which threw its first flower this year. I don't know if this one has taken but it's just as a backup and not so important right now.

All the grafts in this pot which pushed first were standard V grafts, nothing fancy and that's the graft shape/cut I've had most success with lately. One of the Reeds that's pushing was a diagonal / graft but it's not been quite as quick to heal.

Because they are all in one pot I have a big of work to do soon in moving them either to other pots or straight into the ground. I don't really have enough space for that many Avocados. So I'll probably just plant the two Reeds and one of "flower" and the "big leaf" if it takes. The others can go in pots. In case anyone is wondering how I'll transplant these it'll be with the patented Jason wet transplant technique. Which is tip them all out in a big bucket/bin full of water and then fish them out and replant in muddy soup ground or muddy soup potting mix in a pot. Leave drain and you're done.

I'll take more pictures soon, I'd like to unwrap the tape to show the healing now but its a bit early for that really.
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Jason
Portland
15th March 2014 10:40pm
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Brad2 says...
great thread. Grafter I know in WA gets avos to work via chip budding which breaks all the 'advice' out there. I got one to take last year- then a bird sat on it and snapped it.
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Brad2
G Hill, Perth
16th March 2014 12:10am
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Brendan says...
Did any of those large purple avocado seeds I sent you sprout Jason?
Found this the other day (pic), it's a Williams avocado, and it looks identical to my large purple variety :-)
(mine btw, is a type 'A')

Good to see you back Brad,WA :-)
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Mackay. Q
16th March 2014 11:54am
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Jason says...
Brendan yes, I have the purple ones you sent ready to plant out now:).

Brad, one guy David on the cloudforest chip buds Avocados. He has some success but grafting very young seedlings seems to give the best percentage and strongest plants in the long term. When you get a good one on a closely related stock they grow away like champion's.
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Jason
Portland
16th March 2014 1:08pm
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Original Post was last edited: 16th March 2014 1:05pm
Jason says...
Well so far I have 7 of the nine I grafted growing. The other two might push still. Lets see.
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Jason
Portland
29th March 2014 11:00pm
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Joanna24 says...
Hi, I have a few questions about grafting, firstly, do you just cut branches off another avocado tree to use to graft an avocado seedling?
and second, how old should the other tree be that you are cutting from to use for grafting your younger plant?
Hope this is understandable, thanks.
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Joanna24
Perth
26th March 2016 11:13pm
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jakfruit etiquette says...
Hi. Yes you need to get the grafting sticks from the same type of Avo fruit variety you want to grow. ie if you want to graft a Hass Avo, you need to get sticks from a Hass tree. Age of the tree you get the sticks from doesnt matter, as you are grafting from a grafted tree. That said a mature fruiting tree is probably the best source of sticks. Also you need to size match the grafting sticks to your seedling. Usually terminal shoots/branch tips are used when grafting Avocados, as this sort of replaces what is cut off the seedling.
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jakfruit etiquette
vic
31st March 2016 8:27pm
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Original Post was last edited: 31st March 2016 8:28pm
Joanna24 says...
Okay thank you!
I have an Avo tree in the family, it is very mature, would have to be over 20 years old and more possibly, however it hasn't fruited or made flowers in a very long time, any advice on how to get it to start flowering and fruiting again?
Also would this tree be fine to graft with my Avi seedling or not a good idea as it doesn't bear fruit (although it has but a long time ago) ? However I am unaware of this tree was grafted to begin with

Thankyou
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Joanna24
Perth
1st April 2016 1:54pm
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CT says...
Sir can you please let me know what time of the year is the best time for bark grafting Avocados
Is it as the other person said late January or early February
I have a mature Hass tree about 10 years old grown from a Hass seed but has not produced more than 10 avocados in the last 2 years
I have a neighbor who has a 7 metre Hass tree to take the grafts from
Thanks
Con
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19th January 2019 3:01pm
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